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International Humanity Foundation

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Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Education, Food, Food, Agriculture & Nutrition, Human Services, Primary & Elementary Schools, Secondary & High Schools

Mission: The International Humanity Foundation (IHF) is an international non-religious, non-political, and non-profit organization that functions through the efforts of volunteers, sponsors, and an Executive Leadership team from all over the world. We use our five (5) IHF Centers to provide education and safe-homes to impoverished children in Indonesia, Kenya, and Thailand. We are dedicated to using education to change the world—one child and one volunteer at a time. Our Mission: To educate impoverished children—activating their highest potential—and educate global citizens, through real life experiences, about the realities of impoverished communities, the value of other cultures, and the many responsibilities of running an international NGO. Our Vision: To develop global leaders with cross-cultural experiences, and respect for different cultures, from differing socioeconomic backgrounds, who are equipped to make decisions that serve and positively impact, promote, and protect the dignity and humanity of people everywhere. Our 8 Core Values: Children always come first. We exist first and foremost to meet the needs of the children we serve. Education empowers. We believe that education unlocks the door to greater potential and empowers people to make good decisions that lead to a brighter future for all of humankind. Honesty is the only policy. Authenticity, sincerity, and transparency are not only paramount, they’re non-negotiable. Lead by example. We don’t point the finger and wait for others to take action, or only lead with our words; we are always ready to get our hands dirty and to show others how it’s done. Celebrate differences. There’s a reason we see differently, our differences are not a liability, they are our strength. Preserve culture. We are not here to impose our cultural values on others, we are here to learn as much as we are here to give. We encourage others to discover and protect the inherent value of other cultures. Leave your mark. Each person has something to contribute, each person can leave this world a little better than they found it. The best way to leave your mark is by serving others. Pass it on. We show our compassion for all of humanity when we take the time to teach others! Teaching children who may not otherwise have access to education, educating other people about the devastating effects of poverty around the world, and encouraging them to give and get involved are the best ways to pass it on and make a lasting impact.

Target demographics: Children and Young Adults

Direct beneficiaries per year: more than 1,000 children

Geographic areas served: Africa and Asia

Programs: The Education Program (TEP), Orphan Sponsorship, Medical Sponsorship, Class Sponsorship, and the Nakuru Peace Farm

Community Stories

104 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

Volunteer

Rating: 4

My name is Lange Wei. I’m the work study volunteer in Chiang Rai, Thailand for three weeks, and I very enjoy the time that I stay in here! Children are very friendly, active and creative. Although, the things I did every day are similar like cooking, picking up the children and cleaning, I don’t feel boring. Children always bring something new to you. I have more understandings about life by accompanying with children. We look like a big family. Now, I just have one week left, I think I’ll back to see them some day.

Volunteer

Rating: 4

My name is Kevin, and I am a work study volunteer at the Nakuru center. I have been volunteering at the center for the last month. I was interested in volunteering for many reasons. First, for a long time, I have had an interest in learning more about Africa. My major in school is international studies, with a focus on Africa and the Middle East. After learning about the work that IHF conducts, I knew this would be a worthwhile internship, and indeed it has been. The directors at the center are wonderful. They truly care about the kids, and work very hard to ensure that the kids are not only well taken care of, but that they also have access to school and health care. The directors work with the local community to build political and economic relationships that will continue to help the children and the center as a whole. I have assisted in this process, and it has been a wonderful opportunity. I have learned many things, including the difficulty and exhaustiveness of running an NGO, and how important it is to build rapport with local leaders. I will remember fondly my time with IHF Nakuru.

1

Volunteer

Rating: 3

About me: born and raised in China, attending university in California, studied abroad in London. Coffee junkie, vegetarian, environmentalist, human rights and gender equality advocate, jazz and tango lover, and crazy about dickens and shakespeare.

I learnt about International Humanity Foundation online. From a background of economics in college, I chose to come to a Southeast Asian country – Indonesia - to see the difficulty and potential of the economic and social development in one of the poorest places, and Bali in particular because I was interested in the huge economic inequality on an island thriving with tourism and traveler-oriented services - so far, Bali and IHF have delivered all my expectations.

Living in a small Indonesian village proved to be even more difficult than I thought. The level of underdevelopment is far worse than anything I have ever experienced. I have complained about the inconvenient living conditions and the often malfunctioning wifi. I have biked up the mountains on a recruitment trip and seen for myself the kind of mistrust the locals have in a US-based NGO like us. I have been constantly surprised by the local kids’ excitement upon seeing a foreigner and their lovely ‘hello’s and ‘good morning’s.

Volunteers at IHF Bali started an art project to decorate the center. We asked the kids to draw the ‘IHF hand’ on a piece of paper, write down their names and decorate the drawing as they wish. The kids dived right into it and created many remarkable drawings. Their creativity and imagination surprised me. Moreover, I was pleased to witness their excitement over such a small art project. Every day after the English classes, most volunteers complain about how hard it is to discipline the small kids and get them to focus on the class material. We college students are used to sitting in a lecture hall, staying concentrated for couple of hours and taking in as much information as we can. However we forgot that it is more important to encourage creativity in children. Many of them may not be good at following instructions, especially after a full school day, but they are eager for opportunities to show their individuality. In a collectivist country like Indonesia with strict cultural and religious constraints on personal choices, the small projects we create might give the kids the best moment in their day.

More than everything, I am deeply touched by some kids’ eager for knowledge and passion for English learning under an incomplete and shockingly corrupt public education system. This makes me realize that the free education provided by IHF Bali is working against the social norm and that we have a long way to go to prove our legitimacy and credibility. When we talk about NGOs and volunteering work in the US and other developed nations, we focus on the generosity of the donors and the sophisticated process of recruiting qualified volunteers, yet we have often forgotten the importance of reaching out to the locals and working our way best into the cultural and religious traditions in the area we work in. These traditions, however little merit they may have, are far more powerful in a country like Indonesia than our optimistic western ideology of free education, democracy, equality, and individual merits.

Many NGOs like IHF are great international efforts to relieve poverty and provide education opportunities, nevertheless we all need to realize that the overarching goal of our work is to serve the ‘local’ community, to benefit the ‘locals’, and through a long and hard time to influence the ‘local’ values in a positive way. And this is the hard part: to establish our trustworthiness in a remote Indonesian village and to get them to welcome our good intentions, however unrealistic they might seem to an Indonesian person. I am yet to reach this goal, but this one month experience at IHF Bali has definitely made the picture clear to me.

Volunteer

Rating: 4

My name is Fiona, and I am a Scottish student heading into the final year of a Politics degree. I found the International Humanity Foundation online, seeking an opportunity where I could be involved ‘on the ground’ but still gain experience of the internal workings of a grassroots organisation; IHF provided a perfect platform for this. IHF’s Bali center provides supplementary education to Indonesian students in an area otherwise dominated by tourism. Teaching Maths, English and Computing to students up to senior high school, IHF helps to plug the gap that state education creates. As part of a Work­Study placement I spent 4 hours a day doing local tasks such as preparing and teaching classes or spending time with students, and 4 hours completing International tasks as part of various IHF teams, including Media and Fundraising. From this experience not only have I gained insight to the workings of an NGO from different perspectives, but I have also learned a lot from the students; the local village is split into Hindu and Muslim halves, but live together harmoniously. Coming from a Western state which has infinite choices and opportunities, to find communities which exist using far less means really struck me ­ that an entire family can survive on selling fish at the roadside, for example, is a concept extremely abstract compared to our western perspective which is now ingrained to include laptops, mobile phones and SLR cameras as the norm, nevermind washing machines, televisions and cars. Additionally, I noticed that a lot of communities here have something which evades many families in western states ­ happiness and contentment. Happy to provide basic requirements for their families, and content with the lives they have built, while many western families are always yearning for the next thing; the next video game, the new Apple product, a sunnier holiday.

Volunteer

Rating: 4

My name is Wang Xiaochen, a year 3 undergraduate in the University of Nottingham. The center I am work in is located in a peaceful area in Chiang Rai, Thailand. The center is very colorful outside and the people here are pretty nice inside. The work I do here are regular and not hard, and you can do what you want for the center and the children here. When people ask me about the reason I do volunteering, the answer is pretty easy. I just want to do something for the society and try best to value myself. And I also believe that everyone can do little things to make a better world

Volunteer

Rating: 4

My name is Sue, a year one student from University of Nottingham, Ningbo, China. This is my first time to go to Indonesia and be a volunteer in IHF Medan Center. Medan Center is the biggest center of IHF in Indonesia, with more than two hundred students. IHF Center provides free education of English, Math and Computer. I teach English in our Center and have a good relationship with our director, local teachers and students. I choose to become an IHF volunteer because I want to help people. Of course I'm trying to help them now, and I also have the chance to practice my English, to make more friends and to learn to be independent.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I have now been in Kenya, Nakuru for almost 3 months, it has so far been the best experience of my life. I can’t imagine myself going back to the UK, and doing a job that is not closely related to what I am doing at the moment. I am a youth worker and I would like to be a social worker, I have experience with NGO work, however, it is not extensive. I was very surprised at how much trust and responsibility I was given with IHF, but I was also given constant training and help by more experienced directors and staff at the centre. We work long hours and some days are exhausting, but being surrounded by the children make everything ok, they uplift me and it helps to think that though I am stressed I know I am making even but a small difference in their lives and that thought always helps me and pushes me on to work even harder. The work is so versatile that I do many things, for example I am in charge of the legal side, I also work on the fundraising side but also do report writing and volunteer training.

EvieBool

Volunteer

Rating: 5

My name is Evie, and I’m currently a second year university student from London. I first heard about the International Humanity Foundation’s work through my sister, who has volunteered as a Co-Director in both the Medan and Chiang Rai centres. I quickly found myself fascinated and impressed by the charity’s efforts, so it seemed absurd to not seize this amazing opportunity and apply for a Work-Study volunteer placement. I soon joined my sister in Chiang Rai, and it was honestly one of the best decisions I have ever made, not only a chance to volunteer with thirteen incredible children for a great cause, but also to discover a country as beautiful as Thailand for myself.

IHF Thailand is a home for children from the Northern Thailand hill tribes, who have have found themselves in vulnerable situations. It creates a family, support network and provides education to empower the children, alleviating them from marginalisation and poverty. My time at the centre is spent either online - completing work to assist the charity’s efforts, or locally - be this cooking dinner, helping the children with their homework, or mostly, just spending memorable, quality time with the children.

Working in Chiang Rai has motivated me to travel in the future. The knowledge and experience I have gained here is invaluable, learning about the IHF through its various mechanisms– fundraising, recruitment and the importance of media for example - I’ve gained an incredible introduction to the NGO sector, something I was relatively unaware of before.

The time I’ve spent with the children has proved invaluable, and inspired me to cherish every second of this opportunity.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

My name is Yasien, and I am an undergraduate student at Austin College in Texas, USA. I am pursuing a career as a physician, and hope to someday work on international health issues. This summer I am volunteering with the International Humanity Foundation in the Aceh center located in Banda Aceh, Indonesia. This center is an education facility for children, we hold many classes daily that are free and open to any children in the area.

At the center I am in charge of teaching English, Math, and the newly added Arabic class. Each class is held for one hour two times a week from Monday to Saturday between 2 and 6pm. We also teach English and Math in classes in a village outside of Banda Aceh called Blang Krueng. All of our students come to us in the hope that they can be better equipped for their future academic challenges. At IHF Aceh we do our best to ensure that every student is engaged and we work alongside them to master topics they have difficulties with.

I love to make use of things I have learned to benefit others, especially children. With IHF’s focus on passing it on, I am able to do what I love and have some unique experiences I never would have expected to have. I am learning more everyday, and cannot wait to see what there is for me to learn tomorrow!

Volunteer

Rating: 5

With the beginning of my senior year of undergraduate studies approaching, I had decided to do something really valuable with my summer. I have studied abroad in numerous countries, and have a record bursting with service and volunteering. Thus, I began my quest to find a volunteering opportunity abroad the way any other sane-minded individual would; a google search. It wasn’t long before a free volunteering search engine had suggested that I apply to the International Humanity Foundation.
My involvement in the IHF happened entirely by chance. I found the foundation in a wide-sweeping search, researched the Foundation and immediately fell in-love with its cause and the varying opportunities they offered volunteers. I applied, completely willing to be placed in any of the IHF’s centers across Indonesia, Thailand and Kenya, and finally was offered a position at the center in Chiang Rai, Thailand.
My work as a volunteer in center has truly been life changing. The Chiang Rai center is unique to any of the IHF’s other centers in that it is a home for 13 children, all of whom are from Hilltribe villages. I came to Thailand expecting to teach English and interact with children who have had difficult childhoods, but what I have experience here has been so much more.
Living in center, sharing meals and playing cricket and surfing facebook with the kids has made me a family member, like an older sister, rather than a worker. I feel as if establishing real relationships and friendships with the children has made more of an impact on someone’s life than any other community service experience I have done.
Working with IHF in the community has contributed hugely to my professional and educational development. Witnessing the empowerment that comes from education, the realities of poverty, the multifaceted contributors to social marginalization, as well as understanding all factors of international developmental issues (i.e. lack of social systems, lack of infrastructure, social and economic inequality ect.) have given true insight and hands on experience into the issues pertaining to my studies of international relations.
Despite how long and tiring some days may be in-center, when I stop and consider all that I have accomplished I realize that my experience with IHF has been valuable beyond words. It has enforced my chosen educational track, and inspired me to pursue a more specific and focused trajectory in my graduate studies. I have grown as an individual and made incredible connections with the children and staff that I have been so honored to work with. I came to work for IHF expecting to do good in a community of under privileged children, and while I was none-the-less successful, it had never occurred that I would come out the experience being the one who changed the most.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

My name is Adam Gloser. At 17 I decided to take a gap year in Prague, where I worked in 7 different jobs from a street salesman for a charitable company to a tourist guide. It was my goal for the entire gap year to get into a university and to travel to a foreign country with Thailand being my first choice. I got into the university of Herriot-Watt for Urban Planning and Property Development, and earned enough money from tour guiding and being a waiter to travel to Thailand, Laos and Cambodia. But I thought it would be a shame to travel to these foreign countries with so much time to spare without using the time productively and volunteering at a charitable foundation. My friend and travel companion found the IHF centre in Chiang Rai, Thailand, and we both signed up.
Expecting a very poor centre with a few very young children, we were both very pleasantly surprised when we arrived at the centre to discover that all the basic amenities were present. A working kitchen, a water supply, gas, basic food, mosquito nets and electricity all worked relatively well. The main point of the centre is to provide a caring and nurturing home for children with poor backgrounds. The IHF provides the children with free education (the education system in Thailand is not free, the IHF relies on donations and sponsorship programs), food and water, a caring director, the provisions needed for mental development (books, pens, access to the internet, musical instruments etc.) but most importantly of all; a safe home.
As a Work-Study Volunteer our main task is to attend to the children. This means creating a fun programme for the afternoon, after the children come back from school. We arrived at the end of the school's long holiday. Therefore the children, who did not go to school, had almost too much spare time. We organised trips to the local riverfront called “the beach”, or to the local waterfalls, to the night markets, or spending the day cleaning the “pool”, tending to a possible herb garden. Plainly we tried to occupy them before boredom got hold of the children. Another task we had was providing entertaining but educational English classes. These were carried out after school 3 times a week through songs, flash-cards, games, reading and general conversations. However, some days the children were simply too exhausted from waking up at 6 in the morning and spending the day at school, that by the time they came home (at 4PM) their concentration began to drift away from studies, but their determination and eagerness to learn created some very memorable lessons.
I guess what I had learned from my experience at the IHF is what wonderful people exist in this world. I know this sounds cheesy, but the circumstances from which the children came from would prevent any other child from functioning in the ‘normal’ world. But the children at the IHF centre have smiling faces, are kind and are extremely eager to learn. Most of the things we did with them, they could do better. The best example is cooking; we thought we would have to cook for the children, but to our surprise the children would usually cook for us and make the food better than we ever could! I learnt a great deal of humility, and came to the realisation that I am in fact spoilt. The children here have next to nothing but no problem is unsolvable. It has been a great moral boost, a feeling of actually doing something notable on this planet is a feeling I hope will not leave me in the near future. Most of all, the experience has created a new understanding of poverty, development and human generosity.

1

Volunteer

Rating: 5


I’m 24 years old, from England and a professional ESL teacher. I am interested in volunteering and NGO work because I like to ‘give something back’ and I would like to work for NGOs full time in the future.

Firstly, a bit of information about where I volunteered: the IHF center in Aceh is primarily an Educational center, although they are currently looking for orphans to live in-center. It holds free English, Maths and Computer lessons six days a week for students from the first year of Junior school to college level. It has many local volunteers who teach and help with the daily running of the center and two full-time local volunteers; the director, Philippe, and the co-director, Joko.

While I was at the center I taught English classes to all ages five days a week as well as helping with things such as recruitment campaigns in local underpriveliged areas and the running of events such as workshops. Teaching these kids was great fun because they really want to learn, they have a motivation which is really different to the children I have taught before and they are always up for a laugh. The recruitment campaigns were eye-opening for me because we generally visited slum areas of the city and it made me realise all the stuff that I take for granted back home.

I was also involved in a project where we visit a school in an area far away from the center twice a week to teach English and maths. These classes were crazy because sometimes there were over 25 kids in one class but awesome because they spent the whole time laughing and smiling. I made them run around a lot which might have added to the craziness but they were still pretty well-behaved when I asked them to be quiet or when I was trying to teach them something new. These were my favourite classes here because there is so much energy bouncing around and I’d always finish the two hours sweaty and exhausted but with a big grin on my face!

As the center is small it is a great place for your own ideas and input. Whilst I was there I spearheaded a project where I created a yearly curriculum for all the English classes for the center to use. I also organised putting on a charity fundraising concert which was stressful but really easy in a lot of ways. I had the idea for it on a Monday evening and by the Saturday night the concert had started! People here are really helpful and businesses and the media are easy to reach so it is comparatively simple for your ideas to come to life when you look at all the red tape you would have to go through in many other countries.

I wanted to volunteer with IHF because they offered a varied volunteering experience and the chance to learn about NGOs by doing international tasks daily online. I was involved in the fundraising, volunteer recruitment, media and university relations teams. I have learned a lot about these different aspects of the running of NGOs and it has been a great experience. It was cool to see the results of my work, for example in the fundraising team I was given a lot of freedom and was able to create an email template with photos etc for volunteers to use when contacting their friends and family about IHF.

I chose the Aceh center particularly because I wanted to experience a vastly different culture to my own. It has been fascinating learning about the 2004 tsunami as there is a museum and there are many monuments in the city. I was initially a little nervous about going to volunteer in a predominintely Muslim community as I thought that I might do something wrong or offend someone. However, it has been very enlightening, the Acehnese people that I have met have been extremely friendly and have been keen to explain their religion and culture to me. I have made lots of friends and I love the taste of Acehnese coffee! The scenery here is gorgeous as well, they have loads of white sand beaches and towering tree-covered mountains. On days off local volunteers usually come to the center on their motorbikes and drive us round the city or to the beach.

In general I have had a great time at the Aceh center and I can’t believe that it’s almost time for me to go! I have learned a lot about the running of NGOs and the processes involved in keeping a education center like this open. It requires a lot of hard work and long hours but is also very rewarding. Through my online international work I have gained experience in other areas apart from teaching. I have also learned about the pressures of organising an event and how to use them as a fundraising tool. If you come here I reckon you will have an awesome time and come away with a new set of friends and experiences just like me!


Volunteer

Rating: 5

This is the third week we came here and it is a good chance to review about what we have done and learned here. As one member of volunteering team, our work is mostly about the advertisements postings on websites. During the time I did the work, I know more about our volunteers and directors of IHF. Every time I was posting, the only wish was that more people can see it so that we can help center get more good volunteers and directors. I believe, there will continually more people come here because helping others is really a happy thing. Although our time here is almost running out of and work is almost finished, I will remember what I learn from here. Volunteering team, I am grateful that can get a chance here to contribute my helping!

Volunteer

Rating: 4

This is my 9th week at this center. The weather was just amazing, the rain and the sun were taking turn off and on a few times in a day. The field beside our center was flooding, a lot of dragonflies with different colors and tiny bugs flying around. Every morning the day start with very fresh air and the surrounding just looked so green and nice. It was really joyful!

On Wednesday’s computer class, Emelie and I were teaching the children regarding some theory knowledge and how to handle and keep the computers well. The children were sitting on the floor, according to them it was the Pagarwesi Day and they were not allowed to sit on the chairs. So they were a bit exiting and distraction because of sitting on the floor and quite close to each other.

We are a bit busy this week because of preparing the new curriculum and test papers. When I told the children regarding the test and the prize award day, they seems like quite expecting for that. Hopefully we could have something special and exciting on that day.






Previous Stories

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I have been volunteering at the IHF Bali Center for one month. Everything is just so interesting to me: the beautiful garden with all kind of plants and flowers, fishes in the ponds, the cows, chickens, bugs etc..
The center is located by the seaside and there are two small villages nearby. Although one is a Muslim village and the other one is a Hindu village, all the residents seem to live in harmony. Most of our children come from these two villages. Every time we pass the village or buy something from the stores there, everybody will just try to greet us and speak to us. I found that they really have a simple and yet contented life.
The children here are mostly very enthusiastic and active. I have been teaching some classes and I was always encouraged by the children’s laughter. I am trying my best to teach them English and Computer, they always turned up so eager to learn and improve themselves.
When I decided to join IHF as a volunteer, I just hoped that I could get some good experience while teaching the children and mixing with them. Other than that, I have been assigned for some international task work to do as well and these were another good experience to me. So far, I really have a fulfilling and enjoyable life here.

Volunteer

Rating: 4

I have been a volunteer at the IHF center in Chiang Rai for three weeks now and I have enjoyed every minute of it. Most of the kids here are teenagers, so it was a bit of a struggle at the beginning to get their attention, but the more I get to know them, the more I realize how amazing they are. The children live at the center and we spend most of the day with them, we work, play and cook together, so you get to know them really well. IHF is doing some amazing work in helping these children and it is a privilege to work for them.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I came to the IHF centre in Thailand in July as a voluntourist for two weeks and loved it so much that I'm already back again, this time as a work/study volunteer for one month. Initially what attracted me to IHF is that it is transparent, unaffiliated with any religion, respects the Thai culture and is affordable. Having worked within the organisation I now respect it on a whole new level. The Thai centre does a lot with a little, encourages a 'family' environment, and the directors work tirelessly.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I feel very fortunate to be part of IHF; an organization that cares for education and in spite of all the challenges it faces, it keeps pushing towards the goal of providing education for the most vulnerable children. This organization has inspired me to keep contributing to causes that focus on education.

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 5

Volunteering with IHF Bali has been great because it allows me to interact with a genuine part of the island. Life here is traditional, and the needs of the surroundings are in coherence with local customs. Volunteering with IHF also allows me to work with an NPO and to be apart of every part of the organization, it's an allrounded learning experience - albeit intense. Between teaching and tending to regular maintenance I get a chance to play with the children that visit our center, at those moments makes all the hard work worth it.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I volunteered with IHF in the Jakarta center, and it was a great experience. Teaching the kids was challenging, but a lot of fun, and I learnt so much about how important education is, and how to get it to the kids who need it the most. I still miss the friends I made, and I would definitely go back and do it all again!

Volunteer

Rating: 5

IHF is distinct from other NGO’s in this field as we practice the ‘Pass it on’ ethos in marginalized regions. I volunteered for the Thailand center in Chang Rai which houses 12 young people ranging from 8 to 17. I am currently undertaking the position so far I have learned so much, not only about looking after the children and teaching but of their culture of the culture in the hill-tribes of Northern Thailand, in particular the Luhu. It has been a rewarding challenge so far. I have also gained so much knowledge about the ins and outs of running and NGO, the issues that go on day in day out. Its been a great experience in not having comforts of home. I have gained so much so far from this valuable opportunity. Please take the time to familiarize yourself further with the organization - www.ihfonline.org. And the blog http://ihfblog.wordpress.com/home/.

If you have any questions at this time, feel free to e-mail one of the helpful volunteers - volunteering@ihfonline.org . If you’re ready to apply visit: http://www.ihfonline.org/volunteering.