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2013 Top-Rated Nonprofit

Forest History Society

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Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Environment, Forest Conservation

Mission: To preserve and help people use the documents of forest history. The Forest History Society identifies, collects, interprets, and disseminates historical information on the relationship of humans and forests, contributing to informed natural resource decision-making.

Results: Currently FHS is working on our Repeat Photography Portal, a Carl Schenck documentary and will soon be starting a capital campaign to raise money for a new building as we are quickly outgrowing our current space as our collections expand.

Programs: Journal- to publish the journal environmental history, the journal of record in forest and conservation history.

library- to develop and maintain the foremost collection in the world of forest and conservation history books, journals, and other materials; to develop bibliographies, archival guides, encyclopedias, and other source material for researchers; and to conduct oral histories of leaders and workers in forest industry and conservation.

research and publications- conduct research and promote writing and publications that synthesize the substantial historical literature in forest and conservation history. The society's impressive list of publications includes the forest history today magazine, the issues series booklets, dozens of book-length publications and films.

Community Stories

12 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

Volunteer

Rating: 5

As a volunteer for two years, I consider the FHS a unique and invaluable archive and research center for all things related to forests, the wood industry, and environmental history. If they don't have what you are looking for, their archivists know where you can find it. Any level of information request, from grade school research projects to published authors, is given professional consideration, free of charge. The staff is passionate and knowledgable as well as a surprisingly friendly group that seem to truly enjoy their work. Their research and publications expand our understanding of forest and envrionmental history and how it relates to our world today.

Board Member

Rating: 5

"A tour de force examination of Southern forestry. This volume examines the multifaceted influences that have made the southern forest and southern forestry what it is today. No stone is left unturned, from silviculture to wildfire, from industrial technology to biotechnology. Not only does the book provide an interesting coverage of important personalities involved, but it also provides a useful reference."

2

Volunteer

Rating: 5

The Forest History Society provides invaluable resources for research into environmental history, conservation, forestry, ecology and more. The archives house thousands of feet of primary documents, with materials originating from around the world. FHS publishes original research and work from outstanding historians and scholars. They host dozens of researchers every year and organize educational outreach opportunities with Duke University and other organizations in the area. Did I mention they have an award winning, thoughtful, innovative and some times hilarious blog? Check it out: http://fhsarchives.wordpress.com/

In my (far too short) time volunteering with FHS what really stood out for me was how great the people there are. I had never worked with such a friendly, understanding, and helpful group before and that kind of environment really translates to the visiting researchers and scholars as well. My time spent at FHS was crucial to my development as a librarian and archivist, and provided a venue for tackling a variety of research, clerical, technical, and archival undertakings. The kinds of things you don't learn in class. What a great place to work, learn, and collaborate!

1

Board Member

Rating: 5

“Having ready access to a comprehensive collection of forestry’s history that is supported by a tremendously responsive staff is invaluable. From high school essays through higher level research, there is something in the FHS library for everyone. The organization is the finest example of a non-profit designed to aid industry, provide service and preserve history.”

1

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 5

The Forest History Society was critical for completing my dissertation research and has been extremely helpful on subsequent projects. The staff is always quick to answer questions when I email them. And it's always a pleasure to see their representatives at professional meetings.

1

Board Member

Rating: 5

The Forest History Society has helped dozens of researchers and wriers find information and new perspectives on the history of forestry in the United States and Canada. With thousands of photographs, many digitized, and a wealth of research-ready background material, the FHS fills a unique niche for those interested in and/or wanting to write about the many facets of forest history. The research staff at FHS goes out of its way to provide individual assistance to clients. Susan Moore

Client Served

Rating: 5

The Forest History Society have helped advance my research on many levels. The staff answered my questions and suggested other sources for research. The oral histories I have read from their archives have been highly edifiying on the subject of Forest History. The people involved in forestry management are truly interesting , well rounded personalities. I recommend this Forest History Society to anyone, on any level of research.

Board Member

Rating: 5

FHS is the most comprehensive archive and library of forest and conservation history in North America. This rare resource is vital to researchers and historians writing the history of North American forestry and conservation. And, the photos, blog and other information available to all on the excellent FHS website and other portals is well-presented and exciting. FHS publications, most especially the Issues Series, are right on target and designed for the general public. I'm proud to be involved with and to support FHS!

Board Member

Rating: 5

Finding effective, sensible and accountable not-for-profit and charity groups that represent and implement the expectations of individual and corporate patron giving criteria, is as difficult as it is for these groups to find patrons who are willing to gift. It appears that the Great Nonprofits Giving Guide provides a helpful tool for those wanting to both give and receive. In other words - without a guide, finding a suitable home for donations is as difficult as finding donations for a worthy cause. What a great public and private service!

As a volunteer member of the FHS board (who also pay their own travel, lodging and miscellaneous expenses), I'm quite willing to support an endorsed listing on this initiative.

"I feel that support for The Forest History Society will help recognize and celebrate the cultural and natural heritage of North America's rich forest history through responsible archival processes, educational applications and the accurate distribution of rare and valuable information, imagery and documentation by a very capable team of officers, managers and staff members".

It's credibility and useful societal importance comes with my highest respect for those who lead and power it's operation.

1

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I have been a volunteer at the Forest History Society for six months and it has been a very interesting and rewarding experience. The staff is very knowledgeable and passionate about their mission.

The library’s projects bring forest history information to everyone — researchers, students, and the general public. It is a pleasure to assist the staff in organizing and making this content available at the library and online.

1

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 5

Like a bag of movie popcorn, the image collection of the FHS draws you in and keeps you wanting more. Very well organized and accessible on-line. I contacted the FHS in need of photos for publications and exhibits. With the assistance of their professional staff, I was delighted with the result. So glad the staff shared my enthusiasm for these projects. So I became a member. Love the magazine, journal and e-newsletter. Now when I research a topic I always include past articles from the magazine.

1 Marshall2

Volunteer

Rating: 5

Volunteering at the Forest History Society has been a great experience. The service they provide is invaluable to researchers and conservationists working on a wide variety of projects. They are constantly looking for innovative ways to improve their services and raise awareness of issues that are crucial not only to specialists but to the public as a whole. The staff is accommodating and a real pleasure to work with. They are always open to input and truly love what they do.