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2010 Top-Rated Nonprofit

Greenhill Humane Society

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Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Animal Protection & Welfare, Animals

Mission: Greenhill Humane Society, SPCA will provide safe shelter for animals in transition, serve as advocates for animals and their people, work to end animal overpopulation and educate the public about compassion and responsibility towards all animals.

Results: From June 09 - July 10, Greenhill Humane Society achieved an 86.3% save rate for cats and an even higher rate for dogs, at 99.6%.  Greenhill found homes for 746 dogs and 956 cats during this same period.  In addition to receiving animals from individuals, Greenhill receives animals from other shelters in their Interagency Transfer Program giving them a second chance at finding a loving home when time and resources have run out at their shelter. Spay/Neuter Services - During the year ended June 30, 2010, Greenhill performed 3,402 surgeries in their regular clinic and 586 surgeries through the trap-neuter-release program. Volunteer & Foster Programs - Greenhill Humane Society has approximately 225 active volunteers and 100 active foster families.  Volunteers and foster families help in the daily care, training, socializing, and rehabilitation of animals brought to the shelter.  The volunteer and foster program works with schools, community service programs, and the general public to help promote humane education through hands-on animal welfare experience.

Target demographics: We shelter homeless companion animals and work to prevent homeless pet over-population through free and low-cost targeted spay/neuter.

Direct beneficiaries per year: Nearly 2,000 animals per year.

Geographic areas served: Oregon

Programs: Sheltering and adoptions - during the year ended june 30, 2015, greenhill humane society spca, operated two animal shelters in eugene, oregon and cared for 3,010 animals in its sheltering, return to owner, adoption and transfer program. During the year ended june 30, 2015, the organization cared for 1,362 cats, 1,560 dogs and 88 other animals. The organization continues to maintain one of the highest live release rates in the country. The organization saved 97% of the dogs that came to the shelters, 88% of the cats, and 92% of the other animals. Overall, the organization's live release rate for the year ended june 30, 2015 is 92%. Continued - see schedule o continued from statement of program services accomplishments the organization runs the second chance program which receives animals from other shelters and animal welfare agencies in oregon and california, giving them a second chance at finding a loving home when the time and resources have run out at their shelter. During the year ended june 30, 2015, 377 animals were cared for through this program. Greenhill humane society, spca has approximately 348 active volunteers and 110 active foster families per month. During the year ended june 30, 2015, approximately 1,100 volunteers contributed 38,377 hours. Volunteers and foster families help in the daily care, training, socializing and rehabilitation of animals brought to the shelter. The volunteer and foster program works with schools, community service programs and the general public to help promote humane education through hands-on animal welfare experience.

spay/neuter services - the organization provides spay/neuter services, a medical clinic, behavior training, and a trap/neuter/return program. All of the animals at the organization are provided with medical care and an environment that includes behavior training and exercise programs. During the year ended june 30, 2015, the organization performed 2,350 spay/neuter surgeries and 395 other essential surgeries in their medical clinic. Trap/neuter/return program (tnr) provides free spay/neuter surgeries for free-roaming cats within lane county. During the year ended june 30, 2015, the organization performed 961 free spay/neuter surgeries through this program.

humane education and community outreach - educating the community and promoting the animals and programs of greenhill humane society, spca is crucial to helping achieve the vision of finding loving homes for all animals. The organization reaches out to schools and other groups to educate about the importance of responsible pet ownership and the humane treatment of animals. The organization participates in off-site adoption and awareness events, and photos and descriptions of animals available for adoption are available on the organization's website and major on-line "petworking" sites. The organization's website receives an average of 1,455 visits per day. In the year ended june 30, 2015, the organization's outreach and education program reached 13,600 children and adults.

Community Stories

52 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

1

Board Member

Rating: 5

Greenhill Humane is an organization that has quietly lead a change in our community to improve the welfare of our companion and outdoor animals. It is all about the animals, whether in Greenhill's care or elsewhere, for the staff at GHS. Keep up the good work!

1

Board Member

Rating: 5

Greenhill is a fantastic organization, which is why I adopted my dog, Simon, from the shelter nearly 4 years ago. Since that time, I've joined the board and volunteer LOTS of my time to this wonderful organization. They are dedicated to increasing spay/neuter rates in the area, helping to reduce animal overpopulation in the area. They have hired a full-time staff vet, who serves as an invaluable resource to Greenhill shelter animals as well as the animal welfare community in general. They have incredibly high "live release rates," meaning nearly all of the animals who come through the shelter find homes. They are organized and always striving to improve. I am proud to serve on the board of this fantastic organization.

1

Board Member

Rating: 5

As a board member and volunteer with Greenhill for the last several years, I have seen first hand the committment Greenhill's staff and its voluteers have to serving this community and its animals. Greenhill is constantly striving to improve itself and have a greater positive impact on animal welfare in the community.

1

Board Member

Rating: 5

As a Board Member, I see the hard work that goes on behind the scenes to make the most of the budget and continue to improve the organization, and I have been continually impressed with the passion for animal welfare shown by everyone involved. The staff and volunteers at Greenhill are incredibly dedicated to making the lives of the animals in their care as pleasant as possible before they find their forever homes. Greenhill's administration is committed to expanding and improving its services by improving medical care and updating their facilities when their budget allows to better serve the animals. Greenhill's management works very hard to try to coordinate services with other animal care organizations in our region to care for the animal population as efficiently and effectively as possible. They also frequently take animals in from "high kill" shelters - even as far away as Los Angeles, to save the animals from being euthanized. Greenhill is generally regarded as a fantastic asset to Lane County. I am proud to represent Greenhill in our community and I love all the positive feedback I hear when I mention the shelter. Unfortunately, there are some people with serious misconceptions about Greenhill, who are committed to trying to damage its reputation. This negativity helps no one - least of all the animals we are trying to save. I encourage anyone interested in Greenhill to visit the shelter and see its great work firsthand!

1

Volunteer

Rating: 5

Greenhill is great! I love helping the animals, and I love all of the people I meet at greenhill. Sometimes the job of cleaning isn't the most fun, but it's a great cause!

1

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I volunteer at Greenhill. It's a great place with great people and wonderful animals. I moved here recently and started to volunteer with Greenhill about a year ago. They really do a lot for the animals in their care. Everyone I've met there cares so much, and the volunteers are really involved in helping. I feel so appreciated, and that I am making a difference.

6

General Member of the Public

Rating: 1

Greenhill receives the majority of the support given to animal non-profits in Lane County. However, as newer, smaller organizations are formed, GHS demonstrates their intent to maintain this dominance by co-opting the upstart, more progressive 501 (c)(3)'s. For instance, the Shelter Animal Resource Alliance (S.A.R.A.) was formed to rescue doomed dogs from the county animal control in 2001. After observing the success of this program for a few years, Greenhill saw it as a way to improve their own statistics and convinced LCAS to give the program to them. For 30 years Greenhill was uninterested in spaying and neutering--they had to be persuaded by local advocates to even do their own animals before adoption. Now, after noticing that there seems to be no backlash from the local vets concerning the Willamette Animal Guild's spay clinic, they have decided to open their own in-house clinic to the public. Ironically, they recently received a sizable grant to TNR feral cats although they have an active feral kill program. As the No-Kill movement progresses in Lane County, the front desk volunteers tell callers that Greenhill is a no-kill facility. It is NOT. Policy is dictated not by the charming and diverting new director, but by the ladies in the back with the blue needles. Greenhill's latest tactic is to persuade the local PetSmart store to let them take over the cat adoption room there, displacing a program that has been run by West Coast Dog and Cat Rescue for at least 3 years, despite the fact that the room was conveniently empty and available way before WCDC took it on. So often it's heard, "Why can't we all get along for the sake of the animals?" Greenhill is not there for the sake of the animals. Greenhill is there for the sake of Greenhill. Why cooperate when they can co-opt? Then there's no need to share the glory OR the funding.

1

General Member of the Public

Rating: 5

I came to Greenhill with a friend of mine to help her adopt a cat. I had never been to the shelter before and really didn't know what to expect. I was really impressed. The cats have the most wonderful space with toys and things to climb on. There were a number of people there to help us make a choice. They knew all of the cats and their personalities, and everyone was so friendly and took the time to talk to us.

1

Client Served

Rating: 5

I just adopted a dog from Greenhill. It was a great experience, thank you! The staff spent a lot of time with me and answered all of my questions. It seemed like the dogs were all very well taken care of, and the staff knew all about each one.

1

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I have been a volunteer at Greenhill for the past two years, and find it a really incredible organization. I read the previous posts and really don't understand what those people are talking about - perhaps they should visit the organization again as it sounds as though it has been years since their negative experience. What I am really impressed about is how much they care about the animals and the volunteers. The staff are friendly and really pay attention to the animals' needs. As a volunteer, I really feel that I am part of the team making life better for homeless animals and helping to find them homes. It is extremely rewarding. If I had one thing to change, I hope that someday they can build a new dog kennel. The cats have a beautiful large open space in which they live, not in small cages like other shelters, but the dogs still have an old concrete brick kennel. Perhaps someday they will be able to raise enough money to build a new kennel.

4

Volunteer

Rating: 1

As a former volunteer at Greenhill, I would urge donors to look elsewhere when giving away money. For too long, Greenhill (or Greenkill, as they are known is some of the local animal rescue circles) has skated on their so-called "good reputation". Their reputation, in fact, was why I had chosen the shelter at which to volunteer in the first place. What I found was that reputation was undeserved. During the several months that I volunteered there, I was appalled at much of what I saw: there were dogs who, week after week, continued to lose weight due to the stress of being in the kennel. Of course, I understand that kennel stress is a fact of life at a shelter, but the math is simple: more calories in will balance the higher calorie burn of a stressed dog. It didn't seem that anyone there was doing the math, though. Each week that I would show up to walk dogs, the dogs (and one in particular) were skinnier and skinnier. I do not exaggerate when I say that the one was completely emaciated, to the point that each and every rib and vertebra could be counted, and his face was completely sunken in. It got to the point where some of the volunteer dog walkers were sneaking extra food to these dogs in an effort to prevent them from starving to death. Thankfully, both of those dogs were finally adopted before they perished. I also often would come in to find a favorite dog euthanized for suspect reasons and can even recall four month old puppies being euthanized. The reason? Food aggression. Guarding food is a natural survival tendency in a dog that young and is not generally difficult to correct. All too often, it seemed (in my estimation)the first reaction to a dog with problems was to euthanize. During my stint at GH, volunteers who expressed concern over the number of euthanasias and the reasons for the decision were placated, intimidated, or told outright that their services were no longer needed. I was even threatened once by Katie Dyer when I expressed my own concerns to, essentially, keep my mouth shut if I know what's good for me. Eventually, though I felt like I was abandoning the animals, I had to cease volunteering there in an effort to preserve my own sanity and self-respect. Since then, I have been working with another local organization who makes every effort to rehabilitate dogs who have nowhere else to go, and we have been very successful and operate on a budget of about 1% of what Greenhill takes in. Lastly, there is absolutely no reason at all why a very choosy and relatively well-funded closed admission shelter such as Greenhill should not be a no-kill organization. With the resources they have and the ability to pick and choose amongst the most adoptable of animals, it's stunning that they have any euthanasias at all.