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Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Counseling, Health, Mental Health, Mental Health Disorders, Voluntary Health Associations & Medical Disciplines

Mission: The International Paruresis Association is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization whose mission is to cure Paruresis (shy bladder) and improve the lives of all people affected.

Target demographics: Anyone and everyone suffering from paruresis.

Geographic areas served: Worldwide

Programs: Shy Bladder Center, Worldwide IPA Support Groups, and Prisoners with Paruresis

Community Stories

14 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

4

General Member of the Public

Rating: 5

I have two Masters Degrees and am successful in life. Great wife, job, kids. . . I have it all. I however have been controlled by one specific anxiety my whole life. This group helps and is doing very important work with very meaningful consequences for millions of people like me. In my situation, drug testing, which is required, is my worse nightmare even though I have never done any drugs in my life. anyway, this is a great nonprofit.

Don_7

Client Served

Rating: 5

As I said in a previous review a few years ago, the process of getting free from shy bladder is a long one, and IPA has been with me every step of the way. They really understand the problem and have developed an effective workshop-based program for overcoming it. It has been little short of a miracle - still unfolding!

Previous Stories

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I have had a shy bladder for over 50 years, and it was a constant source of worry. My first workshop with IPA and Steve Soifer in Detroit in about 2000 was a revelation; I discovered I was not alone, and that there was a solution to my problem. I have been to many workshops, and many practice sessions with a Toronto group, and the improvement has been amazing - and relieving! Don W

Volunteer

Rating: 1

Are you kidding me???? The end of the world is near!

Greg46

Volunteer

Rating: 1

I had paruresis for over 4 decades . Not much hope for me . And believe me this is hell . Get this info to school children it could end a lot of suffering . A well spent dollar .

Volunteer

Rating: 5

Everyone at the IPA has always been helpful and supportive of anyone asking for help or advice. Since most of the members have "walked the walk", they understand the struggles that each person joining has in their life. My life has truly been transformed since finding the IPA over 10 years ago.

Previous Stories
1

Volunteer

Rating: 5

The Workshops that the SBI runs have changed my life in so many ways it is difficult for most people to imagine. I have started living my life for the first time in 30 years without the worry and anxiety that used to be a part of my life everyday. Through the SBI I have also met so many amazing people and fellow travellers that have offered help and support in my work toward recovery. I don't know of any other venue where you could get help and meet people who understand living with Shy Bladder Syndrome and offer ways to work on recovery.

2 Ted_5

Volunteer

Rating: 5

The worst part about paruresis is thinking that you are alone. Through finding the IPA site, I discovered I wasn't alone and there were people out there who could help. With the information on the website, I was able to start down the long road of recovery. I have been to two workshops, and now am a group leader. Not only have I improved, but I have seen improvement in the quality of life of others. Truly a fantastic group.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

This organization has changed my life in the most positive way. After 30+ years, I am truly free!!!

Previous Stories
9

Client Served

Rating: 5

I was total avoidant from public restrooms for over 30 years and tried most everything on my own to help myself, to no avail. IPA was my last desperate attempt at to salvage my freedom to live life to its fullest. Before the Shy Bladder workshop I was frightened thinking, "if this does not work, I am out of options to free myself of this social phobia". The end of that workshop weekend brought me to the restroom of Comerica park during the 7th inning stretch. After one "misfire", I left the restroom and went back after a few minutes to relieve myself at a urinal with no dividers in between two men; we were almost toe to toe. Absolutely amazing to see what I was capable of. When I went home, I found support and began practicing aggressively what I learned. About 8 months after that, I can say I am a free man. It is hard work; when you are truly motivated to do it, you too will be free to pee :)

Chuck8

Volunteer

Rating: 5

This is the most informative site for those suffering from Paruresis. It was the site that I first discovered the name for my condition, and the efforts of those that run it have led to Urologist and others being educated about it. 5 super stars!

HowardB

Volunteer

Rating: 4

Having endured many years coping with paruresis I have been really pleased to learn and share more with others. Although I still have some difficulty dealing with it, I have improved and understand it much more.

Previous Stories

Client Served

Rating: 4

Paruresis has been part of my life for more than 30 years affecting my quality of life. Only when I found IPA online did I realize that so many others experienced the same problem .

By reading a book obtained through IPA I began to understand this condition. Then I attended an IPA workshop and began to make some progress. Improvement is slow but definite and I am now optimistic that I can overcome much of the aversion that I have to public washrooms.

joe-d

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I would like to take a moment and say how much IPA has helped me. I have struggled with a shy bladder for 90% of my young adulthood life, from the age of 17 until well into my 40s. It was tremendous relief to find the support on IPA users forum bulletin board. The term Paruresis has a more precise definition for this condition. Before there were broad ranging categories that only talked of generalized feelings which could range from lack of self esteem to social anxiety. There was no possible way to describe what I was going through.

I felt alienated from what other people were able to do. Until I found the support group at IPA. I had my library transfer their recovery book to my branch and started reading it from cover to cover. Little by little I was able to grasp the understanding recovery is a gradual process. It is very good to relate with other people who are suffering as well. The most benefit I found was that I could give other people encouragement. I am still having to suppress my anxious feelings. Basically my main concern is will there be any privacy. I have a feeling I am with a bigger majority of people who are thinking the same way. I can say it definitely helps to write things out. To get a better understanding of the problem, is to get it out from the inside and look it in front of myself. I now know not hide the embarrassment and to get the problem out “on the table” to say what is the problem from the very beginning, so others will know what I’m talking about if I seem a little nervous.

Previous Stories
6

General Member of the Public

Rating: 5

I have dealt with Shy Bladder syndrome since as far back as I can remember. It was then considered a problem that only a child has trouble understanding. When we turn 18 we are considered adults. The problem just doesn't go away like a flick of a switch. At 18 I seriously started becoming more concerned and more pre-occupied with this every isolating problem. In my 30's I discovered a website called IPA for International Paruesis Association. From then on, I finally started to identify the problem. Shy Bladder actually has a technical name, Parursis. I became aware that I was not alone. There are many men and women out there of all ages who suffer. The benefits that I received from being able to share my experiences and offer my support to a bulletin board clearly out weigh any costs. In a nut shell, the most important lesson I've learned is to be up front and say what the problem is. I can't thank enough the people who run this site for providing an opportunity to share with and support the many who have lived with Shy Bladder Syndrome everyday of our lives.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I was able to attend a workshop in Baltimore recently and that helped me immensely. Without the IPA I would be still wondering how to improve my phobia and seeking help in people and organizations with no knowledge of what paruresis actually is, let alone the methods to recover from it. For their continual support to thousands of people left in shame and in the dark the IPA provides information through their website and printed materials, provides support through leadership and an online forum, offers workshops with trained therapists for learning recovery techniques, and puts in many hours of research and advocacy for improving the lives of people with paruresis. There is no other source for such effective help and support available to us.