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Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Animals, Environment, Natural Resources Conservation & Protection, Protection of Endangered Species, Wildlife Preservation & Protection, Wildlife Sanctuaries

Mission: The mission of the Northern Jaguar Project (NJP) is to preserve and recover the world's northernmost population of the jaguar, its unique natural habitats, and native wildlife under its protection as a flagship, keystone, and umbrella species.

Results: NJP and our Mexican conservation partner Naturalia have established the 50,000-acre Northern Jaguar Reserve, which encompasses prime jaguar habitat just 125 miles south of the Arizona border in Sonora, Mexico. Jaguars that roam this area now have a safe-haven sanctuary in the most remarkable, rugged wilderness left in northern Mexico.

Geographic areas served: Sonora, Mexico

Programs: -

Community Stories

6 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

Board Member

Rating: 5

It's such an honor to work with this wonderful organization that cares so deeply about preserving not only Jaguars but the breath taking habitat they live in.

Previous Stories
1

Volunteer

Rating: 5

Northern Jaguar Project is a wonderful organization that is trying to preserve not only one of the worlds most beautiful animals but also one of North Americas truly last wild places. I have been impressed by the genuine and caring nature of the staff at NJP who have selflessly given themselves to defending the northern most breeding population of jaguars left in North America.

I am so proud to be working alongside such wonderful individuals who work tirelessly to advocate and educate the surrounding community for the sake of preserving one of mother natures most wonderful ecosystems.

I cannot thank NJP enough for their hard work and dedication and I am excited to see what the future holds for not only the organization but for the northern jaguar.

Board Member

Rating: 5

As a volunteer since 2005, I have had nothing but positive interactions with NJP. They have an incredible vision and niche, doing more to conserve the northern jaguar than most other efforts combined. Their dedication to collaboration with the local communities of northern Sonora, in addition to their assistance in conservation land acquisitions, has engendered an unprecedented level of appreciation and support for jaguar conservation far outside the boundaries of the reserve.

Board Member

Rating: 5

As a board member I feel very fortunate to be associated with the other individuals that comprise the board of Northern Jaguar Project. They are dynamic and dedicated, recognized experts in their fields, and give to the project a lot of experience and knowledge, as well as a lot of hard work.
I personally worked early-on in identifying and purchasing the lands of the Northern Jaguar Reserve, which, along with local community based outreach and education, have been Northern Jaguar Project's greatest achievements. Together these projects should give permanent protection to the northernmost jaguar populations and all species under their umbrella. It has not been an easy task, and there is still a tremendous amount of work to be done, but 11 years after my first visit to the area, it is still sometimes hard to believe that we have a viable reserve in place and that the adjoining cattle ranching community is accepting our efforts and our assistance.
One of the keys to success has been our partnering with Naturalia A.C., a Mexican non-profit, to hold title to the reserve and help administer programs. With Naturalia's help we are better able to use Mexican professionals, students, and local labor, and thus the project is not seen so much as a foreign intrusion.

2

Board Member

Rating: 5

As a co-founder of the organization I have been intimately involved with its development and evolution since it began. I have been both surprised and very satisfied at the success of the organization to date. During the past 7 years, we have created an efficient cooperative relationship with our Mexican partner, Naturalia, A. C.; have raised the majority of the funding to acquire a 70-square mile wildlife reserve in Sonora, Mexico; have managed the reserve for landscape level restoration with preservation and expansion of all its wildlife populations; and have conducted on-going species inventories of wildlife, plants, birds, and butterflies. Our fund-raising and office expenses are a small proportion of our budget, the vast majority of which goes directly to support restoration and wildlife projects on the reserve. Our co-founder and treasurer, Rick Williams, developed the original concept for the Fotos Felinos project, which rewards neighboring ranchers for remote trip-camera photos of living carnivores. We have received surprisingly strong support from the Sonoran community nearest to the reserve and from the local cattle growers organization. We cooperate with the rural university closest to the reserve. We are a small, focused, practical, and efficient organization, with dedicated board members, each of whom brings a specific skill set to the group. Our one part-time employee is accomplished, efficient, creative, and very dedicated to the organization.

2 jeff12

Board Member

Rating: 5

work to help secure habitat and create and retain corrdors and conectiity in Mexico as well as bi nationaly. Provide medical intervention for the capitive population and provide educational and public awarness campaign support.

7

Board Member

Rating: 5

This is the only reserve to protect the females of the northern jaguar population which is somewhere between 800 and 1500. It is bi-nation (with Naturalia) and, to everyone's surprise,has been enthusiastically received. NJP/Naturalia now own and manage over 70 square miles and ten jaguars have been recorded. NJP/Naturalia started a camera-trap program which rewards ranchers for protecting the five felids. If they get a photo, they get a reward. This positive project is far better than paying for dead cattle. The reserve has many many volunteer researchers who keep finding new birds, plants, reptiles, etc at new geographic locations. The sanctuary will be the protected source for jaguars to return to the US and NJP is working on the corridor.