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High Atlas Foundation

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Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Economic Development, Environment, International, International Agricultural Development, International Economic Development, Microfinance

Mission: Developing a self-sustaining future for Morocco

Programs: Establish and development projects in different parts of morocco that local communities design and manage, and that are in partnership with government and non-government agencies

Community Stories

43 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I have spent the past three weeks as a volunteer for the High Atlas Foundation helping HAF in its effort improve the lives of nomadic populations in Eastern Morocco by teaching them to grow high value crops. HAF has developed an effective business model, growing transplants in nurseries it has established in schools and youth support centers, distributing them to family farmers and teaching them modern crop growing techniques. Along the way, the trees help disadvantaged children learn a new vocation, help the nomadic people attain more settled and prosperous lives, and remove thousands of tons of carbon from the atmosphere as productive orchards are established on the edge of the Sahara.
My first stop was at the Center for the Protection of Children in Oujda, a mid-sized city about 60 kilometers from the Mediterranean coast. The Center provides housing and vocational education to children ranging from twelve to eighteen years of age who have been convicted of minor crimes, as well as orphans and abandoned children. High Atlas is in the process of installing a nursery at the Center, capable of growing up to 40,000 trees, where the children will receive valuable hands-on training in farming and will experience the profound therapeutic effects of tending to living plants.
But there are technical problems. The well that supplies water to the Center does not have adequate capacity to supply the nursery and drilling a new one is prohibitively expensive. The current well can be deepened at reasonable cost, but it is unclear how much additional water this will produce. While at the Center I helped High Atlas staff develop a plan to upgrade the well, size the nursery to match the output of the upgraded well and design a drip irrigation system to make efficient use of every drop the well produces. The plan has been finalized and we expect the nursery to be in full production early next year.
After saying goodbye to the children in Oujda our small team headed inland to Bouarfa, the capital of Figuig Province. Bouarfa is the cultural hub of the Bni Guil nomadic tribe, which has tended sheep in Eastern Morocco for over ten centuries. The nomadic life is harsh, and has become more difficult in the past few decades as changes in Morocco’s climate have made surface water more difficult to find and the closing of the Algerian border has hurt the local economy. In the past several years the Provincial government has helped the nomads by giving them land and training to diversify their sheep herding income with farming. It is against this backdrop that we arrived in Bouarfa to help the farmers use drip irrigation to grow high value organic crops with scarce desert resources, and to find homes for some 50,000 fruit and nut trees from High Atlas nurseries.
The farms we visited are small and remote: many less than three hectares, family managed and over fifteen kilometers from the nearest paved road. The government has helped the farmers drill wells and install solar powered pumps which are perfect for this place where the sun is always present and electricity is scarce. The region has good soil, plenty of sun, and the desert surroundings hide the fact ground water is plentiful - in some places only three meters below the surface. The farmers are hard-working and eager to create a better life through growing crops, but they need help. Many are new to crop production and information is hard to find in this remote region. They lack both the resources and experience required to adopt environment-friendly, world-class farming practices.
After gathering information, we began work on a plan to transition the farmers from their current use of inefficient flood irrigation to resource-efficient drip systems and to provide them with High Atlas Foundation transplants that were raised in places like the Center for the Protection of Children in Oujda. The plan includes a unique training program catered to specific local needs, drip irrigation equipment and the transplants themselves. Once funded it will enable these small family farmers, less than a generation away from nomadic life, to grow export-quality organic produce using cutting edge irrigation technology.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I have recently returned from a most rewarding volunteer assignment with High Atlas Foundation. HAF had asked me to assess their tree nursery business and to develop a business plan that would guide their efforts. I spent three weeks with HAF in Marrkech, Morocco, interspersed with three day-trips to nurseries and a wholesale fruit and vegetable market.

HAF utilizes volunteers frequently. In fact while I was working with them there were three other US-based late career volunteers and half a dozen university volunteers from Europe, Israel, and Morocco.

I suspect that I learned as much from HAF as they learned from me - - great synergy. I look forward to another assignment with this fine organization.

Volunteer

Rating: 4

High Atlas Foundation is a great example for other organisations to follow. It is home to international staff and volunteers that are passionate for helping others. HAF does it by creating a pleasant environment for the staff in order to maximise their productivity. HAF is not shy from taking intitiatives in challenging projects that directly improves people’s lives. I am very thankful for HAF for giving me a space to share my knowledge with my colleagues in a helpful manner.

Volunteer

Rating: 4

The High Atlas Foundation has an entrepreneurial spirit and desire to explore new opportunities that made working with them a gratifying experience. The team members are open, helpful and genuinely care about their mission and the broader part they play in Morocco's social and environmental development. As with most small organizations, information and knowledge is usually housed with individual members but there was never a time that someone wasn't not willing to sit down then or schedule a time. A truly wonderful experience and great way to experience Morocco.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

Great non-profits are those focused on greater concern; those with a broader scope. The High Atlas Foundation is one of those. It doesn't matter if a non-profit is large or small, it matters if they are willing to concentrate on larger outcomes that will have bigger affect. HAF, through small, or better yet intimate, devotes their energy in a way that seeks bigger, more affecting, outcomes. A small package doing bigger things...they are punching well above their weight. Easy to work with, they are welcoming to volunteers and work hard to make every moment important. I would highly recommend working with them...helping to affect real and positive change.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

The projects that HAF is doing are truly amazing, and its employees are very dedicated to its mission.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

The High Atlas Foundation is an amazing and inspiring organization. I have been fortunate to work with many non profits on five continents, and I will say in a heartbeat that the High Atlas Foundation is by far the most effective. The first thing that stuck me about the HAF office is how the majority of the staff is Moroccan. This is significant because many NGOs operating in other countries have westerns staffing them, and this can lead to cultural barriers. This small example is just one of many that show how the High Atlas Foundation works so hard to empower the people of Morocco. The HAF staff works tirelessly, and the work that they do is equivalent to their personal passion. It is also worth mentioning that the relationships HAF has with the communities it works in is amazing, and that they truly make differences in the countless communities they work in. Dr. Yossef Ben-Meir, the founder and president of HAF is an expert at the participatory approach to development, and it is used in all of the projects HAF implements. It is worth saying that not once in my 7 months with the organization did I feel that HAF was imposing it's ideas and goals on communities, instead they were working with communities every step of the way to hep them achieve their own dreams. I would highly recommend supporting this extraordinary organization.

Advisor

Rating: 4

Having spend two weeks with HAF, I was quite impressed with the scope of their work and the zeel that they bring to their efforts. Sans the technical details, they were willing to accept advice and learn from others. These comments apply to my work advising on their nurseries and in their office completing the required paperwork.

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 5

My name is Tim Ager I spent 2 weeks in Morocco under a USAID sponsored Farmer-to-Farmer program, in Marrakesh and Fez. I worked closely with the High Atlas Foundation (HAF) and everyone involved was professional, helpful and extremely friendly. They facilitated in making my assignment successful, and I would not hesitate to work with them again. I found HAF to be a well run organization with great morale and camaraderie among the staff - who all enthusiastically welcomed me and made me feel at home.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I spent 2 weeks in Morocco under a USAID sponsored Farmer-to-Farmer program, in Marrakesh and Fez. I worked closely with the High Atlas Foundation (HAF) and everyone involved was professional, helpful and extremely friendly. They facilitated in making my assignment successful, and I would not hesitate to work with them again. I found HAF to be a well run organization with great morale and camaraderie among the staff - who all enthusiastically welcomed me and made me feel at home.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

In an arid country like Morocco water is exceptionally precious. Water is available in some places but hard to access. High Atlas Foundation is dedicated to expanding orchards of all kinds through its series of tree nurseries which it then contributes to interested farmers. High Atlas Foundation quickly learned that without water these orchards would not survive. They have now expanded their work to include acquiring water, designing drip irrigation systems and generally doing what is necessary to fund and grow successful tree crops.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I served as a volunteer for over two weeks for the High Atlas Foundation (HAF) in Marrakesh, Morocco. The purpose was to assess the operations of their tree nurseries and to make recommendations on improvements in their nursery operations and tree distribution programs to rural households. I worked closely with the staff and traveled to the field to observe the operations of the HAF. I found the staff motivated to work with me and include me in their activities. I observed their nurseries in several locations and saw first hand how they produce and deliver tree samplings (almond and walnut) to villagers. I was impressed by their work with women cooperatives and building their capacity to improve their status and household livelihoods by producing Calendula for L'Oriel in Paris. I would strongly recommend HAF to anyone who wants a volunteer assignment in a great country, very cordial and polite people, and work that is both satisfying and rewarding. Gregory Sullivan, USAID Farmer to Farmer volunteer for International Executive Service Corp (IESC), Washington, D.C. USA

Volunteer

Rating: 5

Moroccans and Foreigners Working Together

By Said El Bennani, HAF Project Manager

Each person is shaped by his own unique life experiences. One pivotal experience in my life that helped me to truly understand what it means to be an engaged, contributing member of society was my internship with the High Atlas Foundation.
In 2010 I moved from my hometown of Kelaa M’Gouna in southeastern Morocco to Marrakech to study at Cadi Ayyad University. I graduated in 2014 with a bachelor’s degree in geography. Normally students of geography travel throughout the country to study the topography, but unfortunately my studies were confined to just the classroom.
After graduating from university, I interned for three months with a government agricultural office in Marrakech. During this time, I worked with agricultural experts and visited farmers in their fields in Al Haouze Province. I also participated in field and theoretical trainings. I was finally able to study the physical land that I had only read about in books during university! It was very exciting for me to see first hand how Morocco’s unique geography plays a key role in our country’s development and economy.
Being in the field gave me an opportunity to learn from the local people and to hear about their experiences. It was during this time that I first heard about HAF’s work. HAF already had active projects in Al Haouze where I visited with my colleagues. However, at the time, I did not know very much about HAF and was not aware of the scope of their work.

In Marrakech I met several foreigners, including one person who asked me about my career aspirations. After I mentioned my experience interning at the government agricultural office, the foreigner told me about HAF and encouraged me to look at their website.
After hearing about the High Atlas Foundation from farmers, co-workers, and even a foreign tourist, it was clear that I needed to find out more about this organization. In February 2016, shortly after finishing my first internship, I visited HAF’s office. Fatima Zahra Laaribi, the office manager, was the first person I met at HAF. The way she greeted me greatly surprised me! She was very friendly and very kind. Eventually I was invited back for an interview to discuss my background, experience and interests. I also had the privilege of meeting HAF’s president, Dr. Yossef Ben-Meir, whose down-to-earth, humble demeanor made an impression on me.

February 8, 2016 was my very first day as an intern at HAF, and I remember that day well. The office was already buzzing with many foreign interns and volunteers who were all congregated in one room while I sat with other office staff in another room. I was sure that I would have a chance to learn new skills and gain valuable experience with this international team. That day I was the only Moroccan intern and it was a little difficult for me to work with all the foreigners due to the language and cultural differences. Dr. Ben-Meir took notice of the fact that I was the only Moroccan amidst the group of foreigners and encouraged all of us to learn about and from each other, share our experiences and skills, and contribute to each other’s work. We took Dr. Ben-Meir’s suggestion to heart and discovered that together, we made a stronger, more effective team, forming strong bonds and friendships as we worked together on projects such as building a new outdoor structure that provides shade from the hot sun for women who work in the fields in the countryside. One example of successful cross-cultural collaboration was my experience working with one of the foreign interns who had also studied geography in her native country. She was very knowledgeable about geographic information system (GIS). My own knowledge of GIS was more limited, so I was able to learn from her and together we made maps of HAF project sites.
During my HAF internship, I was very fortunate to closely observe the president, Dr. Ben-Meir, perform his work and to learn many valuable and useful things from him. For example, I noticed how he is able to effectively communicate and connect with both the local people and the local administrators. He introduced me to community leaders throughout the country and also to many foreigners who are committed to promoting economic development in Morocco. I visited most of HAF’s project sites which provided invaluable insight into both the successes and benefits of the projects as well as the challenges.
I returned to Al Haouze in January 2017 to help distribute trees in schools for HAF’s big, annual tree planting celebration. It was a joy-filled experience planting trees with the students and teaching them how to care for the trees and how to appreciate and respect nature and the environment. Seeing their genuine interest in the tree planting project was very gratifying and I realized that I really enjoy this type of work.
HAF’s work has benefitted even my hometown, where trees were sent on behalf of HAF to my former primary school. When I studied there as a young child, there were no trees at the school. Now the school has its own well and enough water to take care of trees. I am very happy that the students at my former primary school had an opportunity to receive trees and learn about taking care of them, which I never had a chance to do when I was their age.

My dream job is to manage a major project in my country of Morocco and devote my time and energy to helping people gain the necessary skills and experience to earn sustainable incomes, thereby supporting and strengthening their families and their communities. My HAF internship prepared me well to carry out this work. In May 2017 I will move to Fes in northern Morocco to oversee HAF projects in that region. To say that I am excited about this opportunity is an understatement. I feel truly blessed and am honored and humbled to be able to help my fellow Moroccan citizens by doing this work. I also am very grateful for the people at HAF who are not only my work colleagues but also my good friends. Working with the HAF team has been a special and life-changing opportunity.
In closing, I wish to thank Dr. Ben-Meir for his life work and all that he has done and is doing to help Moroccans improve their standard of living and be self-sufficient. I also wish to thank the amazing, dedicated HAF team, including the interns and volunteers from Morocco and from all over the world, for welcoming me so warmly and teaching me how to be part of a multicultural team. I have learned that we can all benefit from collaborating together and respecting each other’s differences. I appreciate each person at HAF very much and thank everyone for the wonderful opportunities to join the important work of creating a more prosperous Morocco.

Volunteer

Rating: 4

My experience with HAF was the best experience ever, I have learned too many things: Self-motivation ...., and the circumstances were good enough to make some new friendships with the other volunteers, The cop 22 was a good opportunity for me to discover a new world of business , politics ...
I would like to thank HAF for giving me the chance to be one of its volunteers, If you want to try some of the voluntary work, HAF is the best place for you.
Nouhaila

Volunteer

Rating: 4

My volunteer experience with HAF was amazing! I learned a lot of things during three months, I was taking pictures in many different events and activities, and this reminds me of the great moments I spent in the international event COP22. It helped me to develop my personality and have the ability to talk to strangers with various languages Arabic, French, English and sometimes Amazigh, I was also an active member in the office with so many volunteers that I am glad to know.
I would like to thank HAF for giving me the opportunity to experience new things and know more about myself.
Sakina

Kerstin F.

Volunteer

Rating: 4

"Morocco is a country that reveals its essence only to those who take the time to draw water and to pour a pot of tea."
- Moroccan Proverb

Time and tea - the two magic words in Morocco. Two of the most important lessons you will eventually learn in Morocco are that everything takes time, just be patient and to never say no to a cup of tea. Over the last 3 months I had the pleasure to work with the High Atlas Foundation and live in this wonderful and diverse country. I came here with the objective to experience the day-to-day life of a conservationist, to gain practical knowledge in the field of conservation and sustainable development and to truly get to know the Moroccan culture by living in it. Without any doubt, this time was one of the most valuable experiences that fully reinforced my plans to work in conservation and rural development as well as to continue my carrier in Morocco.
Within my time at the High Atlas Foundation I reviewed proposals and matched donor interests to High Atlas Foundation projects. I established multiple project descriptions on the fundraising platform Global Giving and by this gained an in-depth understanding of the diverse range of projects the High Atlas Foundation conducts. Additionally I had the opportunity to evaluate Sami’s Project, a project that aims to facilitate environmental education of children and enhance school infrastructure. For that I visited 15 schools in the Al Haouz province near Marrakech, questioned teachers and students and examined tree vitality and water supply. Seeing the glance in the children’s eyes when they talked about the tree planting event gave me great joy. It was a great pleasure to see the literal fruits of HAF’s hard work over the past years.
Furthermore, I accompanied HAF’s President Dr. Yossef Ben-Meir and the retired Peace Corps Country Director of Morocco, Ellen Paquette, to a business trip around Morocco. This trip taught me that working in sustainable development is not only about professional expertise but also means to be diplomatic, emphasize networking and meeting people, discussing, introducing ideas and learning how to deal with setbacks and money shortcomings. One of my personal highlights was the distribution of a thousand trees in the commune Zerkten in the High Atlas Mountains. Seeing the farmer’s thankfulness and appreciation gave me great trust that they will take good care of the trees so that they will grow up to be strong and healthy.
However, I did not only learn a lot about sustainability and conservation of biodiversity, but I was also completely overwhelmed by the generosity and hospitality of the Moroccan people. I made good and true friends in the office and outside the office, who treated me like a dear sister and directly involved me in their life. From the first week on I got countless invitations from their families, probably more than I got in Germany in a whole year. Everywhere I went, I was welcomed most warmly and treated with incredible hospitality. In general there was not one day, where I felt lonely or out of place, because there were always friends around to join me for dinner or a stroll through the medina or even just a good conversation with a friendly women in the bus or the public Hammam. One experience especially moved me: It was when I travelled back to Marrakech in the early morning after a weekend trip to the mountains. Next to me sat a women, who was travelling to Casablanca and we had a very funny conversation, because we used a mix of Arabic, French and sign language to understand each other. Shortly before we arrived Marrakech she gave me two eggs for breakfast, the only eggs she had with her. I was moved by her generosity, because she had a far longer trip, but she gave me her provision anyway. And that’s essentially Moroccan hospitality: they show you their appreciation by giving you food, lots of food. If they feel you are not eating enough, they will persuade you to eat more and trying to trick them by eating slow will not work for sure. Food is, just like tea, a form of Moroccan appreciation that you should acknowledge and cherish.
Morocco is a land of countless possibilities, a country that will surprise you every day and of amazing, astonishing beauty that will keep you breathless. From days, where the bright sunlight warms up the city, to intense snow storms in the desert or heavy rainfalls that turn streets into rivers, I experienced everything. I also experienced the unbreakable spirit of young Moroccans and their urge to change their country for the better. Morocco is a country that undergoes massive, but peaceful changes, be it in the transition from subsistence agriculture to cash crop farming, the empowerment of women or the decentralisation and democratisation. Being part in this process of sustainable development was a true honour and a priceless experience that propels me to pursue my postgraduate studies in Conservation Biology, but always with the goal in mind to apply my newly gained knowledge in Morocco. It is hard finding the right words to describe my love for this country and its residents, who gave me more than I can ever repay and leaving feels close to impossible. I will indescribably miss the chaotic hustle and bustle of Marrakech’s medina with all its colours and scents, I will miss drinking more than my body weight in sugary mint tea, I will miss hiking through the peaceful countryside of the true Morocco and I will even miss waking up at 5 o’ clock in the morning from the melodic but noisy prayer call. Morocco was an incredibly experience. At times, it was trying, chaotic, and overloaded my senses, but for all the stresses of adjusting to a new culture, it was a country where I felt completely in my element and at home. A big thank you to the High Atlas Foundation and all the people I met during my stay. You made my time in Morocco so much more valuable and gave me more than I can ever repay. I will always keep you in my heart and be forever grateful for meeting you. Thank you.

Marwa N.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

COP22 was a successful opportunity for High Atlas Foundation, for Morocco, and even for myself; to expand the business network, to learn from international initiatives and creative ideas. Moreover, it was an awakening event for everyone to get aware to act on climate change, and to get whatever it takes to save our planet. In addition, attending the “Women’s Earth and Climate Action Network” event was very valuable for me as I heard international stories of indigenous women fighting climate change all over the world making it an international cause, getting to know that I myself can do something, feeling strong with them.
Marwa

1

Volunteer

Rating: 5

No education is complet without experience. My experience during my two months internship with High Atlas Foundation (HAF) as Intern coordinator was an amazing and rewarding experience. I had the pleasure to meet and work with great staff and volunteers.My role within HAF is coordinating between staff and volunteers and help in the process of recruiting interns. .I cannot thank you all HAF staff enough for everything you taught me while working as your intern coordinator. With this experience I learned organizational skills and sharpen them . I greatly value your kindness and the expertise you imparted to me.

You taught me so many things that went far beyond the theoretical knowledge I gained in other NGOs. I learned to carefully observe and give much more important to details and always being there for interns for any issues. Working with HAf was also an added value to my career in cross culture as I had the chance to meet with other interns from other cultures and nationalities and interact with them and build a great relationship with them. HAF is a distinguished NGO and it is the kind of NGO that Morocco are in need of due to the incredible work they do in rural areas.HAF not only distinguished NGO but also a unique one because of the innovative and productive it uses in developing projects which the participatory approach. So if you are looking for great opportunity and you are passion with rural development then HAF is the best NGO to experience this and also meet and work with an awesome and supportive staff .

4

Volunteer

Rating: 5

High Atlas Foundation had been a place where I got an amazing experience. In parallel with my English studies in Faculty of Humanities, Marrakech, I was a student in HAF for 7 months. I started out working on a business plan, then my manager had changed it to do interviews with farmers almost all arround Morocco.

The fact that I had interacted with new people from my country and from other countries, such as the US, France, Germany..... in the foundation had made it a multi cultural place! You can imagine this while we were eating from the same dish of Couscous! talking; discussing different topics altogether! I have learnt English and practise it with native speakers, this was my chance. I have learnt somehow how to do a business plan, especially how cite and avoid plagiarism, how to do researches ... and so on so forth

Then, I moved to do interviews with farmers to know the problems they have, how they grow their crops and where they sell them and what are the problems they face while selling, also we had given them some solutions... This has helped HAF to know how to deal with farmers and find it easy to get to help them to develop their skills.

All the team starting from Mr Yossef, the president to everyone has a role in HAF were so nice to me and helped me to develop myself and all the time they were aware about my studies.

If you think you can help HAF to keep going, you are thinking well. HAF was and still for me a great place and I would be so happy to get to help them any time.

This to say, that we need organizations like HAF everywhere, because they get in touch with poeple in order to be closer and know what do people undergo. I have a vivid example, HAF had been in touch,and for sure they are still , with wome women in Ourika,Marrakech and help them to have an authorized cooperation to sell their product, they helped them also to have land and plant organic almond trees... I still vividly remember those active women and how they liked eveything HAF had suggested.

Thank you THE WHOLE NICE TEAM of HAF.

OUAJIB

5

Volunteer

Rating: 5

After more than three years of study I felt the desperate need to get out of my common environment and way of thinking. This was one of the reasons why I wanted to come to Morocco and volunteer with the High Atlas Foundation for ten weeks. I wanted to learn about a new country, a new culture and maybe also about myself.

In the last three months, I fell in love with this beautiful country and I guess a lot of my affection is due to the warm and welcoming culture that I experienced at the High Atlas Foundation. My internship was mainly for GIS (Geographical Information Systems) and I created some overview maps about HAF’s project sites as well as more detailed maps for specific projects and campaigns. By creating those maps, I got to know a huge amount about what kind of projects the High Atlas Foundation is working on and where they are located. It also made me more aware about the geography of Morocco and which cities I might visit! The following example shows a map displaying information about the 2016 planting campaign.

Apart from GIS, I was happy to help with anything else that has been needed. I was always informed about the recent activities of HAF and gained new technical skills while working on social media and the website.

I had the chance to work closely together with the President Dr. Yossef Ben-Meir. I supported him in writing letters, campaigns and papers as well as accompanied him travelling to different events. At the Sister Park signing ceremony between the Great Basin National Park (USA) and the Toubkal National Park (Morocco), I learned a lot about environmental preservation in Morocco and experienced the beauty of the Toubkal National Park. I also had the honor to meet the High Commissioner of Water and Forests and the U.S. Ambassador to Morocco! Furthermore, I was able to accompany Dr. Ben-Meir to a Prioritizing Project at the SUPMTI University in Beni Mellal. Besides an interesting three-hour car drive – which made me get to know Yossef on a more personal level – I learned a lot about the way the High Atlas Foundation encourages young Moroccans to serve their society. Since I myself was not familiar with the prioritizing techniques taught in this seminar, it was a worthy experience for me.

The High Atlas Foundation also gave me the opportunity to see parts of Morocco which I would not have seen otherwise. Together with the Program Director Amina Elhajjami, I got to experience different parts of the Ourika Valley, where the High Atlas Foundation has tree nurseries. I learned a lot about the participatory approach and how organic certification can lead to sustainable development, while witnessing the gracefulness of Morocco’s landscape.

Looking back, in addition to the professional experiences I gained, the culture and the sincere involvement of all the staff made me appreciate volunteering for the High Atlas Foundation. From the first day I was not only included in the work that had to be done, but also in the team itself. Even though I do not speak Darija and not a lot of French, and even though there were times I did not understand anything, HAF staff and the other volunteers made me feel welcome and at home. Every day, except for Ramadan, we had tea breaks and shared our lunch in the comfortable environment of the office. At this point I want to spell out great thanks to Atika, who made me realize the amazing variety of meals you can have in Morocco! Shokran Atika! If I needed anything, or did not understand something – work related or not – Fatima-Zahra, Yossef and Amina would always be there to help me out. But not only the staff members, also all the amazing volunteers would be there for me. I was not only working with international but also lots of Moroccan interns, who guided me through the city, showed me nice cafés and places to be and tried to teach me some Darija!

They showed me their culture by inviting me to their homes, travelling with me, preparing a Ftour meal together during Ramadan, teaching me their language and by telling me about their lives. Something I will always remember is a weekend we spent in Kalat M’Gouna, for the Rose Festival and to visit two other volunteer’s hometowns and houses. Thank you for inviting all of us, Said and Jamal, and a great thanks to your families for warmly welcoming us in their homes.
I would never have experienced Morocco and its culture the way I did without the amazing people I met at our office. Inshallah, I will come back to this wonderful country not only once and meet all those beautiful minds again. It was a pleasure to work with you all!


My name is Nina Schmitz, I am 22 years old and from Aachen, Germany. This past March I just finished my Bachelor’s degree in Applied Geography, despite that I am enrolled at a Bachelor’s program in Environmental Engineering, both at RWTH Aachen University. In the last years I had the chance to travel and learn about different cultures and countries a lot. After graduating in March, I wanted to combine both – professional experience and exploring a new country. Doing my internship at the High Atlas Foundation gave me this opportunity that I was looking for. In October my Master’s Program in Applied Geography will start, and who knows what the future holds? Maybe I will come back to Morocco and the High Atlas Foundation to do research for my thesis.