Over 1.8 million nonprofits and charities for donors, volunteers and funders

2012 Top-Rated Nonprofit

Colorado House Rabbit Society

2,042 pageviews

Claim This Nonprofit

More Info

Add to Favorites

Share this Nonprofit

Donate

Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Animal Protection & Welfare, Animals

Mission: Domestic pet rabbits were rescued and placed with adopting families.

Programs: Domestic pet rabbits were rescued, given shelter and placed in homes. Rabbits receive medical care, neuter and spay and are socialized prior to placing in homes.

education and information were provided to the general public and local veterinarians and adoptive owners. Newsletters are printed and sent and information packets are distributed.

Community Stories

24 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

Donor

Rating: 5

My wife and I wanted a pet for a while but could not decide what to get. About 2.5 years ago a cottontail rabbit started spending most of it's time in our yard so we built a hutch out of branches and it loved to hang out in there. We love this rabbit and know we want a pet rabbit or two for our home. We hope to get the pet rabbit from Colorado House Rabbit Society. I also want to volunteer there. Rabbits are awesome!

Client Served

Rating: 1

I inherited a 5 year old bunny from a good friend who went into hospice care... I have known this friend the entire time she cared for this bunny - it was very special to her. I called CHRS because folks said they could help.. I simply wanted to ask about resources of good people that might adopt as I felt I didn't have the time to devote properly to this sweet animal. I got some earful for 20 minutes about how the bedding was wrong, the food was wrong, the vet was wrong, point blank telling me that the bunny would die if I continued doing what (the guardian) had been doing for this bunny for a full five years. The woman told me I shouldn't have taken the bunny in because I didn't know what I was doing... and that "I didn't have the skills" to care for rabbits. Sheesh.

Beatrix

General Member of the Public

Rating: 5

Colorado House Rabbit Society is a wonderful organization for rabbits and their humans. CHRS is also a member of House Rabbit Society, an international rabbit rescue and education organization. Hop to it and support CHRS and HRS!

Volunteer

Rating: 5

Enter the Bunny Barn. Now stand very still, you will hear something subtle. What is that soft, gentle sound? It is the sound of contented bunnies munching the fresh hay that has just been carefully packed into their hay crates. It’s a very small, very crunchy sound. The faces of the bunnies tell you all you need to know. They have the “happy bunny” light in their eyes. They know that the volunteers at Colorado House Rabbit Society have come here to help feed them and care for them for the simple reason that bunnies exude joy just by being bunnies, and their presence is a constant invitation for you to share in it.
The volunteers at CHRS accept this lapine invitation to joyfulness. It is contagious. In all weathers, at all times of day, and doing many different things, the volunteers come to help the buns. After a short time in the bunny barn, the volunteers exude joy, too. It’s impossible not to when so many little friends bound forward to meet you – to take a papaya pill from your hands, or place themselves at the front of their pens in such a way that you just have to stop and pet them. The folks who train the volunteers and coordinate the volunteer efforts have extensive knowledge about rabbit habits and character and give the same kind of gentle, kind attention to volunteers as the rabbits do.
It is really a delight for the soul to spend time with the humans who care for the bunnies. There is real altruism in the caring for the rabbits. Well, that’s not completely true – you do get something in return: You get bright, cheerful bunny faces, little leaps and binkies, sometimes little kisses, and always the good company of your fellow volunteers. And you get to hear the whisper of happy hay munching.

Previous Stories

Volunteer

Rating: 5

Enter the Bunny Barn. Now stand very still, you will hear something subtle. What is that soft, gentle sound? It is the sound of contented bunnies munching the fresh hay that has just been carefully packed into their hay crates. It’s a very small, very crunchy sound. The faces of the bunnies tell you all you need to know. They have the “happy bunny” light in their eyes. They know that the volunteers at Colorado House Rabbit Society have come here to help feed them and care for them for the simple reason that bunnies exude joy just by being bunnies, and their presence is a constant invitation for you to share in it.

The volunteers at CHRS accept this lapine invitation to joyfulness. It is contagious. In all weathers, at all times of day, and doing many different things, the volunteers come to help the buns. After a short time in the bunny barn, the volunteers exude joy, too. It’s impossible not to when so many little friends bound forward to meet you – to take a papaya pill from your hands, or place themselves at the front of their pens in such a way that you just have to stop and pet them. The folks who train the volunteers and coordinate the volunteer efforts have extensive knowledge about rabbit habits and character and give the same kind of gentle, kind attention to volunteers as the rabbits do.

It is really a delight for the soul to spend time with the humans who care for the bunnies. There is real altruism in the caring for the rabbits. Well, that’s not completely true – you do get something in return: You get bright, cheerful bunny faces, little leaps and binkies, sometimes little kisses, and always the good company of your fellow volunteers. And you get to hear the whisper of happy hay munching.

Gye C.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

My husband and I have been volunteering with COHRS since 1997 when we were introduced my a mutual friend and bunny lover. During this time, the group has grown from a couple dozen rabbits housed in a basement to more than 100 of them in their own shelter with skylights, hay barn, organic veggie garden, outdoor exercise pens, and gift shop. The enthusiasm, dedication and compassion that the army of organizers and volunteers exhibits is impressive in the extreme. The constant and daunting struggle for funding and space has not discouraged this group from pursuing their dream of a world where every bunny is loved. Their unwavering resolve and crystal clear vision have contributed to major advances in animal rights legislation as well as veterinary medicine. We have witnessed many miraculous recoveries from maladies that had previously proved fatal in most instances. Sepsis from GI stasis is one of the most common causes of "sudden" death in rabbits because it progresses so quickly that many caregivers don't recognize the symptoms until it's too late. By educating adopters on preventive measures, raising awareness of critical first signs and teaching emergency countermeasures, many lagomorph lives have been extended. I personally was able to save the life of my beloved Chico countless times without expensive trips to the vet, just by employing those countermeasures. Head-tilt is also common in rabbits. The causes for this have traditionally been fatal in the vast majority of cases, but recent advances in understanding the triggers have saved many lives. Sadly, the wry-neck or tilted head is still usually a permanent after effect. Again, the refusal of this entirely volunteer group to take "permanent affliction" for an answer has led to miraculous improvement in posture and mobility! Just imagine how many more miracles there might be if this group had a reliable source of sufficient funding. Please endorse the miracle workers at Colorado House Rabbit Society. Thank you.

1

Professional with expertise in this field

Rating: 5

This organization actively promotes and advises the community on house rabbit care and provides a shelter. They rescue and rehabilitate homeless rabbits and subsequently provide spayed or neutered rabbits for adoption. They are run by solely volunteers. We need more support in the rabbit community by organizations like this. There is a true need for general education to the public about house rabbit care and needs. The issue with homeless/abandoned rabbits goes without saying. Thank you for what you have done!

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I feed the bunnies once a week. I go in at about 4:30 and wash and clean the vegetables. Then proceed to cut up the carrots or other crunchy veges. Slice the bananas and then feed the bunns. Also IL help others where needed. Its great interacting and talking to them.

Client Served

Rating: 5

I wanted to take a moment and tell you about the Colorado House Rabbit Society and the great work they do. Several years ago my daughter talked me into getting a rabbit. She lost interest quickly and the care of Marty soon fell on me alone. I found the CHRS on the web and attend an educational class. The class was amazing and my rabbit’s life benefited immediately.

Soon after Marty suffered a bout of E. cuniculi , a sometimes deadly parasite attack. I will never forget calling the hotline at 4 AM, getting an answer on the 2nd ring and getting the direction I needed to save Marty’s life.

Several months later I was again at the CHRS getting my rabbit a mate so he would not be alone. Again the CHRS understood the process and today Marty and Karly are doing great.

The CHRS provides rescue, education and adoption resources. But more than that, they are the experts on rabbits and always willing to share and help.
and help others understand this charity

Client Served

Rating: 5

I have had my rabbits for 9+ years now. Thanks to the House Rabbit Society my rabbits are still healthy and thriving! Nancy and some of the other volunteers have helped me in so many ways with my rabbits. I can bring my rabbits there or call any of the volunteer's to get their help with grooming or any other health concerns I have. I have learned so much from the HRS because you can tell that they are devoted and very passionate about the care and well being of rabbits everywhere. Some of the simple tips that the volunteers have giving me for my rabbits have made a world of difference for my rabbits life's. Because of the class I took there (the bunny tune up class) I was able to save one of my rabbit’s life by simply learning basic fundamentals and how to take her temperature. By learning what to look for I have become so much more in tune with my rabbits and I am much more confident that I am doing everything I can to make sure they live a healthy, happy and long life.

Renata F.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

The Colorado House Rabbit Society is made up of very dedicated and caring people. I have volunteered with them for many years and I've adopted several rabbits from this chapter. My experience has been nothing but positive. Colorado HRS is very careful to see that all the bunnies are going to loving, appropriate homes and ensure adopters know about rabbit health, care, and behavior before bringing their new friend home.

Client Served

Rating: 5

I got three rabbits from Colorado HRS over a period of about 2 years. Nancy LaRouche was sensitive to what kinds of rabbits I wanted and was incredible with managing the adoption process. One rabbit was a confirmed bachelor, so I got him by himself. The other two took Nancy about a week to find a partner for the one we wanted (my little girl "Angel" was picky) but she persevered and I got two loving bunnies out of that matchup. All the people at CO HRS are caring and loving people and the bunnies and those of us bunny parents are the better for it. I have since moved out of state but I am still in touch with these people at least three or four times a year. I get nutrition information and medical advice from them, and I recently bought my calendars from them, but no matter what my need, they have always been responsive and helpful.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I volunteered at the CO-HRS from September 2008 until i moved from the area in the spring of 2011. Being new to the area, I had a hard time finding my niche, but the CO-HRS welcomed me in with open arms. I truly looked forward to my "work" at the shelter every Friday and I miss the people that became my friends, and the rabbits that I adored caring for and petting. If you're looking for a caring, supportive, and congenial volunteer opportunity, seek out the CO-HRS. You'll be happy you did!

Client Served

Rating: 5

I love having rabbits in the house. They are some of the most cheerful animals I've ever seen. One of our bunnies loves the bounce of the couch. He spins and sprints from one side to the other, sometimes overshooting the edge like Wyle E Coyote. I don't know why his people originally surrendered him to an animal shelter. In that shelter his nose was nearly bitten off by another animal. The shelter prepared to put him down since he was officially unadoptable, but they called HRS first. And, because of the years HRS has spent working with neighborhood veterinarians, it was a small operation to stitch his nose back together. When I was looking to adopt a bunny, he sat in his crate and drank up all the love I could give him through the bars. So I adopted him--and found out that those minutes I spent petting him was the last time he intended to sit still for anything. He likes cheerful havoc, if you can imagine such a thing. Fortunately, HRS was there again to provide advice for me and toys for him. We've learned to share the couch.

General Member of the Public

Rating: 5

I adopted 2 rabbits from my local shelter. I was only going to get one, but they said that rabbits were social animals and would do better with a partner. I picked out another one, and went home to let one heal from being spade, then tried to put them together as a pair according to the shelter's instructions. It was not successful. After talking with the shelter several times about my predicament, they referred me to the Colorado House Rabbit Society. I spoke with Nancy who told me what I was doing wrong, and how to make my 2 rabbits a happy pair. I then took their bunny "tune-up" class which was fabulous and gave me lots of info on how to keep my buns healthy and happy. It is a truly remarkable place and the care and knowledge that the people there have is amazing. Kudos to all of you!!!

Donor

Rating: 5

The Colorado House Rabbit society has been phenomenal in helping us keep our rabbits healthy and happy. We moved to Colorado 6 years ago from Dallas with a down right mean female lop that had been given away numerous times by our boss, only to be returned within days. She was a biter. We couldn't part with her, though, and she made the 750 miles trip to her new high altitude home. Here kind vet recommended the HRS to us, and we immediately visited them in Broomfield. They advised having her spade and partnered. We never imagined she would get along with another being, but amazingly there was a bunny guy out there that was actually compatible with our wererabbit. We're happy to say the partnership of Dusty and Daisy is still a total love affair, tho occasionally Daisy still gets in a snit and punishes her humans. The HRS has helped us with instantaneous medical advise, tuneup classes, safe rabbit food and toys, and fun and enlightenment at their Spring Flings. Thank you, Colorado House Rabbit Society.

Client Served

Rating: 5

The volunteers of the Colorado HRS have saved our rabbits' lives numerous times. They are a phenomenal resource for rabbit care and health. We have adopted 3 rabbits from them over the past 12 years. They are the most responsible organization requiring that all adopters attend a training class (rabbit tune-up classes) that inform owners about proper care for your rabbit and things to watch for...even if you are an experienced bunny caregiver. I trust their volunteers more than most vets, except for the few that specialize in bunnies. Also, I purchase all of my bunny pellets from them and use them as a resource to find qualified boarders to watch the bunns when we are out of town.

Client Served

Rating: 5

This is a remarkable organization which has as its single goal the care and well-being of rabbits. I cannot recommend it highly enough! The focus of the group is entirely rabbit-centric, and in addition to matching bunnies with humans, and providing a plethora of sources of useful information, the COHRS also provides a wide range of products and foods for rabbits. Finally, on a personal note, this organization has also helped me personally to deal with the loss of some of my very dear rabbit friends, a debt I can never fully repay!

Client Served

Rating: 5

Prior to working with the house rabbit society I had rabbits as pets but didn't realize how much of a personality rabbits had and I certainly didn't realize we could have a relationship with our rabbit, now rabbits. This organization really opened my eyes to the possibilities and helped to have a common ground with others who also has house rabbits. I could not have gotten this anywhere else! Any other place also listed info on how to breed and show rabbits but never did they offer info on how to live with them and how to have rabbits as pets/companions.

David63

Client Served

Rating: 5

We had a lonely tiny bunny who was looking for a housemate, and we were amazed and pleased with the matching process at Colorado House Rabbit Society. For a very inexpensive fee, they kept our bunny for several days while they tried him out with several of the potential partners we had selected, until just the right one because his personal cage-mate. Now we watch the two of them snuggle, lick each other's ears, and run and bounce playfully together through the house.

Client Served

Rating: 5

Ten years ago I moved to Colorado with my little rabbit "Tej." He had a hard time adjusting to the high altitude and I ended up going to the House Rabbit Society for help with some of his medical issues. I cannot say enough about this amazing organization and of the kindness and dedication shown to me by Nancy LaRoche. Time and time again she helped me through various medical issues with my little Tej, never expecting anything in return. When Tej finally passed, I adopted other rabbits from the House Rabbits Society. Each has brought me so much joy and happiness and the work and dedication of the volunteers at this remarkable organization is truly amazing. They are constantly at work rescuing, adopting and finding good homes for so many rabbits. A vet I know in Colorado once referred to the Nancy LaRoche and the House Rabbits Society as the "Guardian angels of all rabbits, big and small." They work so hard to give each rabbit a wonderful life and the additional funds could save the lives of many rabbits. Please find it in your heart to help them as the love they give to their rabbits and the joy their adopted bunnies bring into the lives of others, is truly priceless. Patrica Belanger, Colorado