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Lake Champlain Committee

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Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Environment, Pollution Abatement & Control

Mission: The Lake Champlain Committee (LCC) works for a clean, accessible Lake Champlain by linking its positions to sound science and bringing a whole-lake perspective to issues. LCC not only highlights problems, but crafts solutions. LCC works to reduce pollution, safeguard natural habitats, and enhance public access.

Target demographics: Residents of and visitors to the Lake Champlain Basin

Geographic areas served: Vermont, New York and Canada

Programs: Science-based Advocacy, Educational Programming, Collaborative Action, Annual Blue-green Algae Monitoring Program, Invasive Species Early Detection and Removal, Lake Champlain Paddlers' Trail, Water Conservation Programming

Community Stories

16 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

Volunteer

Rating: 5

The dedicated staff and volunteers who work for and with the Lake Champlain Committee have for decades made the health of the lake and its watershed their top priority. Their advocacy and educational programs have been key in getting people and policy makers to recognize threats to the lake, and their Cyanobacteria monitoring program is a model for “citizen science” programs, keeping people in two states and two countries informed about water quality issues.

The group also promotes use of the lake through its annual paddlers’ guide for kayakers and its support of the Lake Champlain paddlers’ trail.

It’s one of those indispensable organizations that deserves our support, to spread the message about what we can all do to protect the lake and those who use it for recreation or as a source of drinking water.

Tara Cross G.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I have been a part of LCC Cyanobacteria monitor training program. They are solid in their training and reporting to help keep our community safe and informed.

1 Sandy M.2

Board Member

Rating: 5

I live weekends on Missisquoi Bay which like other sectors of the lake is plagued by algae blooms. The LCC’s algae monitoring volunteers are the sole source of reliable data for monitoring water quality the entire length of the lake. Without them, any opinions about water conditions are anecdotal and haphazard.

It is essential that we have such an outfit committed to the improving water quality through programs of political action coupled with community education and mobilization. Otherwise, there is no hope for our lake.

Who but the LCC would have thought of organizing and maintaining all the campsites for public use the entire length of the Paddlers Trail.

Each board member is extraordinarily capable in their own professional field and profoundly devoted to the cause. As one of them, it is no bother at all for me to give up a business day to drive from Montreal for meetings.

Best of all, we have an executive director who is so energetic, cheerful, effective and well-connected.

1

Board Member

Rating: 5

The LCC has been the preeminent Lake Champlain protection, advocacy, and access group for over 5 decades. Currently, LCC engages a large group of volunteers to monitor lake quality, maintain the paddler’s trail, perform invasive species removal, and survey for new invasive threats. lCC’s advocacy includes a highly effective presence in the Vermont Statehouse, and has been instrumental in numerous pieces of lake protection legislation.
Lake Champlain is an amazing resource and warrants the type of attention that LCC provides. I volunteer and donate to the LCC because it is one of the most effective ways I can make a difference. Join me.

1

Volunteer

Rating: 5

My name is Marie Helene and I am living along the Lake Champlain, on the Canadian side (Missisquoi Bay ).
I was so impressed by the fabulous work of the Lake Champlain Committee, that I decided to volunteer. All summer long, I took pictures and collected samples of cyanobacteria ( blue green algae's) in order to help to find a solution to the problem of the phosphorous in the Lake and to be able, one day, to have clean water again for all purposes: safe swimming, drinking, fishing, touristic, nautical sports and a healthy breathing air for the residents living on the shoreline.
I am glad and proud to be part of the fantastic work, made by Lake Champlain Committee and its team.

Donor

Rating: 5

The Lake Champlain Committee (LCC) is a nonprofit that anyone who supports clean water, responsible environmental stewardship, and legislative activism can contribute to, knowing that their contributions will be effectively spent.

One example of LCC's effectiveness is its Lake Champlain water testing program, a comprehensive volunteer-supported effort aimed at weekly testing for cyanbacteria, or blue-green bacteria, in the Lake Champlain watershed. This is a science-driven program that focuses public attention on a dramatically growing national problem that is affecting bodies of water throughout the US and around the world. Raising public awareness of this serious health and environmental issue is critical, and that is what LCC effectively does so well.

LCC also has become increasingly and effectively involved in public policy efforts to hold elected officials accountable, working for compromise when possible, but refusing to settle for half-measures when environmental realities demand a more forceful policy response.

LCC is an environmental leader in fighting for clean water, and has assembled and deployed an effective array of tools in order to accomplish its goals.





1

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I have been a volunteer lake water monitor for the past several summers. Lori and her team have trained us on how to identify cyanobacteria in the lake water. The training was fascinating, thoughtful and professionally done. Because I have a summer camp on Lake Champlain, it is easy for me to check the lake water and even easier to send a weekly report to the Lake Champlain Committee each week. Lake Champlain is a treasured resource and the Committee is helping us all to realize that we have an obligation to maintain its health. I applaud their work.

1

Volunteer

Rating: 5

The Lake Champlain Committee is an invaluable advocate for the health of Lake Champlain. The role this nonprofit plays in education, outreach and advocacy is unequaled and so important. Lake Champlain had a brief moment in time designated as a “Great Lake”, and is truly one of our nation’s treasures.

This small organization has been untiring in making awareness of the importance of protection for and preservation of water quality so that Lake Champlain will remain a healthy place for all who want to fish, swim, boat, bird and enjoy in, on and around its waters.



There is another service beyond advocacy and scientific studies that the Lake Champlain Committee has been instrumental in, which is the lake monitoring and reporting program for Cyanobacteria. The records and data this program has produced will be invaluable as we move forward with lake protection plans.

We have supported the Lake Champlain Committee for years, but have become involved for the last number of years as volunteers who monitor for Cyanobacteria weekly on a small inland lake in the watershed of Lake Champlain. The LCC staff has come to our small lake to conduct Cyanobacteria monitoring training sessions and has encouraged and supported us as we do our small part to report our lake’s status. The LCCs collaboration with the VT Dept of Health to create an online reporting program has made it possible for anyone wishing to recreate on monitored lakes to check current status.

This is a small but very important nonprofit organization that is doing amazing work!


1

Volunteer

Rating: 5

Several years ago my wife and I saw a greenish film by our dock on Lake Champlain. Not sure what to do we searched on the internet and found the Lake Champlain Committee. We watched their very informative video and felt we had a Cyanobacteria bloom. To be sure we emailed a photograph to the LCC and received an immediate response that it was a type of Cyanobacteria bloom. We were so impressed with LCC that we joined and became monitors. As monitors we do weekly reports to the LCC. In reponese they keep us informed of blooms on Lake Champlain.

1

Board Member

Rating: 5

I have lived and worked in the Champlain Valley of New York State for more than 40 years. And in this time, I have become familiar with the work of the Lake Champlain Committee. In 2010 I joined the Board of Directors, participated as a citizen scientist in monitoring harmful algal blooms, and served as an ambassador and advocate for Lake Champlain as a key landscape feature of New York’s Adirondack Park.
The Lake Champlain Committee represents an important and unique voice for all things Lake Champlain. Naturally, the Lake cannot speak for itself. LCC’s essential and critical role continues to be acting as the Lake’s human representative—giving voice to its issues and concerns in public policy arenas in the US and Canada—In Quebec, Washington, Albany, and Montpelier. Without this voice, maintaining a fishable, swimmable, and drinkable Lake would be impossible, improbable, and unsustainable.

Review from Guidestar

1

Volunteer

Rating: 5

Through Lake Champlain Committee's citizen science program of cyanobacteria monitoring in Lake Champlain, my family and I have learned so much about cyanobacteria in our lake. We have been able to help our community by checking different sites for this organism and reporting it's presence. We also rely on the information that others report as we plan our lake recreation in areas further from home. Lake Champlain Committee's cyanobacteria monitoring program is a huge benefit to all those who use Lake Champlain.

Comments ( 1 )

profile

lcc_ 10/31/2018

Thanks so much Sheila! You've made monitoring a family affair and helped educate your kids about the issues facing our waterways. You are fostering a strong stewardship ethic in your children.

1

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I was kayaking with my son one sunny warm Saturday last summer at Shelburne Pond. When we came to the pull out place, my son said, "Oh, oh. Watch out!" I looked down and saw that the water surface looked like green tempura paint. I had seen this in photos from my monitoring work for the Lake Champlain Committee. But, in my weekly observation of nearby Lake Iroquois, the water had always been clear. My son knew the danger of cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, and helped me get out of my kayak without touching my feet in the water. I rushed home to check the Lake Champlain Committee site to see what I should do. From the directions, I called the health office for the area to report the cyanobacteria bloom so he could post the area, and I also called Lori Fisher, the head of the Lake Champlain Committee, to make sure I had done everything correctly. Lori returned my call within an hour, confirmed that I had followed the proper procedure, and asked if I would be a regular monitor at Shelburne Pond as well as Lake Iroquois, as no one was monitoring it now. I was glad to have the opportunity to go to this beautiful spot every week, and to warn others of the danger that often is present on the green pond surface.
I am grateful to be able to be a member as well as a volunteer of LCC. They are a very active environmental group, with strong programs for education, advocacy, and water quality monitoring to support, protect and nourish our beautiful Lake Champlain.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

The Lake Champlain Committee is an amazing organization that works with many volunteers to help educate the public about the importance of this wonderful economic and recreational resource for both Vermonters and New Yorkers. The LCC also acts as an advocate organization by promoting activities that help to protect the lake’s overall health and well being. I became active with LCC as a volunteer because I have spent many pleasurable hours paddling, camping and biking on and around this beautiful lake. However it has also become apparent that the lake is in great need of some TLC. Algae blooms have become more and more common as well as threats of invasive species such aszebra mussels, water chestnuts and other invasives. Recently I took part in a volunteer effort working collaboratively with several organizations to look for Asian clams, an invasive species that has entered other bodies of water that feed into Lake Champlain. Fortunately we did not find any but will keep monitoring the lake on a yearly basis. I also have volunteered as a site steward, filing reports on campsites that are part of the Lake Champlain Paddlers Trail. The LCC is a multifaceted organization that educates and depends on volunteers taking an active role in acting as protectors of Lake Champlain. LCC works collaboratively with many other Vermont organizations as evidenced by their participation in Vermont Clean Water Initiative. I have also had the experience of participating in this event where community members spent a day at the Vermont State House lobbying for passing clean water legislation. As you can see from my own experiences that this organization is working deliberatively and effectively to engage its citizens in becoming advocates for Lake Champlain. There are so many ways to get involved with this organization and I believe they are getting results from all their efforts!

1

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I have witnessed Lake Champlain Committee advocate for & protect this littlest Great Lake 25+ years, with ever more skill & impact. In recent years, I’ve become one of their cyanobacteria monitors, attending their phenomenal annual training & reporting on lake conditions regularly. Due to their training, I was able this summer to spot a fresh cyanobacteria bloom at a distance (see photo) & report it promptly to our town health officer so that a nearby public beach could be checked for safety. This is but one example of the impact this organization is having on a local level, replicated over a large, ecologically important region.

Carolyn B.3

Donor

Rating: 5

The Lake Champlain is not only the oldest watch dog for Lake Champlain, but the very best. They take lead roles in advocating for a CLEAN lake politically, and they also Walk the talk. Ie members get out and get their hands dirty, testing the water for blue green algae and posting their findings online, so everyone who might go swimming somewhere, or take their dog for a walk along the beach, will know if it is safe to go there. I have used this information a lot, and so have my friends.
I get email updates, too and invitations to go to the state to testify. Lori Fisher and LC are brilliant in their discussions and information given to our politicians.
The entire lake is being investigated, analyzed to come up with the best ways to protect it.
And they hold wonderful parties for everyone to come, once a year, to some grand place on the lake, for walks, lectures, and wonderful local foods.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I monitor and take water samples for Cynobacteria blooms at least once a week from mid June to the last week in October at Red Rocks beach in South Burlington, Vermont. I post my observed results on the VT Dept of Health web-site and bring the samples to the LCC offices for transfer to the VDOH
Within a specific time frame.
LCC provides the education, the tools and the administration in a very efficient and effective manner with minimal resources of their own.
I have been doing this work for about 5 years now.
I get great satisfaction from doing 'this important work which helps the entire Vermont community.
Al Carpenter
LCC Volunteer Cynobacteria Monitor