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Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Crime & Law, Domestic Violence, Family Violence Shelters, Homeless & Housing, Spouse Abuse Prevention, Unknown

Mission: The mission of La Casa de las Madres is to respond to calls for help from domestic violence victims, of all ages, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. We give survivors the tools to transform their lives. We seek to prevent future violence by educating the community and by redefining public perceptions about domestic violence.

Results: Our success is two-tiered. Each time a contact is made, educational presentation given, the crisis line rings or someone requests counseling we are successful. There are many choices to be made by a person seeking to address or escape violence in his or her life. Each step is invaluable in what is usually an incremental move toward safety. We measure this impact by tracking services and participants. In FY 2009-10, La Casa de las Madres’ services were utilized as follows: • 4,295 callers received crisis counseling, resources and referrals through our statewide, toll-free Adult and Teen Crisis Lines; • 893 domestic violence victims accepted Domestic Violence Response Team crisis or follow-up assistance; -Among them, 136 accessed DVRT legal assistance in pursuing a restraining order; • 219 women and 206 children received emergency shelter and support services; • 474 women and families received practical and emotional support through the Drop-In Counseling Center; -Among them, 46 families received specific assistance with custody and visitation; • 212 adolescents participated in individual and group activities of the Teen Program; • the MEI Case Management Program provided housing stability, community-building and emotional support services to 177 residents of the Mary Elizabeth Inn and Verona Hotel; • the Safe Housing Project worked with staff and residents of 75 Bay Area supportive housing sites and provided direct intervention to resident women and families; and • 430 community education and outreach activities educating 7,907 teens and adults and reaching more than 49,000 community members were undertaken. We also strive to offer services wherein victims can immediately access needed support, be safe, and build a stable foundation from which to start or continue an independent life free from abuse. So we are successful when we have provided a timely, relevant response; alleviated crisis; and facilitated improved quality of life through an increased sense of safety, prevention of homelessness, and encouragement of thriving. To determine if we are reaching milestones and benchmarks specific to each program, we solicit feedback in periodic surveys and exit interviews about experiences with services, what has worked or is not working. A sample of results include: 94% of women exited emergency shelter with an increased sense of self-efficacy, and were better able to identify the warning signs of a dangerous relationship. Among adult Drop In Center participants, 92% felt better able to advocate for themselves and/or their children’s needs in the community. Among moms engaging in clinical child-focused trauma interventions at the drop in center 84% reported their children exhibited more positive attachment and/or improved behavior. Finally, among teen educational session participants, 91% agreed that, in a relationship, everyone is responsible for their own behavior; and 2% requested individualized follow up services.

Target demographics: Domestic violence is a crime that affects all members of society regardless of race, culture, economic class, educational background, age, sexual orientation or physical ability. Accordingly, La Casa’s services are available to all domestic violence victims and survivors. To facilitate access, we also actively strive to reach underserved and vulnerable groups including women of color, low income families, young mothers, youth aging out of foster care, immigrants, monolingual non-English speakers (particularly Spanish), LGBTQQI, the geographically isolated, and women with disabilities.

Direct beneficiaries per year: 14,386

Geographic areas served: Women, children and Teens in the bay area

Programs: Domestic violence victims must be able to access safety as well as services supporting their transition to a violence free life. La Casa provides that bridge for battered women, teens and children seeking to escape abuse in their intimate partnerships. Our comprehensive services are multilingual, with specific English/Spanish capacity, and completely free of charge. Our expert intervention and prevention services reach more than 50,000 community members each year. Calling a crisis line is often the first step for a victim of domestic violence to reach out for help. Through our two (2) 24-hour Crisis Phone Lines we are able to provide callers with statewide, toll-free support, crisis counseling and information about community resources and services. La Casa Family Advocates are also on-site with the San Francisco Police Department's Domestic Violence Response Unit, at what is often the first point of access for domestic violence victims. Through the Domestic Violence Response Team, our Advocates accompany officers in responding to crime scene calls, follow up on police and medical reports indicating violent crimes against women, and assist medical personnel responding to abuse. Advocates provide crisis intervention and help professionals to identify victims’ needs, encourage victims’ safety and facilitate their access to services. Skilled legal service coordination also ensures victims’ civil legal needs, like restraining orders, receive immediate attention. La Casa also has the capacity to shelter and provide comprehensive advocacy and support services to 35 women and children per night. Our 8-week Emergency Shelter Program emphasizes independent living skills and individual counseling, support groups and vocational/educational referrals to reverse the isolation caused by domestic violence. Family Advocates assist each woman and her children with counseling, referrals, court and social service accompaniment, advocacy re legal, housing, job training and placement, financial and medical needs. The shelter program also utilizes family-based interventions, working with women and their children together as a family unit to strengthen families in crisis and break the intergenerational cycle of violence. Our collaborative model supports mothers in providing positive and developmentally enriching experiences for their children through mother/child playgroups; individual counseling; art and movement therapies; and day care, after-school and day camp programs. Through the Drop-In Counseling Center La Casa is able to meet the initial and ongoing needs of battered women and their children. Drop-In Counseling Center staff provide individual counseling and facilitate support groups for women who have left the shelter but wish to continue their counseling sessions and women who are not seeking emergency shelter, but who wish to address the impact of domestic violence on their lives. Child-centered clinical counseling is also available through La Casa’s Intern Program and in collaboration with San Francisco General Hospital’s nationally-reknowned Child Trauma Research Project. In addition, resource advocacy, referrals, emergency food and clothing are available. The Safe Havens Project, a collaboration with the San Francisco Unified Family Court and Saint Francis Memorial Hospital’s Rally Visitation Program, enables La Casa to address the needs of domestic violence victims as they develop and implement custody arrangements with their batterers. La Casa’s Advocate assists survivors in realizing shared custody and visitation schedules, where they are ordered by the Court, that prioritize the parent and children’s safety while providing support navigating what can be an intimidating and punitive system. La Casa’s Teen Program provides adolescent-appropriate intervention and prevention services to battered and at-risk youth and their children/siblings. Using La Casa's basic service model, counselors assist each teen client with individual counseling, support groups, court and social service accompaniment, advocacy regarding legal, housing, financial and medical needs, and referrals for job training and placement. Our Teen Advocates are available at our Drop-In Counseling Center and also hold counseling hours at nine (9) San Francisco high schools to facilitate support for adolescents. Interaction focuses on helping teens recognize potentially abusive relationships, better understand what creates a healthy relationship, and gain an understanding of how the "Cycle of Violence" may apply to their lives. La Casa's on-site Case Management Programs support up to 158 residents of two single women’s transitional/permanent housing facilities in the Tenderloin—the Mary Elizabeth Inn and Verona Hotel. Offering housing stability and emotional support services, the case managers provides advocacy, counseling and referrals to help formerly homeless residents sustain independent housing, build skills and community, and continue to move through the healing process, while building permanently violence free lives. The Safe Housing Project is working to empower residents of San Francisco’s permanent supportive housing sites to create communities that foster and demand violence free lives. Originating from the San Francisco Family Supportive Housing Network member sites’ articulated need to systematically address domestic violence, the program brings La Casa’s expertise onsite—through widespread outreach, staff and resident education, community-building efforts, site-specific direct service designs and relevant policy review and advocacy—to raise awareness of abuse, its effects and alternatives, provide tailored support, and help residents build a community, from within, that does not tolerate violence. An integral adjunct to our direct services, La Casa’s Community Education and Outreach Program provides outreach to media, schools, corporations and community groups. Program activities seek to prevent domestic violence among teens and adults, give voice to silenced victims of domestic violence, and motivate social change through community education and public awareness.

Community Stories

73 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

Volunteer

Rating: 5

Last year before I started volunteering for La Casa De Las Madres I took the DV training that they offer. I have learned enormous amount of information from different fields related to domestic violence. Now I am happy to volunteer at the events representing La Casa De Las Madres and their services. I have closely been working with Kara Duggan and Andrea Diaz all that time. They both are wonderful! They have been supporting me and helping me tremendously.
La Casa De Las Madres is GREAT!!!

1

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I started volunteering with La Casa in February, after moving to San Francisco six months prior. The training was comprehensive, and a wonderful introduction to services, resources, and non-profits throughout the city. It helped me to connect to a new urban landscape and commit to helping to make positive change. Working at the shelter has been incredibly uplifting - the opportunity to work and play with these women and their families has been joyful and heart-warming. It's a privilege and a pleasure to volunteer with La Casa.

3

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 5

I came to La Casa after working for 2 years as a volunteer at the emergency shelter. I enjoyed my volunteer experience so much that I chose to commit myself full-time to the work of La Casa. I have consistently been impressed by the unrelenting focus of the organization on eliminating domestic violence in the Bay Area.

As both an employee and volunteer, I have always felt respected, well-managed and challenged…

5

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 5

La Casa has a rich history of advocating and assisting domestic violence survivors in our community. I am proud to work for an organization that continues to strive towards a violence-free future.

I have worked for La Casa for almost 3 years. During my time here I have advanced professionally and continue to learn and be challenged. La Casa continues to support my development in the field and acknowledge my contribution to the team. I appreciate immensely the team-work mentality. I have felt supported and nurtured by all staff, including the management team.

4

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 5

La Casa de las Madres is a great place to work. In my time at La Casa I have been continuously supported by the Executive Director as well as the management team. In fact, the entire staff works collaboratively and effectively to ensure success of this program. I continue to see my own growth as well as the growth of other employees with all the training and development opportunities we are given. I know my continued work at La Casa is not only appreciated and acknowledged by managers and directors, but also the community served.

10

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 1

La Casa has a wonderful history in the community of helping domestic violence survivor women and children. The employees are passionate about the work they do.

There is an excessive amount of turnover for a reason, and it is easy to understand why there are lawsuits against this organization.

The value of any given employee's expertise and skills is of no relevance or interest to management. Over-bearing micromanagement does not make space for employees to serve the clients the mission sets out to assist. Experts in their field, the passionate employees of La Casa are not trusted to perform their job functions by the ED, who walks through the office each day muttering put downs and setting the office tone of tension and fear. The Associate Director reorganizes the development associates desk while they are trying to perform their job functions, and criticizes what and how most phone calls are handled, so that 4 people have held the position within year's time. The most recently 'promoted' Program Manager has insufficient experience to perform the work the position requires. She makes inappropriate comments about crashing employees weddings, complains most days of being tired and leaves early, though she doesn't appear to work most of the day, and rather than scheduling content related to the La Casa mission for staff meetings, has a food pantry coming for 6 hour and half sessions to make food since she like to eat.

Volunteers are considered warm bodies to patch the holes left with so much employee turnover, and there is utterly no appreciation for their dedication and time .

A solution to the ongoing crisis at the agency with the oldest domestic violence shelter in California would be to clean house, starting from the top. The governing board really needs to consider seriously the employment turnover and examine carefully what is happening inside the organization domestic violence survivors think of when they need help, and further, consider how these clients' needs are being met when the staff and volunteers are disregarded so frivolously. This 40 year old organization will quickly crumble if new leadership and organizational restructuring is not implemented soon.

Review from Guidestar

4

Volunteer

Rating: 5

We were evicted from our home in July and I am in desperate need of help to find a place for my family and i

9

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 5

I came to La Casa de las Madres in 2006 without any experience in the field, but a passion to help empower women and children to live a life free from violence. I'm very dishearten by some of the comments below about upper management and Kathy Black. When I came to this agency without any experience Kathy give me the opportunity to learn and grow within the agency. It's extremely disheartening that individuals who claim to value and love the work La Casa does have launched a full on character assassination via cyber bullying to further their own agenda. I believe in change, it's good for growth in every aspect of life. I do not agree with the changes that are being vocalized here. I am one of the many non-management employees of La Casa who's views and opinions are not represented in the so called anonymous survey. I'm sadden by the agenda behind the survey. The survey results do not accurately reflect all of La Casa's current or former staff. As a current employee I was never asked to participate in an anonymous survey. I want to make this very clear I was not approached by Kathy or upper management to write this, so please do not take my comments with a grain of salt or try to devaluated my experience.

14

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 1

Unfortunately, I had to leave La Casa about a year ago now. Although, I really valued the work I was doing, I was disgusted by the work culture and the way management treats staff. In my 3 years with the organization, I have heard the executive director call her employees “sissy,” state that they are “replaceable,” and talk poorly about staff members behind their back, often times breaching staff confidentiality. I have witnessed really competent employees getting fired for speaking up to management. Working at the Drop-in Center was like walking on eggshells. The irony of working at a domestic violence agency when your ED has the biggest power trips and verbally abuses her employees.

I remember when my coworkers and I addressed our concerns during a staff meeting because we were understaffed which not only put a lot of stress on the advocates fulfilling multiple roles, but also affected the services that are being delivered because clients are waiting or be told to call back because there is not enough staff to be attending to the crisis line, seeing clients, and covering the reception at the same time. My concerns were never addressed and I was told that I couldn’t speak at the meetings anymore. Wow, so much for having an open door policy.

La Casa has so much potential and the staff do such important work that it’s a shame the way their employees are being treated. As a former employee, I was also active in trying to reach out to the board of directors to schedule a meeting, but unfortunately we got no active response, which causes me to question the relationship between the ED and the board. Something needs to change because La Casa has one of the highest turnover rates for a non-profit. It’s funny how understaffed and how slow they are to replace employees, but the ED is making over $140,000. Something’s wrong with this picture.

9

Volunteer

Rating: 5

As a weekly volunteer at La Casa’s shelter for the past fifteen months, my experience with every person in the organization, including Kathy Black, has been outstanding and truly an honor. Each staff person I’ve come to know genuinely cares about our clients and makes every attempt to serve in the most caring, sensitive and personal way. Dedicating some of my free time each week to La Casa is my small way to serve women and children who have experienced domestic violence—these women and families deserve to be treated with respect, kindness, and dignity—the La Casa way is a culture of caring and support.
As the owner of a Mission district business for over 20 years, I know how challenging it can be when one or a few disaffected, divisive former employees are unwilling to move on in a positive way. At a place like La Casa, that kind of negativity will not interrupt or diminish the exalted work being done at this incredible organization…it energizes us and engenders a steely resolve to protect the positive good that comes daily from every caring interaction.