Over 1.8 million nonprofits and charities for donors, volunteers and funders

Claim This Nonprofit

More Info

Add to Favorites

Share this Nonprofit

Donate

Nonprofit Overview

Community Stories

6 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

4

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 1

This organization supports removing Native American children from their families for adoptive placement with white families, not because of abuse or neglect but because they have decided that a white family is the better environment in which a Native American child should be raised. They would be better served trying to help Native American people on reservations rather than removing their children for adoptive placement. This is NOT about helping Indian children, but about providing exotic children for couples who desire to expand their family. If it was about the children, they would help ALL children, not merely advocate for removal of infants and toddlers. If I could give it less than one star I would Racist organization and adoption-centric.

3

General Member of the Public

Rating: 1

This group posts material on their website that is misleading and disparaging to Native Americans and their communities. The language and material sound like a hate group to me.

The group advocates for the removal of Native children from their natural families.

5 Stella H.

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 1

This is an anti-Native American Hate group. They really advocate for the forced removal of Native kids from the their natural families, community and tribe. Most notoriously they were heavily involved of the violent and forced removal of Veronica Brown (known in the media as Baby Veronica).

Review from Guidestar

3

General Member of the Public

Rating: 2

This nonprofit came to my attention as I was researching the Indian Child Welfare Act. They have valid points and I wanted to know more. However, after looking at their website for about 15 minutes or less, my access was blocked by the administrator. This is causing me to question the validity of the organization. Perhaps this occurs due to a bug in the system, but one would like to think the organization would be aware of this situation and fix it.

I marked that I would be unlikely to donate or volunteer merely because of the lack of access on the website. If allowed to investigate further, I would have marked unsure or likely to donate. My decision is based solely on the restricted access on the website and not on the merits of the organization itself because I wasn't given the opportunity to get more than a precursory glance at what the merits of the organization are.

Review from Guidestar

Board Member

Rating: 5

My husband, 100% Minnesota Chippewa, was always afraid that if something happened to us, our kids would be forced to live on the reservation or with dysfunctional relatives. Having grown up on the res, not even speaking English until he was 5-yrs-old and had started school, and coming from a very large, extended family, he knew what things were really like. The first time he brought me to the res was for the funeral of his 2-yr-old niece who was beaten to death by her parent.

Neglect, abuse, endangerment are all very common in the family and community. Children begin using drugs and alcohol at young ages. Suicide is common. His beautiful, 16-yr-old niece hanged herself in a closet; the pain in her heart so intense that all she had to do was stand up to save herself.

Tribal government claims that the best place for kids is on the reservation, many times living with dysfunctional relatives.
We never felt like these two nieces or any of the others kids in my husband's community, really mattered to tribal or federal government.

We felt that what really mattered to both governments was money, and that his extended family and community are just pawns for those that are in control of the money.

My husband started speaking out about it, testified at several State hearings on various tribal issues, and testified concerning tribal jurisdiction before a select committee for the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs. We began receiving letters from families from across the country expressing pain and tragedy as a result of ICWA.

Five months before he died of cancer, we founded the Christian Alliance for Indian Child Welfare (CAICW) as a way to minister to the hearts of hurting people.

Three weeks before he died, against doctor's advice, he went one last time to DC to speak at the National Press Club and tell Congressmen that ICWA is hurting families. Part of his concern at that point was what would happen after he died to the four grandchildren we were raising.

CAICW is the only Nat’l org advocating for families affected by ICWA. Our advocacy is both judicial & legislative, as well as a prayer resource & shoulder to cry on

Read letters from parents, grandparents, foster families, & adoptive families telling how their children have been hurt by the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) http://www.caicw.org/familystories.html

CAICW has been advocating for families affected by the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) since 2004.
A few Issues of concern:
-- 1) Some Children have been removed from safe, loving homes and placed into dangerous situations.
-- 2) Some families, Indian and non-Indian, have felt threatened by tribal government. Some have had to mortgage homes and endure lengthy legal processes to protect their children.
-- 3) Equal opportunities for adoption, safety and stability are not always available to children of all heritages.
-- 4) The Constitutional right of parents to make life choices for their children, for children of Indian heritage to associate freely, and for children of Indian heritage to enjoy Equal Protection has in many cases been denied. - -

Harmful federal Indian policy affects children and families across the USA. In the words of Dr. William Allen, former Chair, US Comm. On Civil Rights (1989) & Emeritus Professor, Political Science MSU, “... we are talking about our brothers and our sisters. We’re talking about what happens to people who share with us an extremely important identity. And that identity is the identity of free citizens in a Republic…" - -

Review from Guidestar

Volunteer

Rating: 5

On November 19th 2010 my 4 year old daughter was taken from our home. She was trying so hard to get someone in our family to save her, she was sobbing and begging. We couldn't do a thing...imagine. Imagine losing a member of your family because of a law that allows that to happen. Imagine having that in your head for the rest of your life. I relive that moment everyday..everyday. She is 1/2 native american and is therefore affected by the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA). This law was put into place to keep NA children from being taken from their homes. It
was put into place for a good reason. Now children are sometimes placed in dangerous and deadly situations because no one wants to oppose this law. We got our daughter when she was 7 months old and she was taken from us right before her 4th birthday. The best interest of the child was not taken into consideration. Her attorney thought it was not good for her, but the tribe and other "so called" professionals stated it was okay for her to be traumatized (she also has attachment disorder). When is it okay to traumatize a child? Please help us bring awareness to this problem. It happens all the time and know one knows unless it happens to you. Please help.

Review from Guidestar