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Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Civil Rights, Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, Ear & Throat Diseases, Education, Health, Health Care

Mission: The Mission of HLAA is to open the world of communication to people with hearing loss by providing information, education, support and advocacy. HLAA is the nation’s leading organization representing people with hearing loss. Hearing loss is the third largest public health issue after heart disease and arthritis. 48 million (20 percent) Americans have some degree of hearing loss.

Programs:

Held annually, the HLAA convention is completely hearing accessible to people with hearing loss. A wide-range of up-to-date information is made available to attendees and hearing health professionals through educational workshops that are eligible for CEUS, a research symposium, and a large trade show exhibiting the latest hearing assistive technology.

Community Stories

36 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

1

Volunteer

Rating: 5

A superb organization providing information & support to persons living with hearing loss, including coping strategies, information on rapidly developing assistive technology and advocacy services. Help is providing through an excellent magazine, informational programs, captioned webinars, chat rooms, programs sponsored by local chapters, discounts on phones and assistive listening devices, etc.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

There are a lot of dedicated staff at the national and local levels. My life has changed for the better in the 5 years that I've been involved.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I became aware of HLAA and the local Colorado Springs Chapter as a member of Sertoma, Inc. SERTOMA has a partnership arrangement with HLAA because of our common mission of extending services to the hearing impaired and promoting hearing health. For the past two and one half years I have been a member HLAA. I can honestly say that through the interaction with the local chapter members and leadership plus reading the Hearing Loss magazine my knowledge has increased exponentially.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

Best way to overcome the loneliness of hearing loss.

staffov

Volunteer

Rating: 5

People with hearing loss struggle to obtain and maintain employment. Employers struggle to assist them. HLAA brought the 2 together for a 3-hour Symposium at its Annual Convention in June. Hundreds of employers and workers with hearing loss engaged in a frank discussion of issues and solutions. HLAA is the first to ever sponsor this kind of activity and it is part of an on-going effort to open the world of communication and full participation in public life for people with hearing loss. HLAA also advocates at the national level for solutions that will better the lives of workers with hearing loss. Valerie Stafford-Mallis

Previous Stories
1

Board Member

Rating: 5

I am a late-deafened adult who is still working. I lost my hearing during what should have been the peak years of my career. Had I known about the Hearing loss Association of America, I could have availed myself earlier of all the wonderful education, advocacy and support than I did. However, it is never too late. I am so grateful to be a part of HLAA. The education, advocacy, and support I have received by being a member in HLAA has enabled me to achieve and maintain competitive employment in the career of my choice. I am so grateful!

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I have belonged to HLAA for 35 years. I found HLAA in 1984.
In gratitude I have been Editor of the state newsletter for 15 years,
The Hearing Loss Californian. FREE, 20 pages in color, with a database of 5300 names.
People with hearing loss have an invisibile disability.
HLAA works to give us access to movies, internet, theater, etc
with FM, Infrared and room loops
HLAA has a convention once a year.The 2016 Convention is in June in Washington, DC..
At their conventions, everything is accessible.
All workshops are captioned for instance. People with hearing loss need support.
I consider my HLAA friends to be my second family

Volunteer

Rating: 5

As a volunteer board member on both the local chapter and the state levels and as a delegate to national HLAA conventions I have experienced and observed the services and activities that HLAA provides for people with Hearing Loss. It is a one-stop organization for information, references, and help. Additionally, they advocate in the public domain to make venues and activities accessible to those with hearing loss. When my profound hearing loss was identified 25 years ago I did not know anyone with a hearing loss, nor where to go for information. Since then through HLAA I have found a wealth of information, resources, and friendships.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

Hearing Loss Association of America is a wonderful organization that helps people with hearing loss through support advocacy and education. I have found many wonderful friendships from being part of this organization. From those friendship forges the ability to advocate and educate others about hearing loss and HLAA.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

HLAA teaches people how to cope with hearing loss. It is the best source of information on assistive devices and how to hear in challenging situations. HLAA is my favorite non profit because it does its job of educating hard of hearing well. What a difference HLAA made in my life. It gave me the tools to succeed in Graduate School.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

My mom had profound hearing loss from about the age of 45 years. My dad understood what she was going through but I really didn't get it. She got involved with Rocky and Amie and SHHH and her life improved dramatically. Then I lost my hearing and eventually was put on the HLAA national board. After the 2nd meeting several board members took me aside and told me I should go to NYU to be evaluated for a cochlear implant. I did this and shortly thereafter Dr. Thomas Roland implanted a cochlear on my left side. I feel so lucky to have gotten my life back and I owe it to HLAA.

Previous Stories

Board Member

Rating: 5

While in the receiving line at my wedding my Mom realized she couldn't hear the names of people introduced to her. Her hearing continued to decline and she was fitted for stronger and stronger hearing aids bilaterally. Going to social events was difficult in spite of my father's translating much of what was being said. It got to the point that she didn't want to go out. Then my parents met Rocky and Ahmy Stone and attended the SHHH Conference in Chicago. Those two events were life changers for my mom. She learned to speak up for herself and started the first SHHH (later to be renamed HLAA) chapters in Winnetka, IL and Sarasota, FL. She also taught lip reading for over 35 years.

Thus when my hearing began to go I knew to ask for hearing aids. I received one in my right ear but was told that I was deaf in my left ear and a hearing aid would not help that ear and I was not a candidate for a cochlear implant. After asking for a cochlear implant for several years I was told by fellow HLAA trustees to get out of the state in which I live and go to New York. I now have a cochlear implant and have my life back.