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Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Arts & Culture, Bands & Ensembles, Cancer, Health, Patient & Family Support

Mission: Empower young adults affected by cancer by (1) building community, (2) improving quality of life and (3) providing meaningful survivorship

Results: Time Magazine Best 50 Website FOX News Top 10 Healthcare Blog Stay Classy Award, Most Innovative Use Of Social Media Largest support community for the young adult cancer movement

Target demographics: Young adults, 18-39 and anyone who cares about supporting cancer patients in their late teens, 20s and 30s.

Direct beneficiaries per year: 250,000

Geographic areas served: Worldwide

Programs: OMG! Cancer Summit, The Stupid Cancer Forums, The Stupid Cancer Show, Stupid Cancer Boot Camps, Meetups, online social networking, content curation and aggregation + public awareness efforts.

Community Stories

49 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

8

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I learned about I2Y only about 1 year ago and it has honestly changed my life. I am a 13 year cancer survivor- I was diagnosed with Acute Leukemia my senior year in high school in a small town in upstate NY. This organization is something brand new that fills a huge gap that is something that I never realized (at the time) I was missing. A safe place to be with people who looked like me rather than my mom or grandma who were interested in the same issues I was/am. This organization is making a difference in lives of current young cancer patients and survivors everyday by providing access to resources, education on how to get what they need and how to process what's happening to them and offering a safe environment to be themselves around other young survivors who are going through the same things and to GET BUSY LIVING TOGETHER. I only wish that this had been there when I was diagnosed and I see everyday the difference we make to other young survivors.

4

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I'm 38 years old and have had lymphoma 5 times now since the year 2000. I can't think of another organization that I want fighting for my rights to further research than the folks at i{2}y!!!

5

Volunteer

Rating: 5

There is not much worse than having to hear the words "you have cancer", especially being between the ages of 15-39. It is such an isolating feeling to be swept from college, dating, new jobs and be thrown into the cancer community. The isolation ended when I came across the I'm Too Young For This Foundation. It provided that connection between others my age who have/are going through cancer. It also allowed me to laugh and not be so serious when dealing with Stupid Cancer (hence the name). It meant so much to me that I eventually started to give back and become a member of the leadership council. Young adults are a unique age group to get cancer with a whole new host of issues that i[2]y is fighting to break the trend of low survivor rates.

6

Volunteer

Rating: 5

Before I was officially diagnosed with osteosarcoma, in December 2005, I was sitting in the cafeteria at school with a friend, brainstorming causes for the random bump on my arm. My friend threw out the possibility that it might be cancer, which we both immediately eschewed, but we agreed (as ten-year-olds do) that cancer was the worst possible thing that could happen to a person. Fifteen years ago, even five years ago, it was. But that was before i2y came onto the scene, redefining the cancer experience in a way that loneliness and alienation became a thing of the past. My experience with i2y has been nothing but mind-blowing; for here is an organization, better yet - a network, of *real* patients and survivors who aren't trying to sugar coat the raw and humbling experience of cancer, but rather are facing it head on, together.

5

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I can't say enough about this organization or it's founder. Matthew Zachary has created not only an advocacy group, not only a support network, not only an online all-things-cancer-for-young-people resource guide, but a place where patients and survivors can become whole again.

11

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I was diagnosed with colon cancer at age 31. Since my diagnosis and remission, I have been active in i[2]y, and I couldn't ask for a better organization to be a part of. Their members are all friendly and kind, giving advice and (when needed) a shoulder to cry on. Their work towards bettering the lives of those diagnosed with cancer as a young adult will certainly make a difference in the lives of those coming up behind people like me. I wouldn't be where I am in my remission without Matthew Zachary and his crew. I am so so so grateful to be considered a part of this organization. Thanks to them all for making my recovery a little easier.

11

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I love this organization. Period. They are huge and raise a lot of money and awareness for young cancer patients and survivors. "Remission is not a cure." Despite being so big, they are totally down to earth and caring. I sent the founder Matthew Zachary and facebook message and got a reply in the same day. I don't get that from the more name brand cancer organizations.

11

Volunteer

Rating: 5

i2y is by far one of the most amazing groups I have ever had the privilege of being a part of. Its founder Matthew Zachary has done an amazing job in such a short period of time in making the world aware of us young adult cancer survivors, and the help that we need. If you know what is good for you, then you will learn more about i2y and help us spread the word. We cant do it without YOU!

10 kim.hicks

Volunteer

Rating: 5

i[2]y is the most relevant resource for young adults with cancer, or those who know such survivors. I am 28 years old, and a 3 time survivor-diagnosed first at the age of 15, then 19, then 22. I found myself feeling isolated, fitting neither with the pediatric cancer mold nor the aging adult cancer population. In this age group, we have such different concerns: dating, sexuality, career, education, health insurance, and other social needs. i[2]y offers a supportive and irreverent, fun venue to network with others and access various resources.