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Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Human Services

Mission: Invisible Children exists to bring a permanent end to LRA atrocities. The mission is supported by our program areas - Media, Mobilization, Protection and Recovery.

Results: 81.48% of our revenue went to our programs in FY 2012

Geographic areas served: Worldwide

Programs: ETHOS We believe in the equal and inherent value of all human life. We believe that a worldview bound by borders is outdated and that stopping injustice anywhere is the responsibility of humanity everywhere. CONTEXT Joseph Kony and the Lord’s Resistance Army have been abducting, killing, and displacing civilians in East and central Africa since 1987. We first encountered these atrocities in northern Uganda in 2003 when we met a boy named Jacob who feared for his life and a woman named Jolly who had a vision for a better future. Together, we promised Jacob that we would do whatever we could to stop Joseph Kony and the LRA. Invisible Children was founded in 2004 to fulfill that promise. MODEL Invisible Children focuses exclusively on the LRA conflict through an integrated four-part model that addresses the problem in its entirety: immediate needs and long-term effects. MEDIA We create films to document LRA atrocities, introduce new audiences to the conflict, and inspire global action. MOBILIZATION We mobilize massive groups of people to support and advance international efforts to end LRA atrocities. PROTECTION We work with regional partners to build and expand systems that warn remote communities of LRA attacks and encourage members of the LRA to peacefully surrender. RECOVERY We work to rehabilitate children directly affected by the LRA and invest in education and economic recovery programs in the post-conflict region to promote lasting peace.

Community Stories

73 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

1 WestPhifer

General Member of the Public

Rating: 2

Following my first time viewing Invisible Children’s popular YouTube video "Kony 2012" I, like many, was emotionally moved. I made no initial action however to support IC, but instead critiqued both positive and negative aspects of this organization and their mission. Undoubtedly, IC has an admirable goal with the intention of saving thousands of lives from the Central African region. But, after watching the mission progress, I now find the emotional appeal of Invisible Children is no longer effective. The mission of Kony 2012 has surely been to raise awareness of Joseph Kony and the LRA from the beginning, but IC now overlooks the poor and broken people of third-world nations that were displayed so explicitly in "Kony 2012". IC has wasted valuable resources such as money and technology that should go to whom the company is named after: Invisible “Children”. This organization needs to be about the children.

2

General Member of the Public

Rating: 2

Personally, I wouldn’t become involved/donate to Invisible Children. Research shows that they are a charity group that not only struggles with completely supporting the cause financially, but they also don’t clearly state the ways in which they intend to help the problem in Uganda other than throwing money at the problem. That to me is the main problem that this organization has, which no clear objective. I feel uneasy not knowing precisely where my money is going and how it is going to be used. Would definitely not recommend Invisible Children as a quality organization to commit to.

General Member of the Public

Rating: 4

My first experience with Invisible Children was coming across the Kony 2012 video on Facebook. I watched it and my heart was torn for the children of Uganda, so I decided to research this organization a bit more. Shockingly, I was confronted with many controversies about the leaders, mission and finances of IC. I spent the next few months dissecting and researching to discover whether there were truths in those claims about IC. When it comes to finances, I found a chart with the breakdown of their budget on their website and saw that 80% of their budget goes towards their programs, leaving under 20% for the fundraising and administrative costs. I continued to learn that a multitude of the other claims were just due to false rumors and were not true. I am now seriously considering supporting this organization and fully believe it deserves your support as well.

Review from CharityNavigator

1

General Member of the Public

Rating: 2

When I first saw the film Kony 2012, I was inspired to act to save the people who were being affected by Joseph Kony. I’ve been to Africa and I’ve seen how the people of Africa live, so it’s a priority for me to help those people. While at first I was excited about what Invisible Children (IC) was doing. I decided to research the organization to make sure they were worthy of my monetary and moral support. My conclusion after researching is, first of all; IC has questionable and unorganized finances according to their website. Not only that, but through the showing of Kony 2012, IC manipulates the facts they present, which causes them to be perceived as untrustworthy. Organization and evidence is essential for NPO’s, and unfortunately Invisible Children has neither. In conclusion, although I fully agree that the people of Africa should have a better life; after my research, it is my opinion that Invisible Children is an unworthy organization to support.

Review from CharityNavigator

General Member of the Public

Rating: 3

Invisible Children’s goals are noble when it comes to helping children in another country. There will always be an organization that is not perfect or that will be criticized by the public. The problem is that Joseph Kony is no longer in Uganda. Jason Russell even confirmed it in Kony 2012 video. It may seem like a wasteful effort chasing someone who is no longer there, but as long as everyone remember that there is a criminal on the loose then one of I.C.’s goals have been met. Kony maybe out of Uganda, but one of the important things is to remember that he is still out there. This organization is doing well on getting everyone to remember that Kony still lives. This is an organization despite their flaws in some areas that deserves some support and attention. They got my support.

Review from CharityNavigator

JorgeLMachado

General Member of the Public

Rating: 4

When I was in high school, four members from Invisible Children came to talk about the pressing issue in Uganda regarding the exploitation of children at the hands of Kony and the LRA. I was skeptical at first because this organization was fairly new and concerns were raised pertaining to how effective this organization is with their finances. However, after doing personal research about this organization, I found that their cause is honorable and that they should be given a chance because they are willing to take action and make a permanent difference for these children. No child should have to suffer or ever be ignored when they are being exploited and robbed of their dignity which is why I support this organization.

Review from CharityNavigator

Sarah107

General Member of the Public

Rating: 2

Like most people, after watching the Kony 2012 video for the first time, it left me with a sense of compassion and a desire to take action. However, after doing a more thorough research on this NPO and it's ways of going about and solving Uganda's problem with Kony and the LRA, it would not be the best organization to invest time and money on. Where does all the money go? According to the Invisible Children's website, based on the 2011 financial statements, 80.6% went towards the programs, 16.2% to administrative, and 3.2% to fundraising. Personally, even based on this alone, I wouldn't donate to IC. Nonetheless, it is ultimately your decision if this organization is worth supporting.

Review from CharityNavigator

William25

General Member of the Public

Rating: 3

Invisible Children is an organization for a good cause. They may have some flaws, but the organization as a whole has good motives. I am sure that Invisible Children wants to have a positive relationship with the general public, and is doing all they can do within their power to make everyone happy. However, the truth of the matter is that Invisible Children is a charity organization, and they cannot live up to that standard.
One of the many questions that you may have for Invisible Children staff is, “where is my money going?” In 2011 Invisible Children spent 80.64% on media, mobilization, protection, and recovery programs; 16.24% on administration and management costs; and 3.22% on direct fundraising. If you have further questions please feel free to visit the Invisible Children website and click on the questions and answers page. I believe Invisible Children is an organization worth supporting.

General Member of the Public

Rating: 4

When I first saw the video Kony 2012, I did not like the organization and what it stood for because I was evaluating the movie and not the organization itself. As I researched the organization in depth my opinion of the motives of the organization changed. I looked at the bigger picture which is getting Kony noticed so that he is one step closer to being captured,and the abduction of children are put to rest. Invisible Children is a work in progress and there is always room for growth.I am aware that Invisible Children has questionable motives regarding the Kony 2012 video but Invisible Children is a growing organization that realizes their mistakes and are learning from them which was stated in the recent video "Move." IC has good intentions which are to bring children out of harm's way.For this very reason I will consider supporting this organization.

General Member of the Public

Rating: 2

Along with the rest of the general public, I was blown away when the viral video "Kony 2012" outlines the horrible war crimes that Joseph Kony committed. However, I did want to research this campaign and the reasons behind it on my own. After researching IC, I realized that their organization was in some ways helping the people in Uganda. However their is still much room for improvement with this organization. For example only around 37 percent of their finances go to helping rehabilitate and protect the children that the LRA would take. This is a number that could AND should be drastically increased. I'm not saying to not donate to this charity, but do some research and carefully consider before you do

Review from CharityNavigator