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Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Civil Liberties, Civil Rights, Crime & Law, Crime & Legal-Related, International, Legal Services

Mission: International bridges to justice (ibj) is dedicated to protecting the basic legal rights of ordinary citizens in developing countries. Ibj works to guarantee everyone the right to competent legal representation, protection from cruel and unusual punishment and the right to a fair trial.

Programs: The ibj china defender program has been one of the most successful and long running programs the organization has undertaken. Since the beginning of our partnership with the national legal aid of china (nlac) in 2001, ibj has made a significant impact on the conditions of public defense in china and has contributed to a nationwide transformation of the criminal justice system, especially in the area of juvenile justice. Ibj has trained approximately 2,000 police officers in modern investigative techniques to discourage the use of torture to coerce confessions. Also, every december 4th, the anniversary of china's adoption of its constitution in 1982, ibj conducts an extensive campaign throughout the country to educate citizens about their legal rights in the case of arrest.

singapore- the singapore justice training centre continues to progress as the first regional hub of ibj. It conducted the legal aid systems training for myanmar and the concurrent regional legal aid forum for 17 senior government officials from the union attorney-general's office, supreme court of the union, myanmar police force and lawyers from the myanmar legal aid network. The sessions for skills training and capacity building proved to be a unique platform for meaningful engagement between government officials and young lawyers where open discussion and shared learning experience were realized. Their other achievement is it launch of 50 e-learning modules. The modules are specific to seven asean countries, namely cambodia, indonesia, laos, myanmar, the phillipines, thailand, and vietnam, as well as india. The topics covered by the modules include the rights of the accuses, the rights and obligations of defense attorneys, attorney-client relations, presumption of innocence, defenses, evidence, cross-examination, complaint procedures, pretrial detention, investigative torture, and preventing torture. With these modules, the sjtc is helping an ever-expanding group of lawyers from around the world increase its skills and knowledge through an accessible on-demand training platform.

cambodia - since 2001, ibj has been helping cambodia to rebuild its justice system by organizing training sessions, rights awareness campaigns, roundtable meetings and providing legal aid services. Through its offices located cambodia, ibj holds seminars and training sessions throughout the country to help train attorneys and inform citizens of their rights. Ibj's team works to ensure that cambodia recovers from the extensive genocide perpetrated by the khmer rouge during the 1970s and 1980s and becomes a place where every single citizen can pursue justice.

other program services - ibj has a program called justicemakers that conducts online competitions to support grassroots legal rights projects worldwide. In four competitions since 2008, ibj has selected 46 justicemakers fellows from over 26 countries. Ibj has two inter-related online legal education services that are accessed throughout the world: the legal training resource center and the criminal defense wiki. These services have enabled the distribution of legal knowledge and resources to overcome physical barriers. Finally, ibj has started a new initiative called youth scholars program.

Community Stories

11 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I had the privilege to work for IBJ in 2009 and 2010. IBJ is an amazing organization with the ability to spur real change in local criminal justice systems throughout the world. IBJ has built an intertwined network of global criminal defense lawyers and supporters, aligned in the mission to end torture and improve the basic legal rights of ordinary citizens in developing countries around the world. I think that the performance of the organization could be enhanced by utilizing exisiting partnerships more, and ensuring the sustainability of all programs.

Volunteer

Rating: 4

I started interning at IBJ with little work experience and was made to feel a valuable part of the team from the start. Geneva staff members are passionate, inspiring people who truly believe in their cause. This belief was infectious, and while I was working there, they proved that they could achieve much of what they sought to.
The 2011 JusticeMakers competition, which I helped organize, awarded 10 lawyers in developing countries (particularly Latin America, a relatively new region to the work of IBJ) with grants to help improve their criminal justice systems.
I also drafted reports to fundraisers and wrote fundraising proposals, which required me to read surveys and research on the results that IBJ achieves in the countries they work in, and found all of this very heartening.
Though at times I was a little overwhelmed by some of the tasks I was asked to carry out (IBJ staff delegate a great deal), it meant that I learnt so much and felt like a valuable part of the team.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I worked with IBJ's Cambodia branch ansd was based in the Pursat office. Cambodia has a very high rate of illegal pre-trial detention and a serious shortage of criminal defense lawyers. For these reasons IBJ's work is instrumental. The Pursat Office carried a very heavy case load and at the time only had one lawyer on hand. In addition to the case load, transportation and communication obstacles also slowed the office's ability to serve the community. Despite these set-backs, the staff was incredibly dedicated and had a large impact on the community.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

In the summer of 2010, I was fortunate to work with one of IBJ's JusticeMaker fellows in rural, western Kenya. Over the past year, the fellow had done work to promote women's legal rights in an area where women traditionally are either unaware of or unable/unwilling to exercise their rights due to tradition. Through community meetings and various other outreach channels like radio shows, he had provided knowledge and an accompanying desire for change to many members of his community, and subsequently set up meetings with local government officials where people could express their concerns.
During my stay, he was still working tirelessly to promote discussion and advocacy for better governance in the region. I attended many, many community meetings to discuss the upcoming referendum on a new Constitution as well as other community concerns, including those surrounding prison conditions and the inadequacies of the legal system.
I was also fortunate enough to work briefly with another IBJ funded organization in the nearby city of Kisumu. Awarded a JusticeMaker fellowship in the same year, CLEAR Kisumu is essentially a legal aid organization for citizens who probably otherwise would not be able to afford/retain representation. While it is part of a broader organization, the Kisumu office was started as a result of IBJ funding. Even in my short time there, I could see their positive impact on the community and the legal environment in western Kenya, which is an 8-hour, pothole filled world away from the comparative sophistication of Nairobi. I attended a paralegal training where one of the attorneys was explaining basic property law to local citizens and outlining the forms and procedure required by the courts. Those citizens were then setting up a legal aid center, where they could turn around and help other citizens. Another day I tagged along to a prison where the attorneys and staff members made a presentation on the upcoming constitutional referendum and answered some of the inmates legal questions. At the prison it was very apparent that the legal system moves very slowly in Kenya and that many of the inmates would not have representation at all - even to answer routine questions about paperwork/forms to be filed at the court - if it weren't for the Kisumu office. As far as I remember, the inmates are provided with a single typewriter to type their own appeals, so any time or correspondence wtih an attorney can be extremely helpful.

I had an overall fantastic experience living and working in Kenya for the summer with two of IBJ's JusticeMaker fellowship recipients. The work that the $5,000 fellowships made possible was valuable to the community and humbling to behold - I saw people whose homes have no running water or electricity passionately advocating for improvement to the system of governance, the legal culture, and the prison system in their country. As an American law student interested in rule of law work in the future, my experience with IBJ was, in short, awesome, and it would be hard to overstate the importance of the work they supported in Kenya.

Volunteer

Rating: 4

I volunteered with International Bridges to Justice from September 2010 until December 2010 as a law school graduate on deferral from my permanent job with a law firm in Washington, DC. Overall, I really enjoyed my experience with IBJ. The staff is very small, which means a lot of one on one attention, and very dedicated to their organization. I worked primarily on helping establish and execute a grass roots competition to attract local attorneys in primarily Latin American countries to submit proposals for ideas they had on how to strengthen the rule of law in their country through educational or hands on programs. It was a good experience in teamwork as well as work management. Furthermore, I wrote a grant to help increase project funding for grass roots initiatives that focused on the intersection of criminal justice and HIV/AIDS.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

As a volunteer for IBJ, I worked on a closely-knit team to plan and administer a grass-roots criminal justice competition called JusticeMakers. This competition gave international legal professionals the support and means to implement their own criminal justice initiative. I acted as the main point of contact to the competition's applicants, which meant that I was in constant contact with people from around the world.

Volunteers at IBJ have a lot of responsibility, and my supervisor was always supportive and willing to take on my ideas. Overall, this was an incredible experience, and I felt that I learned so much, both from communicating with international professionals and from the fantastic team at IBJ.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

IBJ is a human rights organization that seeks to end criminal investigatory torture by strengthening the rule of law and developing legal aid systems in developing countries.

IBJ is a great place to work - the management board is nurturing and inspiring, the work is challenging and fascinating, and the international coworkers are amazing. While working there, my writing significantly improved and I was given the opportunities to meet brilliant legal minds at conferences, galas and other events.

IBJ works largely off volunteers, many of which are short-term volunteers. When I left the organization, I wish I could have stayed longer. Because of the goals of the organization, longevity and sustainability are important and some small details can go overlooked with a lot of short term volunteerships. I would recommend that people seeking to volunteer full time with this organization do so for no less than 9 months. Otherwise, they should work on very discrete projects.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I worked with IBJ for several months, and had the privilege of witnessing its dedicated staff respond to emergency legal rights infringements as well as develop clear long-term strategies to ensure the organization's survival and impact. Both tasks were done with incredible talent and compassion, and while the staff worked very long hours to serve their large base of clients and fellows, I never heard a complaint or even a sigh. Perhaps even more telling of the staff's strength was the organization's ability to customize its relationship with clients and fellows in each of its target countries (more than 9) and provide legal, training, and campaign solutions that effectively served each. IBJ has a very special place in my heart, and I hope it continues to challenge people's stuck notions of what a small organization is capable of achieving! I am indebted to IBJ for making me believe in the impossible.

Matt S.

Volunteer

Rating: 4

I volunteered with IBJ for two months in their headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland. While there, I primarily worked on developing training materials for criminal defense lawyers in several Indian states. The organization works to improve the quality of representation available to criminal defendants in developing countries who cannot afford to hire lawyers. Their method is to recruit promising attorneys from the local community as fellows who then go out and train other attorneys in best practices in criminal defense work. The mission should be incredibly important to anyone concerned about human rights and anyone who appreciates the importance of affording accused persons adequate representation. Methodologically, IBJ has chosen the right approach: their programs focus on working with local legal services networks and capitalizing on the expertise of the attorneys there rather than imposing any pre-fabricated program that does not take account of local variations. The group's emphasis on the fellows as the primary engines of reform and activism is a key part of their success and of their organizational philosophy.

Volunteer

Rating: 4

The organisation seeks to end the use of torture as an investigative tool through the provision of legal representation.

I was assisting with the JusticeMakers programme, which is an online competition for individuals to submit legal rights project applications and the winner receiving funding to implement their idea. During my internship I was able to help human rights activists from across Africa and Asia. I really enjoyed the opportunity to interact with those working in the field and learning first hand of the problems they must deal with.

Working as an intern at IBJ was an interesting and invaluable experience.