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October 30, 2014

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Review from Guidestar
October 30, 2014

with over a half century of experiance serving philanthropic individuals and serving on many non profit
boards .. i was honored and humbled to join the board of PFP
i was truly very impressed !!
the physicians and volunteers serving the needs of others, their compassion and dedication
is amazing
they truly touch one"s heart
November 27, 2012

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November 27, 2012

This organization works with ahost countries that request education and training for specific medical needs. I have gone on four missions and have met the most compasionate members of the medical and nursing communities through them. Their work enables thousands of meidcal peronal all around the world and provides care to hundreds of thousand more. T he relationshp are binding and ongoing and so the work continues after the first team leaves the next team builds on the relationshp and expertise of those who have come before. It is an exchange and cooperative learning. So honored to be a part of this group.

More feedback...

Would you volunteer for this group again?

Definitely

For the time you spent, how much of an impact did you feel your work or activity had?

Life-changing

Did the organization use your time wisely?

Very Well

Would you recommend this group to a friend?

Definitely

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2011

May 24, 2011
1 person found this review helpful

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Review from CharityNavigator
May 24, 2011
1 person found this review helpful

t box (I reattach your blog below so that you can copy it in).



Our team of two registered nurses, two occupational therapists and a psychologist has just returned from a four-day mission to Santiago, Dominican Republic. Our efforts were spent helping train healthcare
professionals in a developing world. We returned to the United States knowing we had made a difference in the lives of many. The commitment from Physicians for Peace and supporters made the mission possible.

We were greeted with warmth, enthusiasm and willingness to learn by doctors, nurses, therapists, psychologist, volunteers and other caregivers. In break-out sessions, our collective lectures were presented by those of us representing the medical delegation. Each lecture was on a topic that the burn center staff had requested.

We visited patient rooms, a wound care procedure in the operating room and observed the admission of a child with a severe electrical burn injury. These experiences opened my eyes to the opportunities and possibilities of suggested improved techniques. The burn center did not have the equipment we have in the States, which would have made care easier for the patient, doctors and nurses. I found myself wanting to go home and locate pieces of needed equipment to send to our partners in Santiago.

http://www.physiciansforpeace.org/files/images/IMG_0426.JPG
Cynthia Hester, R.N., with a nurse at the hospital burn unit.

Each of us presented suggestions to the director of the burn center, Dr. Renata Quintana, and Dr. Ramon Lopez, Director of the Americas for Physicians for Peace. The suggestions for improvement were accepted with an understood need. I truly believe each suggestion will be tried and hopefully become a standard of practice.

After six- to eight-hour days spent in the hospital, our hosts entertained us in grand fashion. A dinner in the backyard of a volunteer, a drive to the mountains to view the beautiful sunset, dine and dance and finally another outdoor dinner with the volunteers made our visit most enjoyable. We toured a cigar factory, enjoyed the museum to learn history of the country and drove through neighborhoods to get a better idea of residential living.

As long as Physicians for Peace and partner hospitals continue their amazing work and encourage involvement of medical professionals, there is hope for burn patients in underserved countries.

Learning new ideas and implementing change is often difficult. However, new friendships were made while older ones were strengthened. We volunteers are anxious to come together again for the next mission. How blessed I feel to have been a part of this life-changing mission.When all is said and done, it is ultimately about the patient.

The Great!

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

A mission volunteer

Ways to make it better...

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

I respect it as is

May 19, 2011
1 person found this review helpful

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Review from CharityNavigator
May 19, 2011
1 person found this review helpful

I have been on 4 trips to Africa with Physicians for Peace (PFP). Physicians for Peace is a program that promotes health care education. I work with the Maternal-Child Program .
In Monrovia Liberia we taught midwives and midwifery students how to use a partograph to improve birth
outcomes of mothers/babies by recognizing abnormal labor patterns and tranporting to a higher level facility when these abnormalities occur. We discussed pregnancy/delivery complications such as hypertension/preeclampsia and management of postpartum hemmorhage. We also taught basic newborn resuscitation. We utilized hand-on training to assure correct understanding.
I have gone to Pampaida millineum village in kaduna State, Nigeria twice. The first visit was 6 weeks of training of a doctor, nurse and village health workers in antenatal care, delivery and postpartum care of mothers and newborns. The goal was to encourage women in the village to deliver at the clinic instead of in their huts with traditional birth attendants. We utilized the book- A Book for Midwives from the Hesparian Foundation in the training. A postpartum hemorrhage was managed by the team and a maternal death averted.
On my second visit to the village, I taught newborn resuscitation. I taught the team how to make ventilation masks from plastic water bottles. We invited about 50 Traditional Birth Attendants to a meeting. We want to involve them in clinic deliveries as assistants. They will still be compensated by the family(not run out of their jobs) and can continue to provide emotional support for the women. When I began to teach the Newborn resuscitation, a Village Health Worker jumped up and asked to teach this. This is what it is all about- I teach 10 people and they turn around and teach 50. Rather than going into a country to deliver a few babies, PFP promotes education so that the skills are sustainable. We use the tools/ equipment that the people can continue with. I learned their methods for assessing, as well as sharing some of our methods. We sat down and "debriefed" after each delivery. They determining what went well and how we can improve.
My last trip was a fact Find visit in Niger State, Nigeria. A team of 5 visited 7 hospitals and clinics-both rural and urban and a couple of training schools for nurses, midwives and lab techs. I have been asked by the country's Midwifery Service Scheme to do a couple of training seminars on Newborn resuscitation, umbilical cord care and some midwifery techniques later this summer.
Physicians for Peace is dedicated to providing evidenced based education to help health professionals improve the health of their country. The trips are well organized, funds are provided for transportation and education.
I am proud to be associated with Physicians for Peace. They utilize the proverb: Give a man a fish and you fill his belly, Teach him to fish and he will not go hungry.

The Great!

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

I was able to see improvement in the antenatal care and birth practices. I have witnessed the Birth Team competently manage complications related to birth and successful resuscitation of a newborn.

Ways to make it better...

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

Provide more fund so more missions could occur.

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