Over 1.8 million nonprofits and charities for donors, volunteers and funders

2012 Top-Rated Nonprofit

Wildlife Rescue and Rehabilitation Inc

Claim This Nonprofit

More Info

Add to Favorites

Share this Nonprofit

Donate

Volunteering Oportunities

Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Animal Protection & Welfare, Animals, Wildlife Preservation & Protection, Wildlife Sanctuaries

Mission: To rescue, rehabilitate, and release native wildlife, and to provide sanctuary, individualized care, and a voice for other animals in need.

Results: In 2011, WRR rescued over 7,000 animals and fielded more than 6,000 calls on our emergency wildlife hotline while providing sanctuary to over 600 permanent residents.

Target demographics: General public

Direct beneficiaries per year: 6,000 wild animals and ~10,000 citizens

Programs: The organization received animals for rehabilitation and release back into the wild. It also provides a permanent home for approximately 600 resident, non-releasable indigenous wildlife, non-native wildlife and farmed animals.

Community Stories

2 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

Priscilla W.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I have volunteered for WRR for almost two years doing wildlife rescues, feeding babies, transporting wildlife, and participating in fundraising and other events. it is a wonderful organization which rescues animals in distress in a wide area around San Antonio, nurses them to health and releases them if they can be returned to the wild. They also are a sanctuary for local wildlife as well as exotic wildlife which cannot be returned to the wild. Employees and volunteers are quite dedicated to this cause and work long, hard hours to ensure that animals are cared for properly. I personally have rescued deer, squirrels, birds, skunks, opossums, raccoons, and other animals. I love the work and feel it is very rewarding to know I am giving these animals a chance to return to their natural habitat where they can prosper once again.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I interned at WRR for almost two years, and it will probably be one of the most memorable experiences of my life. WRR helped me learn so much about the species we cared for, and you were able to see the actual results of your care, whether it was weaning a baby cottontail off of milk (which is no easy feat), seeing a grackle mend a broken wing and fly again, or hacksawing a fence to save a trapped deer. WRR is incredibly ambitious in its desire to save lives and increase awareness. They are able to be so because of the incredible support they receive through the hard work of eager volunteers, the generous donations of members, and the long hours of constant care from interns and staff.