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Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Animals, Protection of Endangered Species, Wildlife Preservation & Protection, Wildlife Sanctuaries

Mission: Established in 1988, the non-profit raptor resource project specializes in the preservation of falcons, eagles, ospreys, hawks, and owls. We create, improve, and directly maintain over 40 nests and nest sites, provide training in nest site creation and management, and develop innovations in nest site management and viewing that bring people closer to the natural world. Our mission is to preserve and strengthen raptor populations, expand participation in raptor preservation, and help foster the next generation of preservationists.

Target demographics: preserve falcons, eagles, ospreys, hawks, and owls.

Geographic areas served: Iowa, Wisconsin, and Minnesota

Programs: We create, improve, and directly maintain over 40 nests and nest sites, provide training in nest site creation and management, and develop innovations in nest site management and viewing that bring people closer to the natural world.

Community Stories

24 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

glogdog

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I started watching the Decorah Eagle cam in 2011 and became a volunteer for them in 2012. Why? Because the eagle cam showed me the wonders of nature up close and personal, amazing me every step of the way and taught me that together, people can share, learn, and make a difference in this world, both environmentally and to each other. I was not aware of issues like lead poisoning in raptors caused by lead ammunition and lead fishing tackle, not aware of death by electrocution from power lines and death from car collisions. Part of RRP's mission is to "help foster the next generation of preservationists" and they are doing just that. There are many classrooms across the U.S. and the world watching the eagle cam now. With over 341 million views since 2011 on Ustream, the eagle cam is the most watched wildlife education camera in the world. It helps to remind all of us that we must be stewards of our environment which will help perpetuate wildlife. Additionally, because of the efforts of Raptor Resource Project's original director, Bob Anderson, the Peregrine Falcon made a comeback to the Central United States and the Mississippi River cliffs. Some of the Decorah Eagles offspring, through tracking devices, have been and are currently part of a longitudinal study of raptors post-dispersal which will help us to learn of breeding and feeding grounds and the necessity to preserve these areas. Last season’s acceptance of a man-made starter nest might possibly lead the way for increasing populations of birds where needed. RRP has made a difference in so many ways to both the world and the people that watch their cameras. I would hope that this review will inspire others to donate and participate in, this worthwhile organization.

Previous Stories
2

Donor

Rating: 5

Bob Anderson has been helping to keep falcons, eagles, kestrels, various types of raptors alive for many years. Because of the Decorah Eagle Cam, I have gained a better understanding and education of bald eagles which has led me to learn about other raptors as well. It has increased my awareness of the delicate balance between humans and wildlife and how we all must be stewards on earth.

Judy171

Donor

Rating: 5

I discovered the Raptor Resource Project (RRP) in 2013 through their live streaming of the Decorah eagle nest and the incredible gentle lessons taught regarding the way of the eagle. I feel like I have had a new world open for me with regard to the patience and perseverance of both the eagles and the incredible folks from RRP. RRP teaches us viewers so much and in so many ways. Some is through the remarkable blogs written on the RRP research but most are though the incredible community guided by RRP that has arisen as we have shared both the miracles and sorrows of life as an eagle in the modern world. When I first experienced the late Bob Anderson, I immediately realized that he was the real deal. That his dedication and love for the raptors was a total rarity in our society. RRP contributes an incredible source of positive energy to our weary planet in each of its activities. There aren't too many people or organizations that I would say this about. A deep bow of appreciation to all the folks carrying on Bob's legacy and vision. I am proud to be a small part of this community and to make a monthly donation to its activities.

4 Pagent D.

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I have been a volunteer with and a donor to this organization since 2011. Their commitment to education is phenomenal. Within the past five years RRP lost two key board members: Rob McIntyre, the Board President and, in 2015, Bob Anderson, the founder of Raptor Resource Project. The organization strengthened after each loss and continues the legacy and mission of RRP. They are terrific stewards of raptors. Their website at raptorresource.org and their Facebook page at Raptor Resource Project are full of information. This is the organization with the cameras on the world famous Decorah Bald Eagles. Additionally this organization's commitment to the peregrine falcon is something to behold. They have several eagle cams, many falcon cams and kestrels cams. You will find a camera and a nest that will delight and enthrall you!!

1

Donor

Rating: 5

If you love raptors or just the preservation of wildlife, this is a terrific organization to support. RRP has incredibly dedicated staff and volunteers who work tirelessly to protect these beautiful birds and to give the public an intimate peek at raptor life via the wonderful nest cams. I'm hooked on the Decorah Eagles! :)

Review from Guidestar

3

Donor

Rating: 5

The Raptor Resource Project, most commonly known as RRP, is responsible for the Decorah Eagle cam. The cam has had such an impact all over the world. It has brought a nest of a pair of bald eagles into so many homes; it has educated and inspired so many lives. But, the Decorah cam is just a small part of all the work RRP does. RRP monitors more than 50 nests of owls, bald eagles, red tail hawks, kestrels, peregrine falcons, vultures, etc. Because of RRP the population of peregrine falcons is on the rise. Now they have another very important project, to save the Philippine eagle, a national bird that is in peril of extinction if something is not done soon. Knowing the dedication of RRP, they will be successful. It's amazing how some organizations like RRP, with so little resources can do so much. Bob Anderson and all the volunteers are dedicating their lives for such great cause, to save raptors and they are great at it!!

2

Volunteer

Rating: 5

Raptor Resource Project monitors at least 53 nest sites that include falcons, kestrels, eagles, owls, and a turkey vulture. Their objective is the preservation of raptors. In helping to educate millions through the live streaming of nest cameras, they are bringing awareness to the general public. I believe their work in bringing the Peregrine Falcon back to the cliffs of the Mississippi River is unprecedented. This is a small but mighty organization.

2 Marsha14

General Member of the Public

Rating: 5

I had always thought eagles were majestic birds, but I knew little about raptors in general. Since finding RRP on Facebook, then viewing the nestcams, I have gained an education unlike I would have imagined. The connection with the raptors, as well as the staff and volunteers, has become very personal and genuine for me and thousands of others. It is impressive to watch their response to the concerns of so many people as they care for and promote the raptor population. This is truly human-kind at it's best. I look forward to following the adventures of the Decorah eagles daily, and welcome the information RRP shares about the plight of raptors everywhere.

2

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I found this eagle camera in 2011 when RRP switched to Ustream. The picture and sound quality were so advanced in comparison to other eagle sites it blew me away. The chat room was focused on sharing information about eagles with civility and helping each other understand what we were seeing.

RRP has as one of it's primary goals educating students about all raptors. The word “students” encompasses all ages from 2 year olds who sit on grandma/granpa's laps and learn at the most rudimentary level to 93 year olds who gather in community rooms to complete their life long journey of watching nature, now on screen rather than hiking through woods. I know this is life changing for all; it certainly has changed my life for the better and not just from the knowledge gained about the natural, wild world but in making me a better person.

RRP also has a goal of raptors first. Their initial thought in doing anything is how can we gain information in the least intrusive way possible. They also have the well being of the eagles, falcons, and turkey vultures they monitor in the forefront of their thoughts at all times.

Just as eagles are frugal (value for expenditure), RRP has proven time and time again that donations are used in the wisest ways possible.

2 Lynn75

General Member of the Public

Rating: 5

This is a very dedicated group that is led by a passionate director. They are focused on educating the public on raptors and also saving these beautiful creatures. I discovered RRP by accident this past spring. I've followed them every day since, especially watching the 2014 Deborah eagles. Despite some of the heartbreaking events that occur, they keep going with the utmost professionalism and enthusiasm. They're wonderful, never giving up on their mission, no matter what the challenge.

4

Donor

Rating: 5

I researched about Bob Anderson and Raptor Resource Project for quite some time before I decided to spend my time watching their cams and my money donating. The organization has integrity and a true passion for their mission. They are incredibly responsible from a fiduciary point of view and they are appreciative for their donors.