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2 reviews

Review for Project Hope - The People-To-People Health Foundation, Inc., Millwood, VA, USA

Rating: 1 stars  

Come on Project Hope - update your website with the truth about the Basra Children's Hospital in Iraq that you said that would be opened in 2006, then 2007, 2008....It still isn't opened, and you never had the integrity to admit that as a US Defense contractor, you don't want to ruffle their feathers. I encourage anyone considering working with Project Hope to understand that they are working for the US Defense Department, just as USAID did in Vietnam. You won't be considered as a neutral aid worker by anyone in the field.

What I've enjoyed the most about my experience with this nonprofit is...

that they rarely stay in country for more that a week.

The kinds of staff and volunteers that I met were...

arrogant and ignorant.

If this organization had 10 million bucks, it could...

buy liability insurance for their shoddy workmanship on the Childrens Hospital they are trying to build in Iraq.

Ways to make it better...

they had told the truth to the State Department and to Congress.

In my opinion, the biggest challenges facing this organization are...

transforming themselves into the official humanitarian arm of the Defense Department and working as civil servants.

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2009

Role:  Professional with expertise in this field & I worked on Provincial Reconstruction in Iraq for four years.

Review for Wired International, Montara, CA, USA

Rating: 2 stars  

I worked as a US contractor in Iraq for a number of years. Although Wired did attempt to establish a presence in Iraq, their claims (which remain on their website) of having any working sites there are greatly exaggerated. At best, they installed some outdated computer equipment that regularly crashed, and they provided no sustainability, leaving those of us who actually stayed in the country facing the anger of medical students and doctors in numerous locations. Furthermore, they attempted to use their connections with the Bush Administration to divert funds from primary care programs for Iraqi women and children to support complex and expensive telecommunications systems that they had promised to the Iraqi government and failed to deliver on. The USAID country director was able to stop them, but it resulted in a major hit on her career. Bottom line is well meaning, but misguided techie folks with no understanding of how to implement development projects in poor countries. Negative impact on other US NGOs is a big minus to any pluses they may bring. Minus two starts for that. Also, for a techie non-profit, you would think that they would update their website to reflect reality now and then. Self hype is another star loser.

The kinds of staff and volunteers that I met were...

knew their telecommunications equipment. Didn't care to learn about the customers or country.

Ways to make it better...

They had not come in on two week tourist visits with the attitude of "we know it all," and had actually spent some time with people who stayed on the ground the whole time.

In my opinion, the biggest challenges facing this organization are...

what to do when the computers break and you are already gone from the country, and getting something newer out to the developing world than discarded versions of PCs.

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2008

Role:  Professional with expertise in this field & I have led or worked on USAID funded health sector development projects in several post-conflict countries.