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Palomacy Pigeon & Dove Adoptions

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Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Animals, Wildlife Preservation & Protection

Mission: Palomacy Pigeon & Dove Adoptions saves the lives of domestic (unreleasable) birds that are otherwise killed by providing guidance, referrals, education, long-term foster care, avian vet treatment and adoption services. Palomacy is a volunteer-powered, donation-supported project of Community Initiatives. Thanks to the support of our volunteers, we have saved the lives of more than 800 birds since we began in 2007 and helped countless others. Please visit us at www.PigeonRescue.org and at www.Facebook.com/PigeonDiplomacy

Results: Last year, Palomacy saved more than 300 pigeons & doves from being killed by providing avian vet care, foster and forever homes. The need is nonstop and we are working hard to provide rescue to the pigeons & doves in seven SF/Bay Area counties as well as coaching & referral assistance all over the country & even internationally.

Target demographics: save the lives of domestic and unreleasable pigeons and doves that would otherwise be killed for lack of homes.

Direct beneficiaries per year: More than 300 pigeons & doves

Geographic areas served: San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Alameda, Contra Costa, Solano & Marin Counties

Programs: Support for unreleasable pigeons & doves in animal shelters, avian vet care and rehab for ill & injured, foster homes, humane education and placement in screened and approved forever homes.

Community Stories

143 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

General Member of the Public

Rating: 5

“What kind of bird is this?” That simple text message, along with the photograph that accompanied it, marked the beginning of my role as a pigeon-mom. It also led me to Palomacy, a pigeon and dove rescue organization comprised of the most extraordinary individuals whom one could ever hope to meet. The text was from my co-worker, Kathryn. The bird featured in the photograph was Francesco, an amazing pigeon who has touched my life in a most profound way. One summer afternoon two months ago, Francesco flew over the fence into Kathryn’s yard, where she and her family were enjoying their day poolside. Francesco was clearly a tame bird, readily approaching them and even hopping up onto the lawn furniture to sit next to them. Though tame, he had no band, nothing by which to identify the person to whom he might belong. The family decided to let the bird stay while they continued to swim and talk – and stay the bird did. Hours passed, and Francesco stayed. The family went indoors, and Francesco stayed. Actually, no, he did not stay when they went indoors. He tried to follow them into the house.Evening approached, and Francesco made it clear that he did not plan to go anywhere. Kathryn decided that she had to act. Naturally, she reached out to me, not because I had any knowledge of pigeons, but because I am that crazy bird lady and lover of all animals, one of those people who is easily suckered into permanently housing any creature in need. “Kathryn, can’t you take the bird?” I already knew the answer to my question. Kathryn could not take him. What else could I do but drive the forty minutes to her house with one of my parrot’s travel cages in tow? What did I know about pigeons? Absolutely nothing. I had not the foggiest idea what to do with this pigeon whom I had just welcomed into our home. Moreover, as it happened, my knowledge of parrots did not transfer to pigeons – at all. I was clueless as to this pigeon’s needs and began to panic. Why is he making such weird noises and running around in circles? Why is his neck so puffed up that it resembles a lion’s mane? Why on earth is he twitching his wings – is he having a seizure? Knowing that you are responsible for a living creature about which you are completely ignorant is an excruciatingly humbling and terrifying experience. To my dismay, I quickly discovered that I was not alone in my ignorance. For about five days, I did the best that I could to take care of this bird. I received a lot of advice from folks who meant well but who also did not have the knowledge to help me, including an avian veterinarian who treated Francesco for a respiratory infection and parasites but also told me that he may be a wild pigeon and that I should consider releasing him into the wild once he was strong and healthy again. That last bit of advice just did not sit well with me, and it was the last straw. I absolutely had to find someone who knew enough about pigeons and who could help me. I had exhausted all local resources, but during an internet search days earlier, I had come across a California pigeon and dove rescue organization called Palomacy. I decided to send a message to the rescue’s Facebook page, hoping against hope that someone at this organization would take the time to read my plea for help in Connecticut and agree to call me.I don’t think an hour passed before I received a response from the founder and director of Palomacy, Elizabeth Young, whose passion for and devotion to these birds is rivaled only by her energy and tireless efforts to provide a sanctuary and educate the public about how special they are. In her response, Elizabeth thanked me for rescuing Francesco. She also gave me her phone number. “I am super busy, but if I can’t answer when you call, leave a message, and I will call you back.” That very same day, Elizabeth spent the better part of an hour on the phone with me, telling me all about pigeons, offering her invaluable insight and advice, and answering my countless questions with the patience of a saint. I will never be able to express to Elizabeth how grateful I felt for her support that day and how grateful I remain for her continuing support. At Elizabeth’s invitation, I also joined the Palomacy Facebook Group. When I first joined the group, it was just a resource for me, a group of people with much more knowledge than I had about pigeons, a group of people who could answer questions and help me take proper care of Francesco. Within minutes, sometimes seconds, after posting a question, answers and suggestions appeared. From Elizabeth and the Palomacy Group, I learned that pigeons are absolutely amazing creatures. Pigeons are homebodies. They mate for life. They have “pigeon marriages” and will stay with their “pigeon spouse” even as the beloved mate is dying. Pigeons are fiercely loyal, devoted, emotional, romantic, and intelligent beings. Indeed, they possess all of the same traits that people value in other people. I learned all of this and then some about pigeons from Elizabeth and from the Palomacy Group, but I also learned more. Palomacy has enriched my life in a way that I never expected. Every time I log onto my Facebook page, my feed is overflowing with stories about people rescuing precious life. These days, my Facebook feed is literally flooded with human kindness, kindness toward the lives rescued as well as toward the people doing the rescuing. Palomacy is an exceptional organization, and Elizabeth Young is an exceptional individual. I just cannot sing her praises enough. Elizabeth and those who support her rescue embody the qualities that we value most in life – compassion, empathy, integrity, industriousness, devotion, honesty, and loving-kindness. Quite frankly, Palomacy embodies the traits of the very birds that it rescues. Who wouldn’t want to be part of an organization like that, who wouldn’t want to donate to an organization like that, and who wouldn’t want to learn about and love the birds that Palomacy works so tirelessly to save? Palomacy – it’s for the birds, and it’s for the people too. It’s for all of us who want to make this world a better place, one act of kindness at a time.

Client Served

Rating: 5

This community of dove and pigeon fanciers bring real joy to the world. They put so much work into providing homes for birds and educating people on their care. It's such a pure love. I'm so very grateful to have been connected with these fine folks and their sweet little creatures.

1

Donor

Rating: 5

When my girlfriend found three king pigeons at a Bart station we were way in over our heads. We love animals, but had never cared for birds, much less three sickly baby birds. I had read about Palomacy, and knew it was an awesome rescue group, but Palomacy is so much more. It's a safety net and an amazing community of hard working, compassionate, and generous people. When I ran out of money for vet bills Palomacy made sure Watermelon, Cantaloupe, and Honeydew still got treatment, an incredibly generous act given the extended stay at the vet the melons required. And when Honeydew succumbed to her infections the emotional support from Elizabeth and the Palomacy group was incredibly helpful.

Watermelon isn't out of the woods yet with neurological symptoms, but I feel much better knowing Palomacy's decade of experience is backing us up.

I donated so other pigeons and doves can be as lucky as the melons, and I plan to make many more donations to Palomacy. I also would love to volunteer, maybe someday the melons can be pigeon ambassadors. Palomacy is doing hard work that almost no one else is doing. I hope more and more people adopt and foster pigeons and doves from them, and learn like I did how spectacular the birds and the people of Palomacy are. I don't know what we would have done without them!

And here's a photo of me and Cantaloupe spending some quality time together.

Client Served

Rating: 5

Without palomacy I don't know how what I would do sometimes. when I got my first pair of doves I was confident that I could take care of them no problem and with all the books I had read and the websites I had looked at I could face anything they could throw at me. boy was I wrong. books are fine and all, but when something came up that wasn't in one of my four books I was lost. I asked on a few forums and emailed a few local bird experts, but they knew very little about pigeons or doves. so, when I didn't know if my girls were laying too often I decided "well palomacy is half way across the country, but why not give it a shot", that was one of the best decisions I could have ever made.


within an hour of joining the Facebook group they had set up I had folks who knew tons about pigeons from across the country jumping to answer my questions. people from north, south, east, and west. amateurs who were learning right by my side and experts who have rescued hundreds of birds all working together to improve the lives of all these creatures. I have learned more from the kind soles at Palomacy than any book could teach me. I was surprised to see the founder, Elizabeth Young, in the thick of it all doing what she could do to help right on the ground floor with the rest of us. she’s one of the kindest souls I've ever met.


not only did they help me with my two bonded hens Luna and Aurora, but when I went in to the pet store that I bought the girls at with my mom we saw two week and malnourished babies that they let hatch. and found out that they had already had to put down three others that had splay legs just like these two little guys. with their help, I brought the two fledglings home and added Tango and Foxtrot to my flock. with the help of Palomacy I learned how to apply braces to their legs to try and fix them, though it didn't work because I got to them too late they still live wonderful lives and continue to get better every day.


Palomacy has been a godsend for me and my flock, thank you for everything you do!



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Client Served

Rating: 5

I don't know what we would have done without Palomacy! My son brought home two adult ring neck doves seven months ago. Palomacy provided a great deal of pre-support, and has been there whenever we needed advice or help with them. Then two months ago we rescued a pair of ring neck dove siblings who were only 2-3 weeks old. They were bred in a pet store with improper nesting materials which resulted in both of them having severe splayed legs. And disfigured feet. The store had already euthanized two birds born to the same parents and also who had developed splays, and that was the plan for these as well. We had little space, little money, and even less experience with juvenile doves, much less those needing rehab. Palomacy has been there from the word go. Help with feeding (the mother had stopped feeding them), help with orthotics, help with cages and set up (their needs are different), help with introducing them to our reluctant adults. They even reached out to Dr. Speers at Medic Center for Birds on our behalf regarding the splay when it became apparent that there were no vets or even rehab centers familiar with pigeons much less doves, less than several states away. They continue to be a source of support and hope not only for us and our now family of four birds, but for countless people and pigeons and doves around the world. They bring help and support where there otherwise would be none.

1

General Member of the Public

Rating: 5

Palomacy Pigeon and Dove Rescue goes above and beyond the call of duty when it comes to rescuing, caring for, fostering, and placing vulnerable pigeons and doves. In addition, Elizabeth and her team of wonderful volunteers help educate the public about these wonderful, intelligent, sensitive birds and the plight they face. From racing pigeons that lose their way and are injured and starving, to lost doves that have been released as part of a wedding or other event whugh have no survival instincts, to misguided rescues of King pigeons, released by careless humans into the wild with no way to survive. The Palomacy team has helped them all. I have never seen them turn down a rescue opportunity, no matter how crowded their aviaries are or how busy they get. They help in many other ways too. There is a whole team of volunteers that goes around the Bay area and helps unstring pigeons that have gotten caught up in string disposed of by careless humans. I live in Seattle and they were a huge help to me as well. There is no pigeon rescue org here but when my son brought home a 5 day old pigeon a couple of years ago and I had no idea what the birds needs were, I was able to find information on how to care for this tiny squeaker on Palomacy's website. None of my local wildlife rehab centers were taking feral/non-native birds at the time and taking the bird to animal control was not an option I was willing to pursue. Palomacy offers so much information and support for people in my situation. I was able to tube feed the baby bird, build him a cage, and enjoy the past couple of years with my new companion. Since then, I have tried to help birds in need of review in my area and pass on the knowledge that I learned from Palomacy to others about what wonderful birds pigeons and doves really are. I now have several rescues in my own aviary and am contacted often as the local 'bird lady who knows what to do' when someone in my area find a pigeon or dove in need of help.

General Member of the Public

Rating: 5

Palomacy does awesome work! Learning about Palomacy inspired me to get involved in bird and wildlife rescue in my area. I've adopted 2 doves and hope to take in more and enjoy volunteering at a local wildlife rehab. Seeing the passion of the volunteers in this group inspired me to make birds my number 1 hobby!

1

General Member of the Public

Rating: 5

Elizabeth has done a remarkable job rescuing so many deserving pigeons! She has also developed a network of people wirldwide who help pigeons. When our beloved Phoebe was rescued, I learned about Palomacy. Elizabeth gave me a lot of emotional support and suggestions when our wonderful Blue got out of his shed for three days, until he finally was home and reunited with his beloved Phoebe. She provides great resources and aid to people who find lost and hurt racing pigeons. The world is a much better place due to Elizabeth and Palomacy.

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 5

Working with pigeons, I have seen firsthand how incredibly unfair these gentle birds are being treated all over the world. People seem to dislike (and even hate) them for no good reason whatsoever. Which is why it warms my heart to see nonprofits such as Palomacy. The love that they have for these amazing creatures is so obvious, and it's also clear that they have a lot of knowledge about how to best take care of pigeons and doves. They show people that pigeons are beautiful and smart and that they deserve respect and love. The world needs more organizations like Palomacy.

2

Donor

Rating: 5

Few creatures have suffered the indignities of man’s fickleness as pigeons have. I mean creatures with whom we share our everyday lives, in urban and suburban spaces. Yes, the cat has been patient with our love hate relationship with her, but think of that one creature to which we attach all sorts of “alternative facts”. Facts like “they carry so many diseases”, “they are rats with wings.” And then proceed to ignore them even when they are all around us in our cities, under our overpasses and perched on our powerlines. But perhaps the worst of all indignities is that they do not fall under a protected species (most birds do- therefore it is prohibited to harbor them, harm them, try to poison them, and when rescued, can’t be killed).

I work in the environmental department at a large power plant. One day a squab was brought to my office. My first call was to our nearby bird sanctuary. They wanted nothing to do with it and even recommended I take it to a vet to be euthanized. I then went online to the Michigan DNR. I called rehabilitator after rehabilitator and none would take my calls. In years past, finding a rehabilitator willing to take a stray merganser was not trouble, but now, here was this tiny baby pigeon looking up at me expectantly- me who had never owned a bird in her life and knew nothing about the care of one, much less a baby. That’s when my desperate searches led me to Palomacy. Their organization is so well structured and rich with information that within minutes I had found a forum and videos which walked me step by step from what and how to feed a squab to how to house it.

I did this fully expecting baby to be dead every morning. But this little one was a patient teacher, and the information from Palomacy and their linked forums provided me with support and knowledge needed to do things right. One rescue became seven, four being successful releases, one having found a forever home, and I kept three for company. All through this I perused Palomacy’s pages, blogs and instructions. I looked for a foster home through their site, even if by the time I found a couple of places in Chicago who would take this little pigeon in I had decided to keep my little charge.

I think there was no avoiding falling in love with my little rescue. But I know that Palomacy had a lot to do with fully opening my eyes to what lovely creatures pigeons and doves are and how much work there is to do just to get them viewed favorably by most. I donate regularly to a few charities, but few have a webpage with this level of information. It provides videos: fun and educational, blogs: personal and informative, and many links. They are tireless educators, always reaching out to the community. But what I love is that they let the community help as well, teaching each other and sharing best practices. Some organizations can veer into an attitude that only they know what’s best. Palomacy seems to exude that same open tender love much like pigeons do. Any organization that is helping and open and eager to hear from you is an organization that is going to last long and go far.
I now take every opportunity I have not just to talk about my pigeons in hopes of opening more eyes and hearts to them but also about Palomacy and the work they are doing. For example, their calendar contest was a fantastic idea and incentive to get us to spread the word and be part of their community by becoming essential in fund raising. It was so rewarding to see my friends and family donating to Palomacy, as I am sure it was for Palomacy.

1

Client Served

Rating: 5

Lois & Alice

I have never been a bird person. Period. When I was a newly-wed a hundred years ago, my then husband brought home a Quaker parrot. It was a hate/hate relationship that lasted about two months before I insisted it be brought back to where it came from. Never understood how anyone could have these flighty, pecky, noisy, messy, and destructive little creatures in their homes. And I’m talking about birds not men. Although……..

A few decades later, I currently have two indoor rescue pigeons that I would fall on a sword for. And it happened quickly. Almost like there was plan in place to shake me out of my coma-like existence when it came to pets.

A little over a year ago, I was very content with my two pedigree elderly Ragdoll cats. Enter Janice, a co-worker at a newspaper office I worked at in Malibu. Under “bunny-hugger”, there is a photo of Janice. She only worked at the paper a few hours a week and sweetly asked if I would mind assisting in the care of a “white dove” she found. She had received approval from the owner of the paper to keep this “dove” at our work place. She made it sound fun! We could have a contest at work coming up with a name! Keep it in the accounting department and listen to it coo softly all day! On and on and on.

Janice had found Lois Lane (contest winner name) stranded and unable to fly in an area of Malibu that is very tranquil and apparently, a perfect place for celebrations and dove releases. She gathered up the “dove” and took it immediately to the wildlife center where they promptly put it in with some chickens. This niggled at Janice for several days and after gaining approval to keep the bird at work, she re-rescued Lois (for which the Center hilariously charged her) and brought her into the office.

In short order, I realized Janice nor I knew very little about the care and feeding of this bird. We had a cage, some seeds and water and this pretty little bird that didn’t so much as make a peep. I’m not certain when I came across Palomacy, but I’m almost sure it was on that first day. I was totally panicked. Elizabeth was the first and ONLY person to return my frantic calls.

Elizabeth calmly told me what to do and after describing what the bird looked like, burst my bubble by informing me that what we had was a pigeon. A “homer” at that. I fought that tooth and nail. I did not want a mere pigeon, I wanted a sweet-cooing dove. The Peace & Love and married for life kind of dove. It took me weeks and tons of research to realize yes, Lois is a homer. Not even a King. A homer. Dumb name. As in “Homer Simpson”. I didn’t realize that homer meant HOMING PIGEON.

Poor Elizabeth was then my new best friend and I called frequently. Everything made me a nervous wreck. Was the cage big enough? How much should we feed her? Doesn’t she need another pigeon friend? Is it acceptable to leave her ALL ALONE ON WEEKENDS???? It didn’t help that Lois was going through a soft molt.

This went on for a few months and during that time Lois really was the calmest, quietest bird. So bomb-proof. We moved her cage around the office several times to find better locations, were constantly buying new and improved cage stuff (dishes, toys, mirrors and nesting thingys) and just futzing in general with her environment.

In my on-going research and constant conversations with Elizabeth, I determined that Lois needed to spend time outside in the sunshine and fresh air. Lois just seemed so complacent; not unhappy but resigned. I was very twitter-pated about this. So, I purchased an Easy Up. Which is basically a big enclosed play pen for camping. Not predator proof AT ALL but we made do. Lois now got to go outside every day. I was happy. For a few weeks.

It’s hard to believe but we rarely if at all touched this bird. We would move her cage from the office to the easy up outside, open the cage door, put a large bowl of water for her to bath in and then take her back in at the end of the day. Janice and I were pushing hard to rescue another pigeon friend for her as she was left alone so much – especially on the weekends. We were met with a lot of resistance from the staff. We literally did not have the room in the office for a larger cage and building an outdoor aviary was not going to happen as it took tons of begging and cajoling to even erect the Easy-up outside our office space.

Around this time, I decided to finally move closer to my children in Tehachapi CA. A small mountain community 175 miles north of Malibu. As I was giving notice, I burst into tears and emphatically stated “AND I’M TAKING LOIS WITH ME”!!! Like a 5-year-old. I still can’t believe those words came out of my mouth. I was met with no resistance – more like, THANK GOD. Can we help you pack up and put the bird in the car for you? Humph!

Very quickly I moved and installed Lois in my home where she has a Rolls Royce of a cage that she resides in only at bedtime, poops on organic bird cage paper and can fly up to specifically installed corner perches in my office/indoor aviary all day and every day.

Now it was time adopt her a buddy! With the assistance, once again of Elizabeth, I adopted sweet, sweet Alice from Palomacy. Yes, another female homing pigeon. Suffice it to say, there was a brief period of time where I was convinced Lois was a male – even renamed her Lincoln. Unfortunately, that brief period of time coincided at the exact same time I was adopting Alice. Hence, the two females. It’s not perfect but we make it work. I’m the official mate of both these girls.

Thank you, Elizabeth, Palomacy and all the pigeon/dove rescuers out there. I read every single post you guys make and have learned so much this last year. My ignorance of pigeons and birds in general proves how wrong I was and how truly adaptable these guys are. They fumble right along with you while you’re learning and never complain. That does not stop me from continuously trying to make their habitat fun and entertaining. I love the phrase: You will not save the world by adopting a pigeon, but you will save that pigeon’s world.

In conclusion, these sweet little misunderstood birds have changed my life for the better. There is not a day that goes by that I don’t laugh out loud at them. I love them, love them, love them.

Now if I could just find a male that could take on two females…..

General Member of the Public

Rating: 5

Elizabeth helped me with a seriously injured pigeon I found. She gave her time, advice , she is a dedicated person who deeply cares about helping pigeons and doves. Because of her and Palomacy , the little bird received medical care and a new home with a wonderful foster mom. Thank you Elizabeth!

Lara13

Volunteer

Rating: 5

We have been fostering pigeons for Elizabeth for about a year now and every time I spend time with them I learn something new. Elizabeth is so helpful with helping us better engage the pigeons and works really hard to help save these birds lives. This is a wonderful organization!

Patti57

Donor

Rating: 5

I have supported Palomacy’s mission (previously Mickacoo) since 2009. I met Elizabeth Young at an adoption fair. She brought beautiful Peppermint, a recent rescued King Pigeon who still had markings from a red permanent marker over some of his white feathers. I learned of the plight of the domestic pigeon. In 2014 Palomacy came to my aid to help a self-rescuing pigeon. A beautiful domestic pigeon came to my front yard asking for help. He was hungry and thirsty, without injury. Immediately I asked Elizabeth for assistance. She was there for me, providing guidance to me and gave me the resources to gain the knowledge I would need to care for this gorgeous, sweet bird. In 2016, a relative found a domestic pigeon on their porch. The bird was dyed purple and pink, was emaciated and dehydrated. She refused to self-feed or drink. Again, I asked Elizabeth for assistance. With her immediate guidance, the bird survived. This year we rebuilt our aviary to hold more pigeons. Surprisingly, it is easier to have a flock of pigeons than a couple. It is enjoyable to relax and watch their interactions. These birds deserve respect and compassion. Unfortunately, there are too many suppliers from releasing, racing and other exploitive sporting activities that place these poor birds in harm’s way. I am grateful for Palomacy and their tireless work to help the birds and educate people who foster and adopt them.

Previous Stories
1

Donor

Rating: 5

I am a long-time supporter of Palomacy and have two rescued pigeons. Although I have bird knowledge, I have no experience with rehabilitation.

Last week, my aunt and uncle in Yuba City found a pigeon on their front porch window ledge. They called shelters in the area and couldn't find any that would help this bird. In fact, one suggested they put the bird back outside so it could fly home. They kept me posted and sent a picture. This pigeon had been dyed purple and pink.

I brought the pigeon home that evening. Elizabeth guided me on how to get the bird to drink and eat. It only weighed 152 grams. I had to feed the bird by hand. I repeated before work and at noon. When I arrived home that evening, there were signs the bird was self-feeding.

The pigeon has been named Jo Jo after my aunt who just passed away July 5th. In one week, it has gained 51 grams and I am confident it will make a full recovery.

Elizabeth and Palomacy are the most ethical, devoted, knowledge and helpful non-profit. They are the only organization who is willing to take on an unrelenting workload of the domestic pigeons who are released and unable to survive on their own.

Jo Jo should never have been dyed or released. There are monsters amongst us who think nothing of releasing these gentle, sweet birds to their doom. Luckily the pigeons have Palomacy. Still, there is an enormous need for financial help to pay vet bills, outreach to educate the public, and find foster and forever homes for the many injured birds that find their way to Palomacy.

Many thanks to Elizabeth for her tireless devotion to the pigeons.

Aria J.

Donor

Rating: 5

What a hero - what a group of heros. While thousands look after the usual lovable suspects - cats and dogs - someone is dedicating themselves to tirelessly, without fame or wealth from it, helping our invisible neighbors that we see yet manage to look past everyday: pigeons and doves. You hear about an animal and you feel assured knowing a shelter or society will care for it and tend it back to health... but pigeons? They don't have this luxury - no one has their back - until Palomacy.

I can't express to you how important it is to me that someone would dedicate themselves to the animals with the least PR and difficult image with people.

Everyday - in someway - Palomacy educated people about pigeons and doves - cruel practices they must endure - how great of pets they are - clearing up misconceptions (they aren't dirty - they bathe as soon as they are given a chance! They don't pass on diseases like bird flu!) - and changes the public perception - person by person - towards our fellow city dwellers (lest we not forget either that they are acclaimed war heros that have saved our soldiers in many battles by carrying messages!)

Ive seen Palomacy and their volunteers up close - they connected us with our pet - a pigeon we couldn't live without - when just earlier we would have never guessed a pigeon could be a pet!

We feel so indebted to them. The work they do is so sincere, earnest, and difficult - yet through their perseverance and bravery they have saved COUNTLESS bird lives and connected hundreds of families with the pets they love for a lifetime.

It's one thing to be another advocate for the animals we all know and love already - it's something entirely more brave, in my opinion, to take the position to advocate for an animal that is not well loved and much is unknown about. That's something really special.

THANK YOU from the bottom of my heart Palomacy ❤️

Previous Stories

Donor

Rating: 5

Absolutely amazing charity. They do wonderful work for one of the most overlooked and uncared for animals in the world. Mind you these animals, pigeons, are our oldest friends and most ancient pets. It's because of us they roam cities now, and we can't just turn our back on these peaceful wonderful animals.

Furthermore the leadership at Palomacy is absolutely top notch. They are spending every penny to help further their cause and go above and beyond.

I have to tell you, I am someone normally skeptical about giving to nonprofits because I fear the funds will be spent to just raise more money in a perpetual cycle. Well, I did my homework with these guys and they are just so dedicated, often reaching to their own pockets to continue their help.
I can't sing enough praises. I will continue to donate all of my life - this is the most exemplary nonprofit I have yet to encounter - a model I wish all types of other nonprofits would adopt.

No Bureaucracy here - JUST RESULTS. Thank you Palomacy!

1 Trish F.

General Member of the Public

Rating: 5

On March 31st of 2014 I rescued a king pigeon that was walking around in my yard in the rain..turned snow. She let me pick her up which I figured was a sign that she was sick.
I've never owned a bird in my life but I really love animals! I then went online looking for any help I could find. The only place I found that offered the help I needed was Palomacy Pigeon & Dove Adoptions. The expert help I got from Elizabeth Young and all the people in the group is the reason I still have my Tuukka today..almost 3 years later! I started out completely clueless and now I've offered advice of my own. I've never met such a wonderful and caring group in my life! If they can't help you..they will find someone who will. They really really care about all pigeons & doves and go far beyond what anyone could expect!

1

Client Served

Rating: 5

I am a pigeon fancier and was in a serious accident last year. None of my friends or family knew what to do with my birds. Palomacy came to my rescue and took care of them until my recovery. Were it not for them I might have lost my birds.

The people I have met and come to know dedicate so much of their time and talent to helping these birds - rescue, care, fostering, adoption. They are passionate about their work and will "go to the wall" for their rescues. They even have a nationally acclaimed veterinary clinic - Medical Center for Birds (Oakley, CA) helping them. Every pigeon receives the best care you can imagine.

2

Client Served

Rating: 5

I am 13 and have been wanting pigeons for a very long time. after doing a decent amount of research I stumbled across Palomacy. I immediately ran to my parents, and we began to build an aviary. after about 3 weeks, we had a small aviary, that was nicely furnished with things for the pigeons, and now we came upon the hardest task. We had to find some pigeons to adopt. I sent Elizabeth(palomacy director) an email, and she quickly replied. She took us out to an aviary and we looked around, until we settled on a little brown fantail named charlie. For about 2 months elizabeth worked closely with us to help find charlie a mate, and find another kind pair to be with them, after charlie had been a little shoved around by bigger pigeons. Finally, we found a mate, and another pair, and they all now happily live in our aviary, all thanks to this wonderful organization.

1

General Member of the Public

Rating: 5

This past Thanksgiving a little pigeon came into my husbands shop where he works asking for help. At first, he was put back outside. Someone was driving a forklift into the shop and this little bird got on the forklift and rode back into the shop. He stayed very close to the men working, despite saws being run and lots of loud commotion. We knew something was up. My husband and I had done pitbull rescue for more than ten years, but we hadn't the faintest clue on how to go about rescuing a pigeon. He was eating and drinking and didn't look too compromised, but I feared taking him to any kind of shelter or wildlife center because he's just a pigeon and would be euthanized. I got online straight away and was lucky enough to find Palomacy. I live in Washington state, but that didn't stop Elizabeth from helping me. She answered my email immediately and then called me!! She walked me through how to care for Dee with amazing kindness and patience. (First Deandra because we thought he might be female, now Deangelo because he's a he for sure!) If I didn't have Elizabeth for support, I would have crumbled for sure. I was so worried I wasn't doing it right. She has sent me emails, texts, links, pictures, has put me in touch with other rescuers and pumped me full of encouragement. I have learned so much in just a short period of time. Mostly how wonderful these little dinosaurs are and how wonderful are the people who devote their lives to them.
Palomacy is an organization other rescuers, of any animal, should model themselves after. Their website is full of helpful information and resources. Their members and volunteers are knowledgeable and committed. Outreach programs, always educating, fundraising, they are amazing! I wish all our animals in need had a Palomacy!
This weekend we adopted Taffy, a beautiful Roller found as a stray. We are hoping it is a love connection and our Sweet Dee can be fulfilled. Thank you Elizabeth, Jill and all at Palomacy for your help and encouragement. You are my heroes!!

Zenon H.

Client Served

Rating: 5

I just checked , and Palomacy is apparently 2,979 miles away from me, and everyone there has still found dozens of ways to help me.

Almost exactly a year ago, I impulsively adopted a pigeon after carefully researching parrot ownership for the past 6 months. I figured, "hey, they're both, birds, right?" and assumed enough of my research would be relevant for me to still be an informed owner to this gray lump of feathers I just brought home.

Yeah... pigeons and parrots are not really the same.

I was desperately trying to research pigeons kept as pets online, and I was wading through link after link on competitive pigeon racing and blog posts about that one time someone found a dehydrated pigeon outside and let it stay in their home for a week to recover before re-releasing it. Nothing was coming up where someone was keeping a pigeon as a pet the same way someone would keep a house cat.

After about two days of trudging through google searches and contacting people that continued to care for their birds after they were injured racing, I finally found the Palomacy website.

Now let me tell you about this website.

It's glorious.

It immediately answered all my questions, and answers all the questions that someone pretty new to owning a pigeon would need to know.

There are professional looking photos and writing on what your cage setup should be for your bird at home, and an entire portion of the website dedicated to stories about the pigeons and doves that had been taken in by the non-profit (which I referenced often in order to get a feel for how a pet pigeon would behave.)

The information Palomacy has put out is so inclusive, that after doing some interviews online about owning a pigeon, I just had to point in the direction of the site as a resource and it would do all the heavy lifting for me explaining the entirety of a pigeon or dove's needs. Someone even went out and adopted a fantail pigeon after hearing my story and checking out the site!

Eventually, I looked up Palomacy on Facebook, and contacted the founder, Elizabeth Young. She was so kind with how much personal attention she put into giving me advice on my bird, and every time a particularly specific question or situation would pop up, she always quickly put me in contact with someone that knew exactly what to do because they'd gone through it already.

Palomacy doesn't just far exceed my expectations, it far exceeds the 3,000 miles separating us through how much everyone there has made sure I have the resources to give my pigeon a fulfilling life.