Oops! You must enter a search term greater than 3 characters.

Invite reviews

Invite friends and colleagues to share their experiences with this nonprofit
20 Reviews
1234.95
Previous | Next
Write A Review
December 8, 2012

more

December 8, 2012

I first learned of LCHPP, Inc. in 2007 or 2008 while we were building our house in Zirahuen. I was told that LCHPP provided trees for reforestation. Our property had many old neglected peach trees but not much in the way of native trees except for jaras. I wanted to plant trees in order to provide habitat for wildlife. Just up the hill is a federal ecological reserve, in which I have seen rare wildlife species, By reforesting part of our property we would be creating a wildlife corridor connecting the reserve to the baranca (stream/ wetland) down the hill. Usually the trees from LCHPP are given to Mexicans to plant for future harvesting so that they aren't tempted to harvest trees from areas where the monarchs winter. We, on the other hand, are foreigners living in Mexico part of each year and have no intention of ever harvesting the trees. When they get old, they will provide homes for woodpeckers, owls and other wildlife. We planted 450 seedlings from LCHPP, consisting of 3 different kinds of oaks, 3 different kinds of cedars, 3 different kinds of pines and a few oyamils. The first 3 years we hauled bucket after bucket to keep them watered. I fed them with compost I made from manure, soil, leaves, grass, yeast, bran and sugar. Now, a few years later, some of the trees are more than 12 feet tall Several had nests in them. I have counted 27 species of birds in the area. A great biodiversity of plants, along with accompanying insects, has cropped up around the trees. This summer I planted 50 more trees. I also planted 50 trees with some students in Nocutzepo where I ran an after-school program to teach children about Nature. We discussed the benefits of trees to humans and the animals and other plants that depend on them. We drew and painted pictures of leaves and plants in watercolor. I have seen the monarchs at their wintering grounds in El Rosario. It is an amazing, mind-boggling event which could not happen without the trees providing shelter. I am working on paintings of monarchs on flowers to educate the public about them. I am planning a botanical art workshop in El Rosario to bring artists there to record the process.

More feedback...

Will you volunteer or donate to this organization beyond what is required of board members?

Definitely

How much of an impact do you think this organization has?

Life-changing

Will you tell others about this organization?

Definitely

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2012

October 20, 2012

more


1 previous review
March 31, 2011

I was fortunate to become involved with this reforestation and forest restoration program in its first year - in 1997, when I was looking for a sabbatical project to work on in Mexico. In the beginni... more

October 20, 2012

I have first-hand experience about the ways in which the La Cruz Habitat Protection Project and its Forests for Monarchs Program are helping to restore the forests and watersheds of South-Central Mexico and improve the lives of the poor rural people who live in the project areas. I have met and been thanked by many of the local participants who plant our trees on their land, during more than nine years when I worked as a forester and conservation worker on this program. I have personally seen the soils and watersheds become improved, and seen locations where even mountain springs that had dried up on degraded lands have begun to flow again. Any positive impact we can have on these degraded forest areas is important for so many reasons. For example, it is not only indigenous people who have no developed water supply systems who depend on the mountain springs, it is also the overwintering monarch butterflies who must come out of their sanctuary roosts daily to drink from the springs. Of course, other wildlife and plants also benefit from the watershed restoration we are contributing to. Another outcome that is a testament to the success of this program is that the local people who started planting our trees back in 1998 are beginning to reap real economic benefits. These are benefits that they deserve for deciding to dedicate their lands and their labors to reforestation. These forward thinking people have planted trees to benefit their own lands and families, but by doing so they are also contributing to the conservation of remnant native forests by establishing alternative forests for human uses, which is the conservation strategy of the LCHPP organization. Contributors should know that the vast majority of this non-profit's funds go directly to producing and transporting trees to give away to the local land owners, as well as to document the plantings, provide technical assistance, and monitor tree survival. We do not pay the locals to plant the trees; they put a lot of their own resources into this. Most trees are given to indigenous communities and ejidos who plant on communal lands. If you talked to the local people they would ask you to support this program.

More feedback...

Will you volunteer or donate to this organization beyond what is required of board members?

Definitely

How much of an impact do you think this organization has?

Life-changing

Will you tell others about this organization?

Definitely

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2012

March 31, 2011

I was fortunate to become involved with this reforestation and forest restoration program in its first year - in 1997, when I was looking for a sabbatical project to work on in Mexico. In the beginning, we were a small organization doing small things. Fourteen years later, we are still a small organization, but now we are doing more – sprouting our way towards planting a million trees a year where they are badly needed: in the impoverished and degraded watersheds of south-central Mexico. It is gratifying to be able to stand on a lookout in some of our project areas and look around and see the mountainside greening up with woodlots that we helped get planted years ago. It is also gratifying to have been able to work with such dedicated, forward-thinking people as are the ones who make this program function, the local folk who ask us to help them reforest their lands, and those who support our work.

The Great!

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

I have personally seen and have documented the results that this organization has accomplished in terms of restoring forests to the mountainsides of the monarch butterfly overwintering zones of Mexico - and in the watersheds of Lake Patzcuaro and Lake Zirahuen. Likewise, I have personally spoken to the local participants and have received their expressions of heartfelt gratitude for helping give them "something productive to do with their land", which was no longer any good for farming.

Ways to make it better...

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

Provide it with a stable source of ongoing funding.

April 7, 2012

more

Review from Guidestar
April 7, 2012

La Cruz Habitat Protection Project (LCHPP), working as 'Forests for Monarchs,' was able to plant an additional 600,000 trees in Central Mexico last summer (2011). And, despite a difficult economic climate and increased challenges to fundraising, LCHPP has committed to planting an additional 600,000 trees during the summer of 2012. I am proud to play a role in making a positive impact on the overwintering environment for millions of monarch butterflies; helping to improve the climate and economic stability for the local people who share these mountains with the monarchs; and yes, in improving the global climate, as well. We at LCHPP owe our successes and stability to those who support our work with financial contributions. Many thanks to all those who make our work possible.

More feedback...

Will you volunteer or donate to this organization beyond what is required of board members?

Definitely

How much of an impact do you think this organization has?

Life-changing

Will you tell others about this organization?

Definitely

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2012

March 26, 2012

more


1 previous review
March 23, 2011

I have been raising, releasing and tagging monarchs since 1972 and in ’77 went in search of their winter hideaway in Mexico, which I found after a two month search. The next couple of years I had ... more

March 26, 2012

I am proud to be part of this organization that planted 600,000 more trees in 2011, bringing the cumulative total to close to six million trees in Central Mexico over the last 15 years. These trees protect the monarch butterflies overwintering habitats, help the indigenous people and benefit the environment, locally and globally. I am also proud that this year LCHPP added a new project: Forests for Haiti. Jose Luis Alvarez, the head of LCHPP- Mexico and Javier Hinojosa, a respected Mexican forester, went to Haiti to help a poor community, Bois Neuf, start a tree nursery. They worked in collaboration with The Haitian People's Support Project. They have just returned from a follow up visit 7 months later. The nursery has already planted many of the 200,000 various seedlings they started, including fruit, nut and medicinal trees in addition to ones to provide cooking fuel and others to protect the soil and water. There are always many challenges, but progress is being made and people's lives are being positively impacted, the whole community is involved and that is wonderful. We hope to raise enough funds to help establish another nursery in another community in Haiti. Of course, our work in Mexico is needed now more than ever and we need to continue to plant more trees there as well.

More feedback...

Will you volunteer or donate to this organization beyond what is required of board members?

Definitely

How much of an impact do you think this organization has?

Life-changing

Will you tell others about this organization?

Definitely

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2012

March 23, 2011

I have been raising, releasing and tagging monarchs since 1972 and in ’77 went in search of their winter hideaway in Mexico, which I found after a two month search. The next couple of years I had the great honor to camp out for weeks at a time among millions upon millions of monarchs. While there in 1979, deforestation was beginning to be a problem and has only accelerated at a rapid pace since then, threatening the monarchs, the habitat that protects them and the well being of the local impoverished people.

Having returned to Mexico almost every year since then, and vowing to do something to honor, respect and protect these sacred mountains and their inhabitants, I searched for solutions to the seemingly intractable cycle of poverty and environmental degradation.

It took many years before I found Jose Luis Alvarez and La Cruz Habitat Protection Project. He and his organization were carrying out my longstanding dream. Here was a sustainable reforestation program that was intelligently and successfully restoring forests in and around the monarchs over wintering habitats in Mexico while addressing the needs of the local impoverished people.

After visiting the nursery and the reforested sites, I became an avid supporter in 1999. LCHPP’s Forests for Monarchs project has grown over the years from a modest beginning in 1997 when it convinced 4 families to plant 7,000 trees, to the summer of 2010’s planting of 673,000 trees, bringing the cumulative to total to over 5 million trees, always at the low cost of 50 cents a tree.

This is an innovative and effective program that is much needed and deserves all our support, for the health of the monarchs and for the health of our planet. I am proud to have become a member of the Board of Directors.

The Great!

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

I have seen the ingenious improvements at the LCHPP nursery and have visited the reforested sites and met the families who have planted LCHPP's trees. I've witnessed the positive impact this program has had on the environment and for the people.

Ways to make it better...

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

I think this organization does a great job and would like to see both its reforestation and educational programs expand, grow and be duplicated.

March 23, 2011

more

March 23, 2011

I am a botanist who has traveled all over Mexico studying Tillandsia, an epiphytic Bromeliad. My career grew out of my love for nature, and of Mexico which I began exploring by car in 1968. I first visited Michoacan in 1970, but it wasn’t until 1990 when I moved to Michoacan that I first visited the Monarch’s overwintering sites and was shocked by the bare fields that had crept across the mountainsides below the Monarch sanctuaries. It seemed that what had once been temperate forest was soon to become a desert.
Later that year I bought a piece of rural land on a mountainside overlooking Lake Patzcuaro. It was covered in what at that time was a 25 year-old re-growth forest of mixed pine, oak and madrone. During the eight years I lived there, I began to wonder if my piece of forest would soon be the only patch of forest on the mountainside. Logging trucks constantly hauled freshly cut pines from above my land to a saw mill below. That is when I began wishing for a way to help reforest fields to restore habitat for birds and the other plants that along with trees form beautiful rich communities. It was also heart breaking to watch the top soil wash into the shrinking lake during each summer rain.
In 1998, when I was preparing my move back to the US, Ed Rashin came from Santa Clara del Cobre to look at my property. As we walked the trails, showing him my land, we discussed the devastating effect that deforestation was having on the highlands of Michoacan from the Lakes to the Monarchs. He told me about a new project that was beginning to reforest in the Monarch area. When I left Mexico a few months later, I lost all contact with Ed. On my frequent trips back to Michoacan, I tried to find the project. In 2003, I finally reconnected with Ed. I soon met Jose Luis Alvarez and Maraleen Manos Jones, who was visiting Mexico from New York and began working to raise funds and awareness to help grow the project.

The Great!

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

To learn about the project, I have gone out with Jose Luis Alvarez to deliver trees to communities in the Monarch Area and in the Lakes Area and with Ed Rashin, Jose Luis Alvarez and Javier Hinojosa to monitor the tree planting. As an occasional part-time resident of Michoacan, I participate in as many on the ground activities as practical. Mainly, I oversee administration of the project, write grant proposals and reports, and put my experience and energies toward project growth and stability.

Ways to make it better...

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

I would like to see a guaranteed funding resource that would allow the project to grow steadily and securely.

March 23, 2011

more

March 23, 2011

La Cruz Habitat Protection Project doesn't just help local people plant trees to provide monarch butterfly habitat, it helps them plant hope for a stable economic future for the people of Michaocan, Mexcio by helping them grow wood for their use, prevent soil erosion that endangers their water sources, and improve their air quality.
By joining in the tree planting, I personally witnessed the evidence of this group changing people's behaviors and attitudes about their enviornment and their local economy.

The Great!

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

changing people's attitudes about new ways to both protect the environment and provide a stable, sustainble economy.

Ways to make it better...

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

help them have sufficient funds to grow and distribute one million tree per year to the local people.

Previous | Next
Write A Review

Filter by reviewer role:

Support This Nonprofit

Help this nonprofit get more reviews

5 tips for getting reviews

5 tips for getting reviews...

  1. Sending an email to clients, volunteers, donors, board members, and other partners with a link to your profile page.
  2. Putting a link on your Web site
  3. Including a link in your email newsletter
  4. Putting a link in the signature of your email
    Putting a link on your facebook page and status updates
  5. Tweeting out a link to your twitter followers