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SEPSIS ALLIANCE
August 1, 2014

Sepsis Alliance. I cannot possibly say enough good things about this nonprofit.

I lost my dear Mom to Sepsis in 2010. I didn't understand what it was. I thought it was "blood poisoning." Sepsis can be caused by blood poisoning or any infection anywhere in the body, but it is really a syndrome, a series of events.

I have learned so much about Sepsis from the wonderful people at Sepsis Alliance. The Sepsis Alliance website has a wealth of information about this condition.

The Sepsis Alliance Facebook page is an awesome source of information as well, but even more, it allows you to interact with survivors of Sepsis and other people who have lost a loved one to this fast-moving, insidious thing - Sepsis.

Sepsis is one of the most little-known killers in the minds of most people. Most have no idea what it is and how, seemingly out of nowhere, it can kill with lightning speed or leave survivors with devastating side effects.

I don't know where I'd be today if I had not found Sepsis Alliance.

Ways to make it better...

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

No changes to the organization but if I could I would be more involved. My job leaves so little time.

More feedback

Will you volunteer or donate to this organization?

Definitely

How much of an impact do you think this organization has?

Life-changing

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2014

MY ROLE:
General Member of the Public

SEPSIS ALLIANCE
November 16, 2012

Sepsis Alliance continues its amazing work to raise awareness of Sepsis, a condition often overlooked, unheard of by patients and treated too late. Sepsis kills about 260,000 people per year in the United States alone, yet most people don't know what it is or what to look for in recognizing it. Sepsis is a medical emergency which requires immediate care in a hospital emergency room, usually followed by further care in an ICU unit. Sepsis Alliance's website has incredible resources and videos to educate the public on this horrifying condition and a wonderful, supportive Facebook page which is open to survivors of Sepsis, families and friends of those who did or did not survive and any interested party. It is a truly worthy cause and has changed my life.

More feedback

Will you volunteer or donate to this organization?

Definitely

How much of an impact do you think this organization has?

Life-changing

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2012

MY ROLE:
General Member of the Public

SEPSIS ALLIANCE
March 5, 2012

Sepsis Alliance has given a whole new purpose to my life: to help spread awareness of Sepsis and Septic Shock, a condition not many have heard of, but which kills 258,000 people in the US every year. After the death of my Mom due to Septic Shock, I found Sepsis Alliance on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/sepsisalliance and I felt empowered to help spread the word about this horrible illness which affects so many people. The work Sepsis Alliance does is amazing and I'm proud to help in any way I can. This is my Mom's story, from "Faces of Sepsis" on Sepsis Alliance's website, which is http://www.sepsisalliance.org/ : "I saw my Mom, Joyce Przybylski, on Saturday, May 8, 2010, the day before Mothers Day. I brought her a card and chocolates. She had a chill. Nothing more. No fever, no wounds, no indwelling catheters. "Just" a chill.

I asked her if she wanted to go to the doctor to get checked out (she was 73). She said "Oh, goodness no Larry, I'm sure it's just a 24-hour thing, but thank you for asking, honey." Then she smiled. Mom always smiled.

I called her the next day and she said she thought she felt somewhat better but assured me that if she didn't feel totally better by the next day, Monday, she would go to the doctor. She sounded completely lucid. The next morning, my Dad called me at work. He was crying. He said that I should get to their local hospital right away (a Level 1 Trauma Center, by the way), that Mom was "in really bad shape." When I got there, Mom knew who I was, was talking and certainly didn't look, to me, like she would never recover. The doctors said she was in septic shock but I didn't comprehend what they were talking about. They did explain it to us, but I still didn't "get it."

After stabilizing Mom the best they could in the ER, they took her to the ICU. Later that day, within one hour or so, she went from talking and even smiling a bit, to being in an induced coma, having a ventilator, eight IV bags going through infusion pumps, being on kidney dialysis, receiving blood plasma, and it goes on and on. The medical staff tried so hard.

Two days later, the team of doctors tending to Mom around the clock told us that she had a "near zero" chance of recovery and to prepare ourselves the best we could for her passing. I called for the Priest Chaplain who came and gave Mom the Last Rites of the Church, which was a great comfort to me and was something Mom would have wanted. Not long after that, she passed from this life. My Mom was the sweetest, most loving, kind and accepting woman I have ever known. Never in my wildest nightmare could I have foreseen the ravages this disease causes."

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More feedback

Will you volunteer or donate to this organization?

Definitely

How much of an impact do you think this organization has?

Life-changing

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2012

MY ROLE:
General Member of the Public