North Star Foundation

Rating: 4.31 stars   45 reviews

Issues:

Location: 20 Deerfield Ln Storrs CT 06268 USA

Mission: North Star Foundation was formed to help children who have developmental differences such as autism, or who must face challenges such as the loss of a parent, through the use of a specially bred and trained Assistance Dog. Our mission is to help children reach their social, emotional, and educational goals through the use of Animal-Assisted Therapy. We work with the children's existing therapists to help them incorporate their North Star dog into a child's therapeutic program. We travel to childrens' schools to present a program to their peers that promotes tolerance and understanding, as we believe there is no better way to teach tolerance than through the avenue of an Assistance Dog that is trained to help. We also work with children's families, teaching them how to use their North Star Dog to help smooth transitions and soothe anxiety for everybody on the homefront.
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Community Reviews

Rating: 5 stars   Featured Review

My son has autism, and Patty brought a beautiful soul into our lives in the form of a NorthStar golden retriever. In just a few days the puppy has had a positive effect on our son, and we are very excited to see what the coming years will bring for them together. We haven't started the training yet, but are excited to get going so our boy can reap the full benefit from his furry partner. Thank you NorthStar and Patty!

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

Working with Patty from NorthStar to find a great dog to help my son.

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

I beieve Patty is doing a great job.

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Rating: 1 stars  

2 people found this review helpful

Our NS dog was for our son with Aspergers. The dog was diagnosed with Epilepsy and Diabetes at 1 year old. North Star never paid for the first year of routine vet bills (per the contract), didn't pay the bill for our dog's specialist evaluation at 1 year and absolved themselves of anything to do with our dog, our son and our situation. $5,000 is A LOT of money to pay and have an organization have no responsibility for the outcome. NS refused to supply us with another dog, refused to pay any bills, and stopped replying to emails. Look elsewhere for help and have a lawyer if you go with NS.

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2010

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There are many inaccuracies in this "review," most of which are easy to prove...one is that we at North Star never paid for Moxie's training and vetting for her first year of life...this is untrue and I have all the cancelled checks in case anyone wants proof. Next, Moxie is an extremely well bred dog that has zero history of diabetes or seizures in her carefully bred line. Her trouble with seizures and diabetes began after she ingested FOUR brownies, and as chocolate is poisonous to dogs this is where I (as well as Moxie's vet) trace to the beginning of her seizures/epilepsy. It is the vet bills relating to this "indiscriminate eating" that we didn't cover, but we did cover the bill to have Moxie's hips cleared as one of the complaints Natalie had was that Moxie had hip dysplasia, which she does not as proved the the x ray they took of her hips at Texas A & M. Here are the words from Texas A & M's report on Moxie, followed by Natalie's own words of how well this placement was doing before Moxie ate the brownies (Moxie also ate part of a plant that caused her to "shake" and Texas A & M notes Moxie's history of "indiscriminate eating.") We do not have the funds and nor is it in our contract to cover vetting for dogs that suffer illness or disability based on indiscriminate eating; our contract is clear we will only cover routine vetting for our dogs' first year, unless a vet determines the cause of the disability is genetically based. This clearly is not the case here, and although I personally like this family very much, I can not take responsibility for what happened when Moxie ate the brownies and perhaps poisonous bush...either one of these documented incidents could have caused the resulting diabetes/seizures. I am not taking any steps to take Moxie away, but cannot certify her as a North Star dog due to her seizures and the necessary medications she must now take to prevent them. I am happy Natalie and her son clearly love Moxie and have no complaints on her end save her seizures/diabetes, and I hope and trust she is working well with Natalie's son inside their home. What happened was clearly an accident, but one where we cannot and will not take financial responsibility for; due to the fact that Natalie won't take any responsibility for what happened with Moxie we will not be making any new placements with her as I would be afraid of history repeating itself, but I do wish her and Moxie well, as I continue to care about Natalie's son and as I understand that he does love Moxie, my hope that at least something positive is coming from this placement. REPORT FROM TEXAS A & M UNIVERSITY ON NORTH STAR MOXIE "About 10 days ago, Moxie ate a small portion of brownie. Later that night, noticed that Moxie was polyuric, polydipsic, and began vomiting her water. She brought Moxie in to Dr. Kemble the following morning, where Moxie was diagnosed with diabetic ketoacidosis and pancreatitis. Moxie has since been on 12U of NPH every 12 hours and has not had any further issues with polyuria or polydipsia. She has also been on amoxicillin every 12 hours for her pancreatitis. This past Monday, Moxie was not given her evening dose of insulin to see if her diabetes had resolved after the treatment of her pancreatitis. Her blood glucose was 150 in the morning, and after missing her PM dose, was 326 with signs of polyuria and polydipsia. Her normal insulin regime was then resumed. Moxie is an indoor dog that has a cat as a housemate. She is current on heartworm prevention, and up until the beginning of this month, has only had a medical history of ear infections. She eats Royal Canin Gastrointestinal formula twice a day. Other than the medical issues stated above, Moxie is doing well at home (eating, drinking, defecating, and urinating normally)." From: "Natalie Sent: Saturday, February 26, 2011 12:33 PM To: "Patricia Gross" Subject: Moxie Good Morning Patty: Moxie is doing wonderfully. She is learning quickly and potty training issues are under control for the most part. I have a couple concerns - Paulie is increasingly frustrated with Moxie living away from us and is saying that she is not his dog since she doesn't live with us. The best bonding time they have is at night during the sleepovers - this is when Moxie is most apt to snuggle and she enjoys a treat on Paulie's bed. We would obviously have more of this time if she were with us full time. As a family I think we are ready for Moxie to live with us full time if you think it is the right time "big picture." It would give me greater opportunities for training during the day and more bonding times for Paulie. Kim is a FANTASTIC puppy raiser and I would love to keep her on as a puppy Aunt if possible :) If you think it is too soon or these issues are minor in the big scheme of things i understand. Natalie= From: "Natalie Sent: Thursday, April 07, 2011 9:15 AM To: "Patricia Gross" Subject: Re: Moxie > Patty: > Paulie and Moxie are doing well. He likes to have her in public but she is getting too big for him to control. Under adult supervision she does great but she still needs a lot of verbal prompts. So I let him take her to show her off when he wants to and I generally lead her through stores, restaurants, etc. Paulie likes to have Moxie in is room at bedtime and she sleeps in her crate next to his bed all night without any problems. He feeds her all her meals. She will go and nudge him in the morning to get him moving if he doesn't move to the food bowl right away. She sits patiently and waits for him to say "release" before eating. She is a WONDERFUL dog. Definitely still a puppy! She has her puppy moments - eating a hamburger out of Nate's hands (gently of course), we are still working on hopping (not quite jumping up anymore), and general mouthiness. But making great progress. She is a joy. From: "Natalie Sent: Thursday, June 23, 2011 1:02 PM To: "Patricia Gross" Subject: Moxie > Hi Patty: > Here are some photos of Moxie and Paulie at our friends river house. Moxie is a fish! She was in the water at Paulie's side the entire time - it was wonderful. She is such a blessing. > > Natalie From: "Natalie Sutto" Sent: Friday, December 23, 2011 8:41 AM To: "Patricia Gross" Subject: Re: Moxie > Patty: > Next week will be great for me to take Moxie to A&M. > > Moxie only ate 4 little 1in by 1in brownies - that is all that was cut and she licked the top. My husband threw out the rest of the pan. > I will cover Dr. Kemble's bills. > > Natalie > On Dec 22, 2011, at 4:05 PM, Patricia Gross wrote: > >> Hi Natalie, >> >> I finally touched base with Dr. Kemble...she is very nice. >> >> She thinks the pan of brownies that Moxie ate is responsible for the diabetes/pancreatitis stuff as her bloodwork from the week before was normal; chocolate is actually poisonous to dogs and this may solve part of the mystery... >> >> She also said she wanted to switch Moxie from Phenobarbitol to a different medication due to her sleepiness, but I don't want this to happen with her at your home due to the incident you described of Moxie snapping when she was seizing...I can't take the chance that Paulie will be scared or hurt if this happens again, so what I'd like to propose is to slowly wean her off the pheno over the weekend and have you take her to Texas A & M early next week to have a second opinion regarding the seizures before we continue to give her monthly medication for these. My vet of a decade plus here in Bolton CT is also going to take a look at her records to see if there is something Dr. Kemble might be missing...I do need to ask if Moxie had any injuries in the time you've had her, including any head injuries but also any incidents that might be relevant to the review that will be taking place in the coming week... >> >> Please let me know if you think these plans sound ok with you, and what day you can take her to Texas A & M next week. >> >> Regarding finances, we will cover the hip dysplasia should they confirm this at Texas A & M, and also cover Texas A & M's bills; you will need to cover the bills from Dr. Kemble related to the appointment after the brownie eating including the bloodwork and any treatments resulting from this episode, OK? >> >> Please let me know your thoughts... >> >> ~ Patty >> From: "Natalie Sent: Tuesday, December 27, 2011 9:07 AM To: "Patricia Gross" Subject: Re: Moxie > Patty: > Any word on an appointment? This week is best since it is a 3 hour drive each way and the boys are off school this week. Dr. Kemble has forwarded all info and spoken with T A&M. > > I am cc-ing Malinda, our trainer so that you may dialogue with her about any questions you may have. > > Dr. Kemble has been a great partner in caring for Moxie the entire time we've had her. Any incidences are documented in her chart. She nibbled on one of our bushes a while back and vomited, had a play date and later in the day started shaking - it is all in her chart. If anything, I call Dr. Kemble too often! > > I look forward to hearing the date and time of Moxie's appointment. > > Natalie From: Natalie Sent: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 3:22 PM To: Patricia Gross Subject: Fwd: Moxie's Discharge Instructions Patty: Attached is Moxie's report from Texas A&M. I believe we are now at a point where we need to discuss next steps. Moxie will definitely require lifelong medical care to include but not limited to anti seizure medicine, insulin and a special diet. Because our son Paulie is so attached to her we feel it is in his best interest to keep Moxie and that it would be extremely damaging to disrupt the bond that they've formed. So we request a lump sum financial assistance for Moxie's future care of $2500. Her medical bills for December alone were over $600. We would take full responsibility for Moxie's future care. Natalie

Rating: 5 stars  

2 people found this review helpful

I was searching the internet for a non-profit that would help my daughter get a service dog. She is 5 years old and has been diagnosed with autism. We feel like there is a lot of hope for our daughter, if only things would fall into place for her. She is non-verbal, but passionately speaks her own language. It's this passion and drive that we love in her! I found North Star's website and it stood out to me. Patty's ideas about service dog placements fascinated me because they are unique. We absolutely did not want a service dog that had been trained with convicts in a prison. We also did not want to wait 2-3 years for a placement. Precious time would have passed in our daughter's life. I contacted Patty and eventually she got back to me. I spoke to her for quite some time in a phone call and I really felt that she understood how badly we want to help our daughter. We were willing to do whatever it took to help her get a dog, but we couldn't do it on our own. Amazingly, we were able to to raise the $5,000 (our half of the cost) through very generous friends and coworkers. A couple months later, we met Buzz at the airport. Buzz is a gorgeous Labradoodle. He is incredibly sweet and well trained. At this point in our lives we do not own a home with a yard, so raising a puppy would have been very difficult. Buzz came with advanced training because he is 2 years old. Patty connected us to CaliPals, which is an organization that raises service dogs and trained pets. Patty has paid for everything she said she would and we have never felt neglected. Our daughter loves Buzz and calls him "Bunny." She changes her "z's" to "n's." Buzz has helped her make friends with a set of triplets. She has started talking more and is even making great strides in writing. He hasn't magically fixed her, but that's not what we expected. I think he makes her feel safe. He follows all of us around our home and likes to lay in our laps. He has made all of us so happy. He is like our second child. It's hard to have a bad day when we see Buzzy and our daughter playing quietly together. I think we made a very good choice to go through North Star. I would highly recommend working with Patty.

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

Provide Patty with more resources to make even more placements.

How would you describe the help you got from this organization?

Life-changing

How likely are you to recommend this organization to a friend?

Definitely

How do you feel you were treated by this organization?

Very Well

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2012

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Rating: 5 stars  

Working with Patty and Ron and North Star Foundation has been an incredible experience for our whole family. Our youngest son Matthew, who is now 12 years old, has aspergers and retinitis pigmentosa. He is legally blind and only has 15 degrees of central vision; no peripheral vision. We thought Matthew would really benefit from having a North Star dog. The main thing is that we needed a dog, who might get stepped on occasionally or tripped over, that wouldn't take it personally and would still love him and want to be around him to play. Well, we got Nellie from North Star Foundation in Februray of 2010. She is a calm, loving yellow lab that gives Matthew and our family all the love we need. And, we love her back. Nellie is the perfect addtion to our family!

How would you describe the help you got from this organization?

Life-changing

How likely are you to recommend this organization to a friend?

Definitely

How do you feel you were treated by this organization?

Very Well

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2010

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Rating: 5 stars  

North Star Foundation assisted us in acquiring a therapy dog for our son who has autism. They were very easy to work with and we have had a wonderful experience integrating a service dog into our home. The dog has assisted our son by decreasing stress and providing emotional support, but he also is learning to track and perform other tasks to assist our son.

How would you describe the help you got from this organization?

Life-changing

How likely are you to recommend this organization to a friend?

Definitely

How do you feel you were treated by this organization?

Very Well

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2012

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Rating: 5 stars  

North Star foundation changed my family's life!!! My son has autism and we received Bailey our therapy dog when my son was 8. She brought him back once when he wandered off and stopped him from wandering once too. Priceless! Along with the unconditional love she gives all of us, the peace of mind she creates in our home and her beautiful sole our lives have been forever blessed. Words can not express what Bailey means to us and how wonderful North Star Foundation is!!!

How would you describe the help you got from this organization?

Life-changing

How likely are you to recommend this organization to a friend?

Definitely

How do you feel you were treated by this organization?

Very Well

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2012

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Rating: 5 stars  

Our relationship with North Star began in 2008; it was a few months after our son was diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome (on the autism spectrum). Patty believed adding a North Star dog to our family would help our son with his social and emotional challenges. How right she was! We added Radar to our family and the changes started to happen. It was subtle at first. Some eye contact here, a brief word to strangers who approached us while out in public there. Then one day, without prompting, our son took the lead in speaking to strangers who approached. Despite me backing off a few yards away, he continued to speak to these ladies on his own for more than ten minutes. How far he's come! My initial goal with out North Star dog placement was for our son to "live in the moment"; to notice the world around him. This goal was met years ago and our placement has far exceeded our expectations. I have, on several occasions, recommended North Star to people for a variety of reasons. I keep a stack of North Star pamphlets at home and have distributed them when I've felt someone might benefit from their services.

How would you describe the help you got from this organization?

Life-changing

How likely are you to recommend this organization to a friend?

Definitely

How do you feel you were treated by this organization?

Very Well

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2012

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1 previous review
Rating: 5 stars  

We began our relationship with Patty and North Star in early 2008. As a Mom of a child with Asperger's, I hoped adding a North Star dog to our family would help our son see the world around him; to live in the moment. Having Radar join our family has done that and so much more! This placement has exceeded my expectations in so many ways. Just recently, not only did Jason (our son with AS) talk to strangers about what his dog provides for him but he continued to speak to the strangers despite me walking away. This was a huge step forward and not something that had ever happened. Having Radar there gives Jason a certain level of confidence. He knows people find his dog really cool and Jason doesn't miss an opportunity to educate the public! We have recently become even more involved with Patty and North Star by puppy-raising. It was a wonderful learning experience and a labor of love. Patty is always available to her families (both those who have received dogs and those raising puppies for other families) as a valuable resource and wealth of information. She personally answered my many questions without ever making feel inadequate. This work North Star is doing is so important. I only wish more rescources were available to them; they could help so many more families like ours!

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

YES!

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

Find a way to recruit more volunteers and find ways to raise more funds as this is everyone's biggest obstacle.

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Rating: 1 stars  

5 people found this review helpful

We originally posted a positive review of NorthStar within hours of receiving our puppy. Since then we have been consistently disappointed by NorthStar and Patty Dobbs-Gross. Let’s start at the beginning: after some emails and phone calls between our family and Patty, she offered us a dog for which “the adoption had just fallen through.” When we visited NorthStar in Storrs, CT, we were appalled by the conditions: the house was filthy, the kitchen where we first met the dog was not fit for human use, and a litter of puppies was penned into a makeshift plywood enclosure in the garage. We understood from Patty that her autism dogs were part of a special program intended to bring out “forgiveness,” which was managed reputable breeders. On the second visit, we left with the puppy, a used cage, some paperwork, and some brochures to share with other ASD families. We paid $5,000 for the dog over two installments—at first we were told the dog, vet care and training cost $10,000 and that we could get her help raising the other $5,000 from family and friends online, but somehow we got the bargain price of $5,000 for this dog that magically was available when we called.

As we settled into life with our autistic seven-year old and a new puppy, working with Patty became frustrating in the extreme. It took multiple calls, voicemails and emails to get her response to simple questions, or movement on promised training support. The dog’s paperwork consisted of a blurry fax of a litter report dated 4/20/2011 with some vaccine stickers taped to it. It was impossible to tell if this was in fact a report for our dog, or for someone else’s entirely. The only place our dog’s name appeared was on the fax coversheet, and even then her name was communicated as something different. The technician at our vet said she had never seen such shoddy paperwork, and as a result we had to repeat the full round of shots supposedly done by NorthStar. To top it all off, the NorthStar credit card that was supposedly on file with our local vet never materialized, and each time we went for checkups or shots or the very expensive spaying procedure, we were literally left with the bill. NorthStar’s lack of attention and follow-through cost us thousands more on top of the initial $5,000 for the dog. In short, our carefully bred super autism dog was actually of unknown pedigree with no useable paperwork or records and a non-responsive partner in the venture. This was not helping our autistic son, but instead causing us to divert our attention away from him to deal with Patty.

A few more annoyances and inconveniences: the first in-home trainer provided by Patty walked off the job with no warning after less than a month’s total training time. We had to pester Patty for weeks to get our dog signed up for good puppy classes, where we met another NorthStar family that had similar complaints. Patty at one point let slip that she bred the puppies herself, presumably in her garage. We repeatedly asked for breeder paperwork and have never received any. The last straw was when our dog was diagnosed with hip dysplasia at six months old. She will require a special diet, medication and more frequent vet visits for the rest of her life, and even more care when her hips start going for good.

Add the financial and time losses to the fact that the dog is supposed to help a child with autism. If you’re reading this, you probably have a child with ASD, and are familiar with the research about the positive effects of dogs on autistic kids. Take it from a family that has suffered through months of aggravation, half-truths and broken promises at NorthStar’s hands: go to a reputable breeder and get a good dog. Get to know the puppy lemon laws in your state, and if they apply to breeders (CT’s apply only to pet stores). In our opinion, NorthStar is fly-by-night at best, and outright fraudulent at worst. Patty Dobbs-Gross was paid $5,000 for a dog any reputable breeder wouldn’t sell for $500, and we got none of the support or training we agreed to in her contract. That contract also clearly states that no refunds will be provided if the relationship between the family and NorthStar ends prematurely. Caveat emptor!

Let this bad experience serve as a warning to anyone who flirts with this organization. Run as fast as you can from NorthStar and don’t look back.

How would you describe the help you got from this organization?

A little

How likely are you to recommend this organization to a friend?

No

How do you feel you were treated by this organization?

Badly

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2012

Was this review helpful? 

Christina, I have already corrected your many lies and misperceptions that you posted on Yelp, a site that took down your post as it was full of inaccuracies, but I will leave this post up here on my own site to serve as a document that is posted and responded to for the last time,for I just won't let you take up any more of my time with your personal vendetta... But first, here's something you got right: my kitchen was probably dirty the day you came to visit...it frequently is, at least according to the standards in my own Connecticut neighborhood and probably in your own Massachusetts neighborhood...it is never fun to be judged, naturally, but I want you to know that I could have a cleaner house if I didn't work seven days a week (unpaid) on developing this nonprofit concept for families of children with autism. And I want you to know that if I could have afforded a housekeeper the day you visited I would have done so in order to have you be more comfortable in my home the day I invited you there to see if an assistance dog might help you son Matthew with his autism. And you weren't lying, but ignorant, about the fact that I breed most of the North Star dogs we place. I didn't "let that slip" but brag about this as our breeding program is actually a huge strength for us at North Star, and I'm sorry I somehow failed to communicate this to you: Ruby's breeding is stellar, and she actually doesn't have hip dysplasia; for anyone reading your post and this reply, this is the "missing link" of information that will explain why you are so scathing in your review: you believe Ruby has hip dysplasia based on a Penn Hip you gave her at six months of age; I asked (and paid for) a second opinion, to have her given an OFA at Tufts when she was a year old and told you that I would have been prepared to pay for surgery had she been diagnosed as dysplastic there at Tufts, but as you well know, this isn't what happened...the vet at Tufts, Dr. Brenda Salinardi, said: "Ruby likely had some joint laxity which caused the clinical signs seen six months ago, but with age the join capsule tightens, which is likely responsible for much of the improvement noted." You didn't want to hear this, and began to slander me and North Star on the internet immediately after this report was issued, with information that you know to be lies. Your trainer left due to a death in her family, and I think you are being pretty rotten to leave this fact out, along with the fact that I got you a replacement trainer of very high quality within a month of your old trainer having to leave, and I prepaid her for your lessons; you were the ones to drag your feet here, and then finally rejected this paid for training without even meeting the trainer. Yet you complain you got "none of the support or training" agreed to in the contract? You know that is a lie, Christina, and I'm not really sure how you sleep at night with your penchant for telling lies in order to cast ugly stones when you are actually angry about something else (ie, Ruby's nonexistent hip dysplasia). You also withhold important truths here in addition to telling lies, such as the fact that Ruby has a fantastic disposition and is working well with your son, Matthew...in fact, here's what you wrote to me last summer when your son Matthew responded so well to her, and vice versa: "Here's another copy of the picture... unbelievable, eh? Was this the same kid who couldn't sit still at your dining room table? We are speechless!!!!!! You can view these photos in a full-screen screen slideshow and download full-resolution copies for free. Enjoy!" The second outright lie you tell is that I "sell" North Star dogs for $5,000...if this was so, Christina, that why on earth would I have been paying Ruby's vet and training bills this past year? The $5,000 you were asked to raise, half the true cost of the work we do on North Star placements, is both for training/insurance/transportation/taxes/equipment/food/toys & purchase price of the dog ($1,500, a rock bottom price for this clean of a pedigree and commitment to early work with the litter...you can see me working with Ruby and her siblings on this You-Tube page in my "dirty" kitchen: www.youtube.com/profile?user=northstarvids to prove the work I did with Ruby and her siblings). You call us a "fly by night" organization, but what does this say about your perceptions when I tell you we've been working to develop this nonprofit service for 15 years now and have over 150 successful placement in progress around the world to show for it?Does this sound like we're "flying by night"? In closing, I am going to let your meanspirited post serve as my reminder that you just can't please them all... Regards, Patty Dobbs Gross Executive Director North Star Foundation

Rating: 5 stars  

I cannot tell you how much Patty and the North Star Foundation has changed our lives for the better. There is nothing like a friendly, polite, well trained North Star dog to bring peace to a family with autism.

Our dog, Sam, has brought so much joy and hope to our family. Sam is so calm and caring and her demenor really brings a lot to our home. Her presence just completes our family in such a special way.

Please consider donating to North Star so that more children and families can be blessed as we have been.

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

by the inhancement of the quality of life of our family unit.

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

I honestly cannot think of any. Keep up the amazing work!

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Rating: 5 stars  

Our journey with North Star began in May 2010. Patty has been a real pleasure to work with. She has been so caring, thoughtful and helpful throughout the whole process. She selected the most amazing yellow lab, Rudy for our son, John who has PDD-NOS. Does Patty know how to pick those pups!!! Rudy is an amazing boy. He brings so much love and calmness to our family. I truly can say that we are a happier family now. Our son, John loves his dog so much. They adore each other. Rudy enjoys watching John play with his cars and trains and every now and them will try and join in the play! Since Rudy's arrival, John is talking so much more and loves to tell everyone that this is his dog Rudy. He wants to take Rudy everywhere with him. John looks forward to having his buddy watch him get on the bus and greet him with lots of kisses when he returns home from school.

I am always quick to tell people that North Star is a wonderful organization to work with. The trainers and puppy raisers are so nice and great to work with. I am proud to say that they were all very helpful in the training of our Rudy. He just passed his CGC and I could not have done it without there help and support.

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

Great people to work with and so helpful every step of the way.

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

No changes needed. They are a wonderful organization

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