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Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Animals, Protection of Endangered Species

Mission: CCF's mission is to be the internationally recognised centre of excellence in the conservation of cheetahs and their ecosystems. CCF will work with all stakeholders to develop best practices in research, education, and land use to benefit all species, including people.

Results: Our progress reports are available online at http://www.cheetah.org/?nd=progress_reports

Target demographics: Everyone who must co-exist with wildlife in all cheetah-range countries (23 in Africa and Iran in the Middle East).

Geographic areas served: Africa, Iran

Programs: Research (population biology, health and reproduction, cheetah ecology, ecosystem research); Livestock Guarding Dogs program; contact with farming community; education activities; eco-tourism; international programs (Kenya, Iran, Botswana, International Cheetah Studbook); development & international fundraising; visitors to CCF; volunteer program

Community Stories

8 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

Earth Endeavours Media

Donor

Rating: 5

A Foundation that integrates local knowledge and skill with global innovation and effort, to ensure a future for wild cheetahs. CCF's methods engage audiences near and far, educating and inspiring creative solutions that benefit both nature and us.

Toni A.

Donor

Rating: 5

As with all big cats, I am very concerned with their survival. Their numbers have been declining at alarming rates. From a very young age I have loved cheetahs. I found the Cheetah Conservation Fund years ago and support them with a donation whenever I can. I plan to apply to volunteer in Namibia to work with them directly , hopefully next year. They have done amazing work for cheetahs.

Review from Guidestar

Donor

Rating: 5

Without the work of CCF the amazing cheetah may not stand a chance for survival.

Lynn12

Donor

Rating: 5

My family and I have been following and donating to the Cheetah Conservation Fund since 2008. We continue to be amazed at the huge impact CCF has made in preserving the cheetah species. They have made great strides educating farmers and providing them with trained Anatolian Shepard dogs that ward off straying cheetahs. These farmers used to shoot the cheetahs on sight. They also have released trapped cheetahs back into the wild. They are indeed an amazing group. Thank God for Dr. Laurie Marker and her team!

Donor

Rating: 5

I am both a donor and volunteer for CCF. I first got to know co-founder and CEO of CCF, Dr. Laurie Marker, on a safari around Namibia that she led in May 2007. I returned to Namibia in 2008 to volunteer, to contribute my scientific expertise in Genetics and to learn more about these magnificent animals. What sets CCF apart from many other animal conservation charities is Laurie's approach to the problem of imminent cheetah extinction. She strove to understand why the farmers were killing predator cheetahs and has developed a multi-pronged approach to reduce that centered on education. Her organization is an international model for similar animal conservation organizations. In addition to African farmers, CCF trains conservationist from around the world, removes thorny bush and makes logs used in European stoves, breeds Anatolian and Kangal guard dogs to keep cheetahs away from a farmer's livestock (they are donated to the farmers after the farmers are trained to make use of them), they provide a sanctuary for injured cheetahs that are treated and either reintroduced to the wild or housed in a large habitat. Their scientific research on the behavior and genetics of this animal is now allowing the reintroduction of cheetahs into the wild that previously wouldn't have been able to survive. They are also being successfully reintroduced into former habitats. This is only a partial list.. (Go to their website to learn more). I don't know why the ratings were originally low, but I'm certain now that they have achieved a 4-star rating, they won't drop below that in the future. One of Laurie's latest recognition was being named a Rainer Arnhold Fellow. These awardees are social entrepreneurs with promising solutions to the big problems in health, poverty, and conservation in developing countries. It is her entrepreneurial spirit that drew me to support her organization (I was an early employee at a successful biotech company). Once knowing her, I learned of her committment to encouraging the talent in her adopted country and continent to work towards the common goal. But it is really the impact this organization is making on worldwide animal conservation, serving as a model for how to approach this problem of animal extinction, that is makes this excellent organization stand out and be worthy of your financial support.

Review from CharityNavigator

Donor

Rating: 4

I honestly don't understand the low rating. CCF is doing more to save the severely endangered cheetah than any other organization. They seem to care about the people in the cheetah's ecosystem as well as the cheetahs which is important to me.

Review from CharityNavigator

Donor

Rating: 5

I'v met Dr. Marker. She works tirelessly and effectively against the extinction of the Cheetah in Africa, --not amassing a fortune as some other CEO's of NGOs. She is enirely dedicated to her work, using her teaching and negotiating skills to help the local population understand the value of environmental protection.

Review from CharityNavigator

Donor

Rating: 5

I first learned about the Cheetah Conservation Fund in July, 2008 when I read an article about them in a back issue (March 2008) of Smithsonian Magazine. The article described how the cheetah had shrunk from a population of 100,000 in 1900 to a present level of between 10,000 and 12,000 worldwide, making them a highly endangered species and possibly threatened with extinction in the not-so-distant future. The article told about an American woman with experience with cheetahs, Dr. Laurie Marker, who was so heart-stricken about this eventuality that she sold her possessions, moved to Namibia (where most of the remaining cheetah population lives), and started the Cheetah Conservation Fund to try to help these beautiful creatures and spread the word to the rest of the world to join in, too.
This article hit me like a hammer. It was so upsetting to me that I could not sleep that night. I got up, went to the computer, and did some reading about cheetahs. They are a unique genus of cat unlike any other big cat in the world. Many of us know them to be the fastest land animal (up to 70 mph), but that's just the beginning. Historically, they were literally the consort of kings, revered by Egyptian pharaohs, Iranian kings, and Indian rajahs. Cheetahs were part of the Egyptians' religion, and they also accompanied the rulers and their royal party to hunt for sport. These powerful men were so besotted with cheetahs that they were allowed to roam freely on the palace grounds, and some made it into the palaces, too! One Indian king had 10,000 of them. Anyway, the more I read, the more I was hooked. CCF got me with a one-two punch that night, and I joined them and never looked back.
CCF is an incredible organization that makes every donated dollar do something for the cheetah. What I find especially fascinating is the organization's ability to think outside the box to solve problems. The Namibian farmers have always disliked and feared the cheetah because it will occasionally eat a lamb or a goat; the country is so poor that the loss of even one animal can result in starvation for the farmer and his family. CCF's solution? Educational seminars for the farmers; they will even pay visits to the farmer's homes if they cannot come to the CCF center in Otjiwarongo. And most interestingly, CCF has started a program to breed Anatolian shepherd guard dogs to be given free to the farmers to guard their flocks. Another spectacularly successful endeavor resulted from the problem of acacia thornbushes overrunning the land, which can blind cheetahs when they run into them while running after their dinner. CCF solved the problem by harvesting the thornbushes (using Namibian labor, that they might make money for their families) and compressing them into a burnable log called the BushBlok. Sales of the BushBlok logs directly benefit CCF. CCF actually makes the problems part of the solution! They are trustworthy stewards of the funds they receive.

Review from Guidestar