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July 14, 2013
2 people found this review helpful

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July 14, 2013
2 people found this review helpful

I have been a regular weekly volunteer for the Wild Bird Fund for a year, and I am so grateful that this place exists to help injured wildlife. Injured birds arrive in every day, and each one is cared for and given the best medical attention. Just recently a Brant Goose was brought in with a badly damaged leg, and thanks to the skilled veterinarians at the Wild Bird Fund he was operated on, survived, and was able to be released back to the wild.

I have also been lucky enough to attend bird releases both in Central Park and around New York. Last week I released a pigeon that had come in with a damaged foot, and watching him fly away and then landing on his healed foot was one of the most rewarding experiences of volunteering with the Bird Fund.

A great organization that really puts the animals first.

Ways to make it better...

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

Add more centers so that more birds could be accommodated.

More feedback...

Would you volunteer for this group again?

Definitely

For the time you spent, how much of an impact did you feel your work or activity had?

Life-changing

Did the organization use your time wisely?

Very Well

Would you recommend this group to a friend?

Definitely

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2013

May 15, 2013
1 person found this review helpful

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May 15, 2013
1 person found this review helpful

I began volunteering with an informative orientation session - there were eleven of us there
varying in age from seniors to a high school student. The session was highly informative and
inspiring, from New York's situation as a major flyover to the WBFs role in caring (and
releasing)
injured and ill birds and small animals. While we were there several people came in with injured birds.
I have been there numrous times now, and that has always been the case. Referrals have consistently been made by the Central Park Conservancy, Animal Care and Control, and the Audubon Society just to name a few - they know they can rely on the Center's professionalism. Last week someone came in from Long Island City with a bird that had been shot with a bb gun and a salesperson from Third Avenue arrived with an injured Woodcock thatd he had found huddled under a construction overhang. The care is gentle, professional,and impressive and is often used as a
teaching opportunity. Representatives from the Center visit schools and programs for young people, including The New York Historical Society education center for children. It also encourages young volunteers to gain certificates and and develop an enduring commitment to caring for wildlife.

Ways to make it better...

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

want them to be able to afford a larger staff as they are the only rehab center in New York and treat over 1,000 birds and animals a year. They are a new organization and are working wonders with a small permanent staff and a large number of committed volunteers. They need donations, they put them to good use.

More feedback...

Would you volunteer for this group again?

Definitely

For the time you spent, how much of an impact did you feel your work or activity had?

A lot

Did the organization use your time wisely?

Very Well

Would you recommend this group to a friend?

Definitely

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2013

May 9, 2013
1 person found this review helpful

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May 9, 2013
1 person found this review helpful

A couple of months ago, together with a wonderful woman and her wonderful 10 year old daughter, I rescued an injured pigeon on Broadway, in New York City. All of us had seen the bird in distress and wanted to help.

We took the pigeon to the Wild Bird Fund Center here in Manhattan, where
she received excellent care. She had been suffering from "tanglefoot," the result of heartless humans putting glue on their window ledges to keep pigeons away. Her llittle feet and wings had gotten tangled up in the glue and could not move, and she had scraped off some of her feathers in trying vainly to free herself.

The Wild Bird Fund Center cleaned her and performed skilled surgery on her, removing the glued areas from her feet. They kept her for several weeks until she was recovered and strong enough to be released. We three rescuers had a lovely little ceremony releasing her back on Broadway where she had been found (this is the preferred release). It was joyous to watch her fly into the treetops and then into the sky.

I have rescued many pigeons, and taken many to the Wild Bird Fund Center. They are the only wildlife rehabilitation center in New York City, and they deserve our support. They receive no funding from government agencies, and rely entirely on donations. Please consider making a tax-deductible donation, and please visit their two wonderful websites.


Deborah Tanzer, Ph.D.

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When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2013

May 7, 2013
1 person found this review helpful

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Review from Guidestar
May 7, 2013
1 person found this review helpful

If there is a bird whisperer Rita McMahon is it !!! She is a devoted to Wildlife Rescue and is truly compassionate about saving lives. I have experienced her expertise hands on and her loyalty to the birds and her establishment . This is what drew me in to become a Wildlife Rehabilitator and volunteer at the Wild Bird Fund. She is also a wonderful teacher and is very patient. This energy resinates throughout the center with lovely volunteers that care about all the patients and running the facility as a whole. We all work together and try to create a peaceful healing environment for all the patients. I truly support this organization and will take time out from my busy day as a Celebrity & Fashion Make Up Artist to come and help Rita at the Rehabilitation Center. She has also saved my pet Doves leg with her maticulous leg splinting and medical attention. She is my Hero!

More feedback...

Would you volunteer for this group again?

Definitely

For the time you spent, how much of an impact did you feel your work or activity had?

Life-changing

Did the organization use your time wisely?

Very Well

Would you recommend this group to a friend?

Definitely

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2013

May 4, 2013
1 person found this review helpful

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Review from Guidestar
May 4, 2013
1 person found this review helpful

The Wild Bird Fund is a wonderful place to work. I've been a volunteer for two years.

Wild birds and other animals, usually sick and injured and in very bad shape, are brought in for treatment from all over New York City, including the outer boroughs. Especially during the spring and fall
we receive many birds that have been injured flying into windows while migrating through NYC, as we’re on the Atlantic flyway, and Central Park is a nice place for avian R&R.

We treat lots of baby birds, songbirds, waterfowl large and small, birds of prey, squirrels, opossums and many others.

The staff is dedicated to healing these animals, works long and hard to rehabilitate them, and always hopes to return them to the wild or find adopters for individuals that can’t survive on their own.


More feedback...

Would you volunteer for this group again?

Definitely

For the time you spent, how much of an impact did you feel your work or activity had?

A lot

Did the organization use your time wisely?

Very Well

Would you recommend this group to a friend?

Definitely

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2013

May 4, 2013
1 person found this review helpful

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May 4, 2013
1 person found this review helpful

Out of all the centers I investigated to volunteer at, the WBF impressed me as the most well-organized, clean, and professional. Since starting there I've only had that impression confirmed. Not every animal that's brought in makes it - that is, unfortunately, the reality of how badly-off many of the animals they receive are. But every single one of them receives a quality of care that most professional veterinary clinics would be hard-pressed to provide, care that gives them a chance they simply wouldn't have had otherwise. I'm amazed at what they do, and encourage you to check them out for yourself!

More feedback...

Would you volunteer for this group again?

Definitely

For the time you spent, how much of an impact did you feel your work or activity had?

Life-changing

Did the organization use your time wisely?

Very Well

Would you recommend this group to a friend?

Definitely

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2013

May 3, 2013
1 person found this review helpful

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May 3, 2013
1 person found this review helpful

The recent one-star review printed here was appalling. The comments were distorted, misdirected, misperceived and totally inaccurate. Has the author ever heard of checking sources? Has the author spent any time at the WBF Center to see first-hand what goes on there? More significant: the author’s self-righteous tone speaks deep volumes about him/her—not the organization.

Way before the dedicated WBF Rehab Center existed, I had a strikingly positive experience with the founder, who returned my phone call to reassure me about a duck family found in my local community garden (they were collected and released in the North Lake in Central Park). Her simple gesture of returning a phone call from a concerned stranger set the stage for what has become a commanding influence in the city’s birding and small animal community.

It is due to her astonishing and powerful commitment to healing wild birds and small animals, that has attracted so many talented, exceptional, dedicated and like-minded people to the WBF Center for Rehabilitation and Education.

With all due modesty, I am one of them. My contribution however, is upstairs in the reception area, the perfect location to witness the myriad people clamoring to get the small, broken creatures they find in the city the attention they need. To a person, they are distraught by the animals’ distress and simultaneously relieved to have ‘found’ the WBF. “How long have you been here?” they ask. “Thank God we found you.”

One of my tasks at the front desk is to tell people what we’re about (healing/helping animals in pain). And what happens to the animals they bring in (they’re examined, medically treated, fed, cleaned, cared for and returned to their natural habitats if possible, or euthanized if necessary). No animal at the Center is treated haphazardly or without great care, forethought and compassion. I have witnessed this time and time again. And I have witnessed the gratitude of the people who find the animals and bring them in, eagerly, breathlessly with great relief—time and time again.

The dedicated Center is only one-year-old, just about to start its second year. The growth has been phenomenal. People are learning about us and from us. They bring their children in to learn about birds and small animals in group activities the Center organizes. The Center holds lectures and short workshops on various aspects of animal care. Bird-watching and photography sessions are regularly held in Central Park. Volunteers sign-up by the dozens to learn about birds and how to care for them or to just be around other people who care, who contribute and want to help heal wild creatures who can’t help themselves.

I am getting so much more than I’m giving to the Wild Bird Fund Rehab Center, and I am proud to be a part of it. And, by-the-way, that young person referred to in the review that has so incensed me, is more talented, competent, conscientious, compassionate, intelligent, mature and wise than any six people three times her age. I can only hope I’ll be around when she becomes the remarkable veterinarian she is destined to be.

More feedback...

Would you volunteer for this group again?

Definitely

For the time you spent, how much of an impact did you feel your work or activity had?

Life-changing

Did the organization use your time wisely?

Very Well

Would you recommend this group to a friend?

Definitely

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2013

May 3, 2013
2 people found this review helpful

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May 3, 2013
2 people found this review helpful

it's so traumatic to find an injured bird or small mammal in NYC and not know how to help it. The Wild Bird Fund is always there to help and is deeply interested in helping the animals I bring in. The people there are wonderful. They are committed angels, essential to this city.

More feedback...

How would you describe the help you got from this organization?

A lot

How likely are you to recommend this organization to a friend?

Definitely

How do you feel you were treated by this organization?

Very Well

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2013

April 27, 2013
3 people found this review helpful

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April 27, 2013
3 people found this review helpful

I just read the wild bird fun newsletter. Really shocking. No wonder many birds are not doing their best. What kind of medical organization has a 14 year old doing procedures and boasting about it! I don't care how competent she is. I think it's irresponsible. Shame on you. I'll never bring an animal to this center again and will do my best to alert others to it. Rita Mcmahon should not be bragging about such things!
I agree with previous entries about the center. Good idea but no thanks.

More feedback...

How would you describe the help you got from this organization?

A little

How likely are you to recommend this organization to a friend?

No

How do you feel you were treated by this organization?

Somewhat badly

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2013

February 7, 2013
2 people found this review helpful

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February 7, 2013
2 people found this review helpful

As a wildlife rehabilitator and a volunteer with the WBF, I would like to respond to the two posts from January 21 and January 22, 2013, respectively.

I was present when the sick bird with lead poisoning was brought to the center at closing and remember the case quite well. Sadly, the
patient died. Sadly, the patient had lead poisoning. But it did not die from lack of care.

The pigeon presented with severe neurological symptoms as well as dehydration and was not in stable condition. The first step in treating any sick or injured animal is to stabilize the patient with supportive care: first you give fluids to correct life-threatening dehydration, then, if emaciated and starving, you administer basic, easy to digest, enteral foods. Then, and only when the bird is hydrated and stable, can you treat an illness like lead poisoning.

The next morning the bird was re-evaluated and determined to be stable enough for blood work. After a high lead level in the blood was identified, we started treatment with DMSA (dimercaptosuccinic acid). This is an agent that chemically binds to the lead so it can be flushed out of the system. However, the treatment is very rough on the patient’s body, particularly the kidneys. Such treatment can only be started when a bird is hydrated because the poisons have to be flushed from the system. Otherwise the very medicine that could save the patient will kill it.
Being a Good Samaritan for a sick animal is a noble calling. We are grateful that people like you exist in this city. We know all too well the trials and tribulations that patients and their caregivers go through before finding us and getting help. Sadly all too often, too much time has passed before a patient can get to us and then there is little we can do to turn the corner on a rapidly deteriorating case.

Regarding the other patient case mentioned on this site: to perform euthanasia, two people are required to sign off on a medical chart before that decision is made. It is never an easy, or lightly made decision. At least one person involved in the euthanasia must be a state or federally licensed rehabilitator.

If a patient displays symptoms consistent with Paramyxovirus (PMV), we take the case very, very seriously. We warn the rescuer of the possibility that the bird may never recover enough to go back to the wild. And then we go above and beyond, testing for lead and treating with antibiotics to cover the alternate possibilities of lead poisoning or meningitis. A viral disease like PMV is contagious, often deadly, and is associated with a very poor quality of life. So euthanasia is often the only humane alternative. I had a bird I was fostering die of PMV in my hands; it was a slow and wretchedly painful death. I was too hopeful for a recovery to consider a humane means for ending her suffering; I kept thinking she would pull through. To this day I regret that decision.

More feedback...

Would you volunteer for this group again?

Definitely

For the time you spent, how much of an impact did you feel your work or activity had?

Life-changing

Did the organization use your time wisely?

Very Well

Would you recommend this group to a friend?

Definitely

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2013

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