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Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Animal Protection & Welfare, Animal-Related, Animals, Veterinary Services

Mission: SNAP''s mission is to prevent the suffering and death of cats and dogs due to overpopulation and preventable diseases, especially in low-income areas.

Direct beneficiaries per year: 45,000 animals per yer

Geographic areas served: Houston and San Antonio

Programs: The first of its kind in the nation, this mobile clinic started in 1994 in Harris County, Texas, to take spay-neuter and rabies vaccination services directly into low-income neighborhoods, offering them free to indigent families on need-based public assistance programs. It helps about 5,000 cats and dogs annually. We have recently acquired a second mobile clinic for Houston that so far has only worked at the city shelter but which we want to use for special projects and backup for the original mobile clinic. The project has been funded to go into neighboring counties on special projects.

Community Stories

2 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

1

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 5

I know SNAP (Spay Neuter Assistance Program) is making a difference when I drive down the street and DON'T see dead animals on the side of the road or animals roaming the streets homeless! 'No Birth Is The First Step To No Kill'! And when the city tells me that the no-kill rate is at 82%, which is significant! Good job everyone!

Janet25

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 5

As a rescuer in Houston for years before SNAP opened, I am so appreciative of their services as well as their service level. This was especially important during the years I worked with retired racing greyhounds who have anesthesia sensitivities. They were excellent with them.Their phone number and website are imprinted on my brain to share with anyone with whom I come in contact with intact animals. Janet Huey