Oops! You must enter a search term greater than 3 characters.

Invite reviews

Invite friends and colleagues to share their experiences with this nonprofit
84 Reviews
1234.916675
Previous | 1 2 |
Write A Review
November 2, 2009

more

November 2, 2009

It's the best way possible to make interesting new friends with an interest in Judaism. It's a REAL asset to our community.

The Great!

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

Denver, Colorado

Ways to make it better...

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

It's serving a marvelous purpose doing what it does.

More feedback...

What I've enjoyed the most about my experience with this nonprofit is...

It's something you can attend on the spur of the moment.

The kinds of staff and volunteers that I met were...

Everyone has always been friendly and welcoming.

If this organization had 10 million bucks, it could...

Expand to other communities and become national.

Ways to make it better...

Experiences have always been lovely.

In my opinion, the biggest challenges facing this organization are...

Probably funding -- like everything else these days.

One thing I'd also say is that...

I like the fact that there is no edifice to maintain and we meet in various interesting places.

How frequently have you been involved with the organization?

About every six months

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2009

November 1, 2009

more

November 1, 2009

This organization provides a wonderful, spiritual, and meaningful experience every time I have attended. The High Holiday services, the stargazing and menorah-gazing at Chanukah, the folk dancing at the Shabbats at the park, the Challah baking--- all are not offered anywhere else.

The Great!

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

services and shabbats

Ways to make it better...

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

make smaller Chavurahs so closer geographical groups could meet more often

More feedback...

What I've enjoyed the most about my experience with this nonprofit is...

the rabbi's philosophies and the warmth of the group members

The kinds of staff and volunteers that I met were...

warm, helpful, friendly.

If this organization had 10 million bucks, it could...

have its own building!

Ways to make it better...

More events per month

In my opinion, the biggest challenges facing this organization are...

lack of income?

How frequently have you been involved with the organization?

About every month

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2009

October 31, 2009

more

October 31, 2009

JYW is a wonderful place were learning is easy and fun by dipping into a Spiritual type pot luck were everyone is giving and receiving in the form of Jewish enlightenment. Rabbi Field,in his class groups hands out litatue in the form of written passages and we all take turns reading, sharing what needs to be discussed. Anyone who attends will be taken with the way this man leads his Flock…You will believe if you attend.

The Great!

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

Jewish enlightenmet

More feedback...

What I've enjoyed the most about my experience with this nonprofit is...

and the way Rabbi field makes anyone feel comfortable and welcome even non afilates..

The kinds of staff and volunteers that I met were...

just as helpful and caring as Rabbi Field.

If this organization had 10 million bucks, it could...

Change the world..

How frequently have you been involved with the organization?

About every month

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2009

October 30, 2009

more

October 30, 2009

My most recent experience with JYW was at the High Holy Days services. While I hesitated about going to the campus at DU, rather than the beautiful Hudson Gardens where the service were held last year, I realized it wasn't the surroundings that made it special, it was the way Rabbi Field (and staff) presented the experience. My husband and I are very grateful for JYW as it gives a place to join others in celebrating Judaism. We are both at a time in our lives that we don't need what a traditional synagogue offers. Our appreciation goes out to JYW for being there. We look forward to attending the Bat Mitzvah of our dear friend's daughter next year...but will be participating in other services prior to that with Rabbi Field.

More feedback...

The kinds of staff and volunteers that I met were...

Very welcoming.

If this organization had 10 million bucks, it could...

Open a mikva, have a building of its own, provide more services, share its message.

How frequently have you been involved with the organization?

About every six months

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2009

October 29, 2009

more

October 29, 2009

This is a venue which to ,both my husband and I, is a way to get in touch with our spirituality in a more meaningfull way. Our most recent experience at the High Holy days with the rabbi and those who helped act out the Torah portion, we thought, was an excellent way to bring Torah into a more relavant light---so one could actually relate to it (great for the young people). The use of music (both solo and group singing) pulls us together in our prayer. And, I for one, find the music soulfood!

The Great!

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

various events, including a concert, Succoth at the Rabbis home, services at Hudson Gardens (absotlutely beautiful setting for the High Holiday services)

Ways to make it better...

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

More feedback...

What I've enjoyed the most about my experience with this nonprofit is...

the warmth and friendliness of all who attend

The kinds of staff and volunteers that I met were...

friendly and helpful.

If this organization had 10 million bucks, it could...

certainly advertise and let their existence be known....also, perhaps, hold Jewish music concerts (with Jewish dancing being taught)

Ways to make it better...

there were a few more ocassions to participate and attend. Unfortunately some of this , is due to the fact that we are not in Denver during the winter months.

In my opinion, the biggest challenges facing this organization are...

letting the Denver metro community be aware of their existence.

How frequently have you been involved with the organization?

About every six months

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2009

October 29, 2009

more

October 29, 2009

I was visiting my daughter in Denver last September. She does not belong to a temple but had heard of Judaism Your Way. My husband, daughter and her family and I went to Judaism Your Way for the High Holidays and were made to feel very welcome. At that time my grand daughter decided to join a new girls group that Rabbi Brian spoke of and has attended and loved the first meeting. She is also now doing her Bat Mitzvah with Rabbi Brian and my daughter is getting involved also. I look forward to my next visit to Denver and also to Judaism Your Way.

The Great!

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

Services

Ways to make it better...

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

More feedback...

What I've enjoyed the most about my experience with this nonprofit is...

I liked how much Rabbi Brian enjoys sharing his religion and how he connects with everyone. Also, the staff seem to really like what they do and and are so warm and helpful.

The kinds of staff and volunteers that I met were...

great

If this organization had 10 million bucks, it could...

have their own building and continue to help those in need.

Ways to make it better...

The music could be a little livelier, more joy (like I remember it being) less folk singing.

In my opinion, the biggest challenges facing this organization are...

the need for permanent space

How frequently have you been involved with the organization?

One time

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2009

October 29, 2009

more

October 29, 2009

I am an active member of two synagogues in the Denver area and support both with my volunteer time and financially. I've been lucky enough to have attended several JYW events every year for the past four years and each time, I find it a deeply nourishing, Jewishly grounded experience. JYW is one of my Jewish homes. I have come to depend on JYWs perspective, I learn things there that I don't experience elsewhere, and I continue to remain just as active in my other Jewish commitments. I consider myself Jewishly well-educated and very comfortable and relaxed in my Jewish identity. I wish I could say I'm personally more comfortable with intermarriage, but I struggle with this reality.  I can really understand the Jewish leaders who throw up their hands in despair about intermarriage because, as liberal and "welcoming" as I am and try to be, on the inside I have often felt much grief that the Jewish people can seem like it is melting away. So I deeply understand the instinct to say "no" and close the door.   But I resent the fear-mongering that goes on in our community as it whips up a lot of feelings but doesn't get us closer to a flexible set of responses that deal with the reality of changing Jewish lives. Many of us, even if we are Jews in committed relationships with Jews like I am, have multiple affiliations and have more complex identities than did our parents. I want a Jewish community that knows how to journey with me, not just to wave good bye if I or my relatives or friends have lives that happen to resemble a braided candle.  Like many of the understandably scared Jewish leaders, I was raised to feel that non-Jews could never be allies to me or my community's vitality, that they represented the end of things, never the beginnings, that their eagerness to learn about Judaism, or to support me was somehow suspect or hollow.  Our outreach programs to interfaith families have also been on the hollow side. There still remains a huge chasm, a persistent sense of a "we" and a "they" - in and out of synagogue life.  I think some outreach programs have been effective but many have lacked a deeper, more confident infrastructure such as what Rabbi Field provides.  Rabbi Field has developed an extremely well thought-out framework for reminding people like me that Judaism has always taken in and used "outside" influences to grow and to refine our culture's responses to the divine, to the larger community, to each other.  What a thought to consider - that perhaps we are not chronically faced with dilution (annihilation) all the time but have opportunities to expand and grow while standing firmly on Jewish ground.  Rabbi Field is demonstrating how Judaism can be the "host," that we can reckon with the inevitable demographic changes - trends which are bigger than all of us - through deep engagement. He's showing that closing the door just won't work for the short or long-term health and vitality of our community. I watch Rabbi Field assume that many non-Jews with great integrity want to know how to stand with and stand up for their family members and our community as it morphs into the next form. As foreign as it is to my upbringing, I have begun to understand Rabbi Field's belief that many people want to be allies to our community and can be counted on to be effective, to be aware of the complexities and richness of the Jewish journey. They can be enlisted to support their spouses, friends and children who hunger for Jewish connections and knowledge even if they have no idea how or where to get it.  25 years ago a wonderful rabbi shut the door -- "nicely" -- in my brother's and his non-Jewish fiancee's face, and my brother hardly ever showed up in any form of Jewish life again. The fallout from this all-too-common experience continues - his two twenty-something children are smart, alive people but on the Jewish front they are confused - I can see that they have all the Jewish worries without any of the goodies.  Had this family been supported by a JYW I believe these young people would have a much more clear understanding of their legacy and be able to feel entitled to belong -that they have a claim on Judaism, that we need them - even if they did not have two Jewish parents but only one. If they saw their father as a legitimate, fully supported member of the community, whose Jewish contributions were sought and valued even if his life partner wasn't Jewish, how different their identity journey might have been.  Instead I think they see their father as having been pushed out for making a choice (when he was only 25!) that sealed his and their fates as forever "questionable" Jews.  I can deeply understand rabbis seeing themselves as the ones who must set boundaries, the ones who must ask people to make tough choices, etc. I believe that Rabbi Field's way of doing this same work - of maintaining the Jewish people's health -- is to say yes and to say it from a position of strength. He is not guarding the goodies for the "committed-enough" (by whose definition?), so much as inviting people to understand the goodies, to partake, to share them with others.  I think Rabbi Field certainly understands the more guarded worldview, but he does not want it to prevail, or to substitute for differently responsive leadership.  Rabbi Field positions Judaism as a strong host for a changing Jewish community while at the same time deepening and expanding Jewish expression in exciting ways. Some examples that come to mind include (1) JYW’s new Open Tent Bnai Mitzvah program which supports four different ways for young people to Jewishly celebrate their coming of age, (2) their embrace of cutting edge expressions of Jewish spirituality such as Storahtelling, and (3) their Tu b’Av Jewish Festival of Love - where my partner and I got to explore relationship dynamics from a Jewish spiritual perspective, hear Jewish love stories for grown-ups, and watch couple after couple renew their vows under the huppah. I wish Rabbi Field and JYW continued recognition for the important contribution they are making to Denver's Jewish community. Denver can be proud to be the incubator for a program and an approach which many of us feel should be getting national attention. 

The Great!

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

noticing how my "hopeless" feelings about intermarriage are being transformed into hope, excitement and curiosity

Ways to make it better...

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

get more staff so they can do more, even be in two or more places at the same time.

More feedback...

What I've enjoyed the most about my experience with this nonprofit is...

the enormous Jewish spiritual and cultural creativity that this small organization is able to generate and support.

The kinds of staff and volunteers that I met were...

uniformly warm, gracious, helpful, thoughtful and insightful.

If this organization had 10 million bucks, it could...

have a more immediately powerful impact on Jewish fears about assimilation

Ways to make it better...

I got to meet and hear from more board members at the events.

In my opinion, the biggest challenges facing this organization are...

staff size and budgetary limitations.

One thing I'd also say is that...

JYW is doing transformative and essential work on behalf of the Jewish people. Jewish communities around the country can learn from them. I hope they get the opportunity to share their work.

How frequently have you been involved with the organization?

About every month

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2009

October 29, 2009

more

October 29, 2009

Judaism Your Way, under the leadership of Rabbi Brian Field, has given an opportunity to so many who have felt disenfranchised in trying to be part of the Jewish community. Rabbi Brian has indeed been creative, imaginative, and understanding in making each individual or family comfortable and relevant in their approach to Judaism. This organization has had a great beneficial effect in the Jewish community in their outreach approach.I really enjoyed the Tu b'Av Jewish Festival of love! Keep up the good work!

More feedback...

The kinds of staff and volunteers that I met were...

Very cooperative and very friendly and helpful

If this organization had 10 million bucks, it could...

continue its good work to reach out to those who are still looking for their approach to Judaism

How frequently have you been involved with the organization?

One time

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2008

October 29, 2009

more

October 29, 2009

I am so fortunate to live in Denver Colorado with such an innovative Jewish Congregation to fill the needs of unaffiliated Jews in my city. I have tried to find a congregation in Denver, wandering from Reformed, Reconstructionist, and Conservative Synagogues with no personal connection to any of them. Rabbi Field and the Board have created a place that meets my needs on many spiritual levels. My relationship with Judaism Your Way has stimulated my interest in making a more profound and consistent spiritual connection to my Jewish roots and beliefs. In addition, Rabbi Field also was able to perform my Uncle's funeral service. My Uncle was unaffiliated with a Synagogue at the time of his death, and found his relationship to many of the Jewish Religious Institutions frustrating. He would have liked Rabbi Field, who stepped in and performed a wonderful and touching service for my mourning family. Friends of mine tease me about the name and question the simplicity of using a name that says it all. Judaism your way truly meets people where they are, wherever they are, on their spiritual path.

More feedback...

What I've enjoyed the most about my experience with this nonprofit is...

that it has connected to me back to my Jewish Heritage and beliefs. At one point, my beliefs in Judaism were waning and I almost walked away from my Jewish spirituality completely. I am now interested in weekly Torah study and its importance to me.

The kinds of staff and volunteers that I met were...

truly gifted in their ability to connect with everyone who entered the building and service. They created an excitement about the event that I would not have anticipated at any other service.

How frequently have you been involved with the organization?

About every six months

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2009

October 29, 2009

more

October 29, 2009

I felt included when I began attending Judaism Your Way, previously I had never felt this way. My husband is not Jewish and I did not feel he was accepted at other Temples we attended. Being accepted is a huge factor for me. The services maintain tradition, while trying to explain the traditions many of us may not understand. The positive approach to explaining the scriptures is also soothing, rather than guilt ridden.

The Great!

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

By attending very meaningful Holiday services.

More feedback...

How frequently have you been involved with the organization?

One time

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2009

Previous | 1 2 |
Write A Review

Filter by reviewer role:

Support This Nonprofit

Help this nonprofit get more reviews

5 tips for getting reviews

5 tips for getting reviews...

  1. Sending an email to clients, volunteers, donors, board members, and other partners with a link to your profile page.
  2. Putting a link on your Web site
  3. Including a link in your email newsletter
  4. Putting a link in the signature of your email
    Putting a link on your facebook page and status updates
  5. Tweeting out a link to your twitter followers