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Intermuseum Conservation Association

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Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Arts & Culture, Arts, Culture & Humanities, Arts Services, Historical Organizations, Visual Arts

Mission: Ica works with member institutions, corporate and individual collectors to conserve and preserve their objects, artifacts, and documents. Ica also provides workshops, lectures, and symposia to train collections care professionals and the general public on issues surrounding art and artifact preservation.

Programs: Ica is the nations' oldest fine art conservation center offering conservation and restoration services for paintings, murals, art objects, furniture, statuary, monuments, pottery, paper products, manuscripts, books, photographs, posters, flags, uniforms, dresses, and metal or clay ceramics. The highly trained staff provides service to churches, zoos, libraries, hospitals, foundations, government agencies, corporations, universities, museums and collectors.

the very active education and outreach department offers a number of public programs. Ica has collaborated on educational initiatives with over thirty cultural and academic institutions across the state of ohio. This allows ica to reach more demographically and geographically diverse audience, while maximizing the impact of its limited program dollars. Ica has made contact with numerous individuals via outreach efforts, many of whom had no prior knowledge of ica.

Community Stories

11 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 5

Incredibly talented and dedicated pros. Thorough understanding of their craft: what they don’t know they research until they do. Very impressive organization.

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 5

As a career museum registrar, I have depended on Intermuseum Conservation Association for the best counsel in collection care for decades. Their conservators are generous with their time and expertise, offering free advice on the phone and in person. I am not aware of any for-profit conservators who provide this service. Many for-profit conservators charge a fee for a consultation, whether or not conservation treatment is ultimately recommended, which can be cost-prohibitive for a small museum or historical society. Further, Intermuseum Conservation Association has presented many educational programs over the years, at low or no cost. Their seminars on collection storage, wet salvage, care of religious artifacts and identification and housing of works on paper have been invaluable.

1

General Member of the Public

Rating: 5

ICA is a pillar to the arts community providing numerous preservation/conservation services and educational programming for institutions and the public. The staff is always welcoming, knowledgeable, and happy to help in whatever capacity they can. Consultations are free and easy to schedule.

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 5

It is clear when you first walk through the door that the ICA has a talented and professional staff. The ICA has trained conservators in textiles, paintings, paper and objects. The staff will give a free 30 minute consultation to their clients and educational outreach in conservation, preservation and disaster response to the Cleveland and Ohio areas. The treatment that comes out of the ICA is museum quality art conservation treatment. Cleveland is lucky to have the ICA as a resource.

2

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 5

ICA-Art Conservation is a wonderful organization. They are dedicated to the preservation of artistic and cultural heritage and are a critical resource for Ohio and the surrounding region. The staff is passionate, friendly, knowledgeable, and ready to help with whatever your conservation or preservation needs may be.

2

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 5

The ICA is a wonderful organization staffed by dedicated professionals who work with the general public as well as collecting institutions large and small. It is committed to preserving the cultural heritage of Ohio and surrounding states and educating the community about the importance of historic preservation. Because of its non-profit, educational mandate, over the course of the year it provides numerous free consultations over the phone, in person, and onsite as well as internship opportunities and numerous public programs at no charge. I am very proud of the work my colleagues and I have done at the ICA over the past 18 years.

2

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 5

Arts and culture collections in the Midwest, though demographically distant from the important East and West Coasts, have embedded narratives that are nationally and/or internationally far-reaching and relevant, as well as intellectually, emotionally, or economically noteworthy for cities, towns, or regions.

ICA has significant experience working with these—collections for which our notions of preservation must exceed the acts of simply stabilizing, cleaning, and enabling safe and climate-controlled display conditions. These collections by their nature require audiences to be able to make the connections among objects and the larger world of ideas in which they exist.

ICA has worked extensively with libraries, archives, museums, historical societies, repositories, galleries, performing arts organizations, governmental and public agencies at all levels, academic institutions, and other collection stewards in our region since our founding in 1952 to ensure that collections are preserved for this purpose.

Three collections, described below, indicate some of the depth and breadth of this work with humanities collections.

ICA is working at the Cranbrook Educational Community, to assess the contents of all the historic house museums on the campus. Cranbrook, located near Detroit in Bloomfield Hills, MI, holds a central position in the scholarship and study of the history of modern art, architecture, design, and material culture. Cranbrook’s campus is on the National Register of Historic Places and among those who lived, worked, and taught at Cranbrook are ceramicist Toshiko Takaezu, fabric artist Mary Walker Phillips, animator Susan Pitts, and Columbian artist Olga de Amaral. Architects Eliel and Eero Saarinen, Rafael Moneo, and Albert Kahn all had hands in shaping the learning and physical environment. (https://www/nps.gov/nr/travel/detroit/d1.htm).

ICA conservators have worked closely with the Missouri Capital Arts Commission to survey and conserve the murals of the Capital Building in Jefferson City, MO. Among the many stories told in the building is the narrative of Missouri’s relationship with the mighty Mississippi River, the waterway that allowed the state to function as the nexus of activities for people and goods moving east and west across the country in the 19th century. (https://www/youtube.com/watch?v=uYm6axT79Hc).

In ICA’s home state of Ohio, we have a long history with the Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) and the private foundation that preserves the experimental farm and home of Pulitzer Prize-winning author Louis Bromfield (http://www.malabarfarm.org). Bromfield’s estate includes paintings by Grandma Moses (he wrote the introduction to the first catalog of her works), a replica of a late 1930s suite at the St. Regis Hotel in New York City (built for his business manager who didn’t like to leave New York City, complete with shutters to block out “nature”); and first edition books given to the author by Gertrude Stein, Edith Wharton, Edna Ferber, Margaret Wilson, and many others.

ICA works consistently to transform its relationships with the over 3,000 organizations it has worked with from one of providing unique and hard to find conservation services, to one of partnership--partnerships based on the use of current preventive care and best practice information combined with organization-specific individual consultation to help determine the priorities. In this way organizations can plan for and allocate their scarce resources to maximize the best care and outcomes for their collections.

2 SP_Art_Historian

General Member of the Public

Rating: 5

ICA-Art Conservation is committed to helping the community consulting on collections care. All you have to do is set up an appointment and receive a FREE consultation on caring for your great-grandmother's needlepoint. They give free printouts, resources, and presentations on how to care for your things at home. The staff is so friendly, helpful, and knowledgeable in all things conservation, preservation, and restoration.

2

General Member of the Public

Rating: 5

Intermuseum Conservation Association (ICA) is such an amazing organization. The conservators are so passionate about their art and have a love for sharing it with all who will listen. ICA is also doing a great job at reaching out to the community with their education and outreach program. If you haven't had a tour, you should put this on your list of places visit (of course call first), then grab a bit to eat at one the many cool places in Hinge town.

2

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 5

The ICA is an amazing organization that aims to educate and engage the community regarding art conservation and its role in preserving our cultural and artistic heritage for all of us.

Review from Guidestar

1

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 3

The Intermuseum Conservation Association appears to receive substantial revenue from fee-based services based on my review of its 990 reports, offering the very same art conservation services as so many similar for-profit enterprises today and offers the kinds of pro-bono services to the public, on-going professional research, and educational opportunities (internships) as some for-profit conservation service providers whose business success can support these public service activities. Therefore, it may be expected that, like any successful business providing art conservation services, many of these public benefit pro-bono services can be provided by either non-profit and for-profit entities alike entirely from fee-based service revenue. Art conservation services outside of in-house museum departments today are mostly provided by for-profit commercial enterprises, many of which self-fund the expected professional contributions to public outreach, basic professional advancement research and aid to those who can not fully pay. Many decades ago, conservation centers such as the Intermuseum Conservation Laboratory operated by the Intermuseum Conservation Association were pioneers in the basics of conservation research and the promotion of conservation awareness and were in need of granted funding to support these activities of a fledgling profession. Nowadays, the growth of for-profit and similar providers of art conservation services have grown immensely and the public and museum communities are now well educated on preservation. This makes the old non-profit model of an art conservation center appear like a dinosaur today, yet they keep begging for financial support that a number of art conservation businesses have proven is unnecessary. On this basis, The Intermuseum Conservation Association seems less a reasonable candidate for General Operating Support in these times. However, the Intermuseum Conservation Association offers valuable programs that can not normally be funded from the revenue of for-profit art conservation services providers and therefore the Intermuseum Conservation Association is deserving of consideration of program-based funding.

Review from Guidestar