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Animal Humane Society

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Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Animal Protection & Welfare, Animals

Mission: To engage the hearts, hands and minds of the community to help animals.

Programs: Adoption and surrenderanimal humane society helps thousands of dogs, cats, and critters in need find loving homes each year - and no animal is ever turned away. Ahs takes in every animal surrendered regardless of its health, age, breed, or behavior. This commitment to open admission guarantees shelter and care to thousands of animals that would otherwise have no safe refuge. Although many animals can be placed in our adoption programs as soon as they are vaccinated and sterilized, others require specialized care to overcome health and behavior issues. Ahs provides extensive medical treatment, surgery, behavior modification, and foster care to those with special challenges, ensuring that even the most difficult-to-place animals have a chance at adoption. In the year ended june 30, 2015:23,072 companion animals came into ahs facilities; 20,847 of those animals - more than 91% - were placed in homes, reunited with owners, or released to other organizations. 12,078 animals received spay/neuter surgeries prior to adoption and an additional 13,340 animals were sterilized for other rescue groups by ahs and through ahs's partnership with kindest cut. Ahs behavior modification and rehabilitation programs readied 1,573 shy or fearful cats and dogs for placement.

community engagementanimal humane society works with individuals and organizations across minnesota to create a more humane world for animals. In the year ended june 30, 2015, those efforts included:outreach to under-engaged communities, including education programs and free or low-cost services that empower low-income pet owners and improve the lives of pets. These programs served more than 2,729 families in frogtown and east st. Paul. As a result, 1,481 animals received free spay/neuter surgeries and 1,015 pets were served at free wellness clinics. Education programs that foster humane values and compassion for animals, including day camps, a youth club, and other activities for kids and families. Ahs educational programs served 12,160 people, including 2,253 students through educational programs in schools and 1,110 in summer camps. A new community cats program focused on reducing euthanasia and providing alternative solutions for feral and free-roaming cats through return-to-field and trap-neuter-return programs. This program served 592 cats. A partnership with the wildlife rehabilitation center of minnesota that provided emergency care for 1,474 injured and orphaned wild animals. A robust volunteer program that enlists more than 2,400 active volunteers in providing animal enrichment, foster care, shelter support, and other assistance. Volunteers contributed 163,515 hours to ahs and provided foster care for 2,685 animals prior to adoption.

pet servicesahs offers programs to serve all stages of an animal's life, including:more than 80 family-friendly pet training classes each week, along with one-on-one training and socialization sessions, therapy animal courses, play groups, and rabbit agility classes. 1,261 pets attended classes through ahs's training school. A free pet helpline (952-help-pet) that handled 34,188 incoming calls, providing caring, compassionate advice and resources to help with everything from solving behavior problems to finding pet-friendly housing. Peace of mind pet boarding at animal house in golden valley, which served 2,971 pets. Compassionate end-of-life services and a weekly pet loss support group. Online resources for pet owners, including a lost pet bulletin board and behavior resource library at animalhumanesociety. Org.

rescueaiding animals in critical situations is core to ahs's work. Ahs's humane agents respond to reports of possible animal cruelty or neglect throughout minnesota. They receive reports about animals that are lacking proper food, water and shelter. They also participate in larger, more complex cases involving cruelty, with on-site investigations and seizures aiding law enforcement agencies that seek ahs assistance. During the year ended june 30, 2015, our humane investigations unit received 1,534 requests for assistance and opened 529 formal cases. Follow-up investigation of these cases took ahs agents into 64 counties across the state of minnesota. Those investigations impacted the lives of 4,666 animals. Ahs regularly worked with 114 animal welfare organizations throughout minnesota, north dakota, iowa, wisconsin and other states who need assistance when their facilities are overcrowded. Ahs also assists in cases of natural disasters.

Community Stories

9 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

Scott Slocum

Donor

Rating: 5

When companion animals are in need, they Animal Humane Society is there.

Donor

Rating: 5

It is a great nonprofit organization. They work very hard. They are also honest and good person. It is very difficult to serve this type subject but they do it perfectly with responsibly. They take better asset to their community. They always create new idea and also apply it. If anyone tell about any kind of negative things, it's not true. I think it is one of the most important for all of ours. So thanks AHS for their activate.

Donor

Rating: 5

This is a very wonderful, worthy nonprofit organization. They have new and innovative ideas. Some of these ideas have been implemented and are making a difference.

Previous Stories

Donor

Rating: 5

I am a donor/ Client Served/ General Member of the public. It's a shame that there are so many outpoken people who are negative to the AHS. They do wonderful work for both the community and the animals they serve. It is a difficult time for everyone with the economy and they are just one of the organizations that are trying to help make a difference to so many lives, both animal and people. They not only help unwanted/stray animals they help with education in the community and strive to provide enrichment programs to local organizations (schools and therapy). We can ill afford to put down such a dedicated group of people who work so tirelessly to serve so many.

I will ALWAYS continue to help support this organization both financially and through my speech and actions. I hope others will speak up for themselves and stop letting the minority speak for the majority through default!

These people should be ashamed of themselves. If you cannot help then I challenge you to help find a solution and stop just protesting. The old addage that if you aren't part of the solution then you are part of the problem definately applies.

Review from Guidestar

Rachelle B.

Donor

Rating: 5

The Animal Human Society is a wonderful asset to the community. Their support and care of animals is top notch. My experience with the Animal Humane Society is as a donor and pet adopter. Their pet loss support group was a huge help a few years ago when I lost my beloved cat. Since then, I have been a strong supporter of everything they do through donations and the Walk for Animals.

Review from Guidestar

Donor

Rating: 5

I have been both a donor and volunteer of the Animal Humane Society. It is at the top of my list of organizations I consider deserving of my contributions, and I always feel good when I write my check to AHS. Also, being a volunteer gives me a behind-the-scenes look at what the organization does.

It continues to amaze me all of the services the shelter provides - way more than the average member of the public could ever know. Two cats my family adopted from AHS had been hit by cars, and in both cases, the AHS invested time and resources to give those animals a second chance. One of the cats required the amputation of a leg, and the other required several weeks of treatment for a head injury.

For animals that are surrendered at the shelter but are too fearful or have behavior issues which need addressing before the animal goes up for adoption, AHS offers a socialization program where volunteers work one on one with those animals until they are ready for the adoption floor.

Many animals recovering from surgery are placed in volunteer foster homes until they are well enough to go on the adoption floor. All animals who are adopted have already been spayed or neutered to help address the overpopulation issues. The animals also have a microchip implant so they can be easily tracked should they get lost.

Once animals are adopted, AHS offers services to adopters including training classes and a help line. AHS even offers a support group for people who are grieving the loss of a pet.

AHS is sometimes critized because it is not a no-kill shelter. Unfortunately, though, there are many more unwanted and stray animals than there are available homes and shelters. No-kill shelters are also doing important work, but there is a limit to how many animals the no-kill shelters can take, meaning they aren't able to take in every animal that someone tries to surrender to them.

My sense as both a volunteer and donor is that AHS is very mission focused and is a wise steward of the financial resources it receives. Expenditures are made carefully, and the organization utilizes volunteers wherever it can to help keep expenses as low as possible and focused as much as possible on the care of the animals.

Donor

Rating: 5

I started as a volunteer at the Animal Humane Society in the 1980s. Between 1984 and 1996, we adopted three cats from them. Each time, we received help in selecting the best cat to fit our particular situation. We had a chance to visit with several different cats in private rooms and talk to volunteers who knew the cats. Twice we adopted adult cats, because the Society does not put an age limit on cats accepted for adoption. Also, animals who are on the adoption floor remain there until they are adopted; there is no "kill by" date. All adopted animals are now spayed/neutered before leaving the facility, one of the real ways we can attack the problem of stray and unwanted animals. The Society is currently raising money for a low-cost spay/neuter clinic in their Golden Valley building to serve people who already own pets but cannot afford the surgery.

I have also been a contributor to the Society, and have increased my donations as my circumstances have allowed. I like that the Society provides services to help adopters with their pets after the adoption: puppy training classes, advice on behavioral issues, and so on. I also like their program for taking carefully selected animals to assisted living/nursing homes: my elderly mother greatly benefitted from such visits. And finally, they provide many tours and education on proper care of animals for school groups; summer camps for children interested in animal-related careers, etc. I am constantly amazed at the range of services and programs that are available. Even a pet-loss support group when your pet has died. Are some animals euthanized? Yes, because some animals come in with overwhelming health issues, or are feral animals, and so on. But I would rather they be humanely euthanized than roam the streets and die from injury, hunger, or our cold winters.

People also need to know that the Animal Humane Society has two humane investigators who work with police around the state of Minnesota to investigate animal abuse, puppy "mills", animal hoarding situations, and so on. They are the only two full-time human investigators in the state.

The Animal Humane Society is my number 1 charity, and I support them completely.

Review from Guidestar

Donor

Rating: 5

I am a volunteer, donor and customer of the AHS. When I first started volunteering 8 years ago I was amazed by how much AHS does for the animals. This lead to me wanting to contribute to the organization as it is obvious that the majority of funding goes toward making the animals lives as pleasant as possible.
The staff is invested in the lives of the animals. All you have to do is ask them a questions about the animals and you can tell they love and care about each animal in the shelter.
Part of my volunteering involved 'vising' the animals that were sick so they would have socialization. AHS does everything possible to bring the animals back to health so they can be available for adoption.
The reality of euthanasia exists however it is not based on the amount of time an animal has been at the shelter or the age of the animal. Frankly I believe sometimes euthanasia is the humane answer for some animals. Because they accept all animals that show up at their door (unlike many shelters that turn animals away) they have animals that have terminal illnesses (leukemia) or behavioral problems (urinating in home, feral cats, etc). They go through a process with every animal to determine if the animal is appropriate for adoption.
I support this organization 100% and feel confident recommending them to anyone for donations, purchase of animals,or volunteer opportunities.

Review from Guidestar

Donor

Rating: 5

We have been doners to the animal humane society for over 30 years as well as being an adopter of 4 wonderful cats. We have also toured the Golden Valley facility which was a wonderful experience in seeing the generous love and care being given to these homeless animals.

Mr. and Mrs T

Review from Guidestar