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18 Reviews
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April 30, 2013
1 person found this review helpful

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April 30, 2013
1 person found this review helpful

That's why Rescue Groups will some time end the not so Humane Societys

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Will you volunteer or donate to this organization?

No

How much of an impact do you think this organization has?

Life-changing

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2012

December 20, 2012
2 people found this review helpful

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December 20, 2012
2 people found this review helpful

As a former volunteer I know for a fact they kill many health animals, or ones that might need more than the usual cost of just antibiotics...they use the city of Detroit as the reason for their high kill rate which has remained pretty much the same for years, I have tracked it on the Dept of Ag reports. As soon as you turn in your owned animal, they can kill it in a second if they need room. Strays have to be held 4 days, so if it's too crowded, the owned animals go first. They will always advertise a rescued animal at some point for the publicity, and if it's already gone public, that animal will likely be treated for whatever it needs to gain sympathy and donations. They DO do a lot of GOOD, but they are very convincing and manipulative with the public and what they very carefully say to the public, In 2013 you will need an appointment to turn in your owned animal. they already charge for it. Not sure what happens if you bring in a stray. the CEO gets about $20,000 raises each year in spite of the economy. check that info at Dept of Ag. They do NOT take in 100,000 animals a year as someone stated, it's more like 25 - 27,000 depending on the year I'm saying they have a lot of impact but not necessarily in a good way.

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Will you volunteer or donate to this organization?

No

How much of an impact do you think this organization has?

A lot

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2009

December 12, 2012
2 people found this review helpful

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December 12, 2012
2 people found this review helpful

MHS kills 7 out of 10 animals that enter their facility, year after year. Go view their reports on the Michigan Department of Agriculture website. The entire organization needs a sweep! They refused a COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT of their shelter, WHY? Now, you must make an appointment to surrender an animal...people will drop the poor animal on the side of the road, or worse! This is not the answer to improve their save rate! No transparency here! Four board members resigned in 2011 due to the HORRIFIC kill rate, excuse after excuse and their refusal to undergo a COMPREHENSIVE ASSESSMENT. LEADERSHIP MUST CHANGE TO SAVE THE ANIMALS! DEMAND a LEADERSHIP CHANGE!

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Would you volunteer for this group again?

No

For the time you spent, how much of an impact did you feel your work or activity had?

None

Did the organization use your time wisely?

Somewhat badly

Would you recommend this group to a friend?

No

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2011

October 2, 2012
3 people found this review helpful

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October 2, 2012
3 people found this review helpful

How terrible that so little improvement has been made! One year after losing four board members over its euthanasia rate, the Michigan Humane Society has hired people to evaluate shelter practices and has become more transparent, but its critics said little has changed with regard to saving animals' lives.A clarifying statement to donors identifies MHS as a stand-alone charity, rather than a statewide umbrella organization that funds other humane societies. But not all information is available.The Free Press requested copies of the full reports from the Cornell team and another consultant, as the summaries lack full findings. Last year, the Free Press requested multiple times to view animal records, to better understand euthanasia decisions. All requests were denied.But that statistic belies other numbers: From 2007-11, MHS reported to the state a euthanasia rate between 67% and 70% for dogs and cats, deeming those animals unhealthy and often taken for a fee. Another criticism of the organization is of fund-raising stories of sick and severely injured animals nursed back to health by MHS. The ads are misleading, the critics said, because donors believe such lifesaving measures are standard, even as the euthanasia numbers do not support that message. There's been no improvement."

Such criticisms were the basis of three charity fraud complaints filed in the last year against MHS with the Michigan attorney general, including one that referenced a similar case in Pennsylvania.Yet, MHS has designed its treatment protocol to transfer to other shelters and animal welfare groups those animals that it decides not to treat.Former board member Cheryl Phillips said MHS has the largest veterinary budget of any Michigan shelter, so to transfer animals rather than treat them is shifting the burden to those with fewer resources.

The Michigan Pet Fund Alliance said in a statement that the humane society's decision to disregard the intake recommendation is tantamount to animal cruelty.

"Why would MHS cling to this failed model?" the group asked in a statement. "If individuals or rescue groups were taking in more animals than they could care for, so much so that more than two-thirds of them ended up dead every year, wouldn't we call that animal cruelty?"

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How does this organization compare with others in the same sector?

Badly

How much of an impact do you think this organization has?

Some

Will you recommend this organization to others?

No

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2011

June 23, 2012
2 people found this review helpful

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June 23, 2012
2 people found this review helpful

Yes, MHS does bash others. In fact, it looks like MHS leadership is willing to pay to bash others. The full post is at: http://www.nathanwinograd.com/?p=6990 It was just a matter of time before someone got desperate enough and lacked the ethics to do it. And it looks like it is the Michigan Humane Society. Today, I was informed that the leadership of MHS attempted to hire a public relations firm in Michigan to engage in a full blown smear campaign against me. The Michigan Humane Society indicated that it was willing to pay for private investigators. At least one firm declined, stating that doing so was unethical. It may also be illegal, amounting to a misuse of donor funds and conspiracy to commit fraud. I’ve already hired an attorney, who is working on both a ‘cease and desist’ letter to the Michigan Humane Society Board, as well as asking the Attorney General of Michigan to open up an investigation. Donors are giving [them] money to save lives. Not to kill them. And certainly not to hire private investigators and public relations firms in order to engage in a smear campaign. This is a shame. What a terrible use of donor funds.

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Will you volunteer or donate to this organization?

No

How much of an impact do you think this organization has?

Some

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2012

June 17, 2012
3 people found this review helpful

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June 17, 2012
3 people found this review helpful

I do not understand why MHS has such a high rating when they kill 7 out of every 10 animals they take in - 9.6 pets EVERY HOUR as they themselves have reported to the Michigan Dept. of Agriculture. They are one of the 8 worst animal shelter in the state of Michigan. Please direct your donations to animal welfare groups who will use it to actually save adoptable and treatable dogs and cats, puppies and kittens. A question below asks if they are life-changing. They sure are for all the animal thery kill every day.

The Great!

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

my role as secretary of the Michigan Pet Fund Alliance.

Ways to make it better...

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

Replace the top three managers at once with ones committed to the No Kill principals and know how to put them into effect to save the lives of the adoptable animals that deserve a chance for a home, not a needle in their paws.

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Will you volunteer or donate to this organization?

No

How much of an impact do you think this organization has?

A lot

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2012

How did you learn about this organization?

I have pretty much always known of them but used to buy into their publicity. Now I know the real story and it is disgusting to any caring human.

June 13, 2012
1 person found this review helpful

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Review from CharityNavigator
June 13, 2012
1 person found this review helpful

Don't think people don't see the good things that go on at MHS either. Even those of us who question leadership and think the organization is headed in the wrong direction see the good. There is a lot of good going on there as well. We all know that. Once again, this is an issue of leadership and direction of the organization, and transparency.
There are a number of us who have tried to bring our issues to those at MHS who do have the authority to address our concerns. Each time we came forward with our issues, management has always been "unavailable" and board members generally don't respond. With no alternative left, a growing number of us are now speaking out about our concerns.
Asking legitimate questions and posting truthful information that gives insight into how MHS operates is not what I consider to be bashing or a personal vendetta.
Ultimately, MHS is the people's charity. The public has a right to know what goes on, how resources are used, and what oversight is in place. The public deserves to hear the truth. Period.
Speaking of the truth, the 2011 Individual Michigan Shelter Statistics are in from the Michigan Department of Agriculture:
Dogs and cats
25668 Received
17265 euthanized = 67.26% euth rate dogs and cats
8403 = 32.74% save rate dogs and cats.
Yet, on the MHS Website, it's stated that,
"MHS worked diligently to achieve its goal of 100% adoption for adoptable animals, which was reached two years ago and the organization is now working to attain that same goal for animals deemed to be as treatable."
So if MHS has achieved it's goal of a 100% adoption rate for adoptable animals, that means that MHS deemed all 17265 dogs and cats as not adoptable. It is incomprehensible that that number of animals are beyond redemption.
"Three things cannot be long hidden: the sun, the moon, and the truth."

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Would you volunteer for this group again?

Unlikely

For the time you spent, how much of an impact did you feel your work or activity had?

A little

Did the organization use your time wisely?

Okay

Would you recommend this group to a friend?

Unlikely

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2012

June 11, 2012
5 people found this review helpful

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Review from CharityNavigator
June 11, 2012
5 people found this review helpful

MHS does so much with so little, in large part due to their great volunteers, and they are able to help over 100,000 animals a year without turning anyone away because of cost or space. If people wanted to really help animals, they would simply take their arguments up with the individuals whom which they have issues and stop pasting duplicates of their personal vendettas on review boards meant for constructive feedback of an organization. MHS doesn't bash others, continuing to work with groups that dump their unwanted cases on MHS so they can keep up the appearance of being "no-kill," the philosophical tenets of which one finds that MHS closely follows if they know the definition of the term.

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Would you volunteer for this group again?

Definitely

For the time you spent, how much of an impact did you feel your work or activity had?

Life-changing

Did the organization use your time wisely?

Very Well

Would you recommend this group to a friend?

Definitely

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2012

June 10, 2012
1 person found this review helpful

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June 10, 2012
1 person found this review helpful

Someone mentioned in an earlier post about problems with transparency not being new to MHS.

They were not kidding.
Ex-HSUS VP Wills cops a plea



Hoyt then recommended Wills to the Michigan Humane Society, where he was executive director, 1979-1989. Wills resigned
from MHS when the board began inquiring into the disappearance of $1.6 million. A bookkeeper, Denise Hopkins, was eventually convicted of embezzling $56,000 of the missing sum. Wills next founded the National Society for Animal Protection, only to dissolve it when he joined HSUS.

Recovery from Misuse of Funds Takes Years


At MHS,
Been there, Done That.

South of Santa Cruz, on the far side of Monterey Bay, SPCA of Monterey County executive director Gary Tiscornia could testify from direct experience about the difficulties that the Santa Cruz SPCA, Sevierville Huame Society, LA/SPCA, et al can expect to meet ahead. Tiscornia headed the Michigan Humane Society for a decade after predecessor David Wills departed, leaving an unexplained deficit of $1.6 million.

Bookkeeper Denise Hopkins was successfully prosecuted for allegedly embezzling a small portion of it. Wills was successfully sued in 1994 for taking money under false pretenses at his next stop, the defunct National Society for Animal Protection, and was in 1997 convicted of embezzling from the Humane Society of the U.S., where he was vice president for investigations, 1991-1994.

Wills was never brought to account for any of the missing Michigan Humane money, however, and although Tiscornia was credited with impressively rebuilding the organization, the losses had a ripple effect evident even 10 years afterward, when Michigan Humane cut back a discount pet sterilization program because tight funding inhibited hiring enough veterinarians to keep it operating at all three of the MHS shelters.

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Will you volunteer or donate to this organization?

No

How much of an impact do you think this organization has?

Some

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2012

June 7, 2012
4 people found this review helpful

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June 7, 2012
4 people found this review helpful

I was working all day and came home that night to find my cat was having trouble breathing. I called the Westland clinic and told them of my findings, they were concerned and made a great effort to get her in right away at the last minute so she could be treated and start medications to start her on the road to recovery. The staff was very compassionate and the veterinarian even stayed past closing time to make sure I understood what was wrong with my cat, what the medicine was treating and what symptoms on which I should keep a close watch. These folks work so hard to care for the animals and provide great service to folks who have nowhere else to turn. People who complain about some of the Michigan Humane Society policies should try and get similar quality services from another organization in Michigan; I think they will find that no other nonprofit meets their high standards, if they can even get another group to help them!

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How would you describe the help you got from this organization?

Life-changing

How likely are you to recommend this organization to a friend?

Definitely

How do you feel you were treated by this organization?

Very Well

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2011

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help adopt cats from our offsite adoption centers; spend time photographing adoptable animals and posting on websites; present humane education to school children Volunteer