Over 1.8 million nonprofits and charities for donors, volunteers and funders

Claim This Nonprofit

More Info

Add to Favorites

Share this Nonprofit

Donate

Nonprofit Overview

Causes: Animal Services, Animals, Crime & Law, Health, Health Care, Inmate Support, Job Training, Vocational Rehabilitation

Mission: The prison pet partnership program rescues and trains homeless dogs to provide service dogs for persons with disabilites and operates a boarding and grooming facility to provide vocational education to women inmates.

Programs: The vocational education program currently employees 18 offender staff. Twelve of these women work in our boarding facility working with anywhere from 28 to 45 dogs. Job duties include feeding, walking, cleaning and overall environmental management of a kennel. The grooming department of ppp currently employees 6 offender groomers. These women groom over 250 dogs and cats per month. Two of the groomers have their certification from the international professional groomers in salon details and have also taken the practical exam for the non-sporting breed. Four new grooming students started the program in april and are in training for the salon details certification. Ppp saw one of its long time offender employee release into the community in august of this year. Only 2 weeks after her release she was able to land as a pet dog groomer.

in the past year, the service dog program rescued 20 dogs from shelters, rescue groups and private individuals from the region and throughout the country. These dogs were placed with women inmates for obedience training and advanced service dog training at two women's prisons. Between the two locations, the service dog program employed 23 women inmates as primary or secondary trainers. Eight women graduated from the training program. During their time working as trainers, these women collectively trained 30 adopted pets with basic obedience. The service dog program provided classes in basic canine care, basic & advanced obedience training as well as service dog training. These classes provided almost 200 hours of education and training to 40 women. Volunteers devoted over 2600 hours, helping promote the service dog program at local festivals and events and helping socialize our dogs to working in public.

Community Stories

2 Stories from Volunteers, Donors & Supporters

1

Client Served

Rating: 5

I have had five dogs over the past 34 years, and as much as I’ve hated to do it, there’ve been times when I’ve had to board them at a kennel. Of the six kennels that I’ve used over the years, the one operated by the Prison Pet Partnership Program is, hands down, the very best of them all. Here’s what makes PPPP’s kennel operation so special to me: a) Service: The offenders who run the day-to-day aspects of the kennel operation are both pet and pet owner friendly. When I’ve dropped off my dogs with the offenders, I know that I’ve left them in very caring hands. b) Cleanliness: The PPPP kennel is spotless and odor-free. I’ve visited some kennels where the odor was so foul that it’s made me gag. That’s not the case at the PPPP kennel. c) Affordability: I pay $28 a day to board my two pooches, which is just about one-half the rate that’s charged at other kennels in the area where I live. d) Security: Years ago, one of my dogs escaped from the kennel where it was being boarded. Although the dog was eventually recovered, I’ve been concerned ever since about my dogs running away. Getting loose at a kennel that’s operated inside a prison isn’t going to happen!

2

Volunteer

Rating: 5

I have been a volunteer with the PPPP for almost six years now and have to say it has been one of the best experiences I have ever had. It is an honor to be involved with a group that has such a positive influence both on unwanted dogs and people that have made a few mistakes but are trying to overcome their past. When I first heard about the program I was not enthusiastic about inmates having animals to play with while inprisoned, then I learned about all of the hard work that the inmates have to do to help the otherwise unwanted dogs to reach their full potential, either as a service dog or beloved pet. This program is such wonderful service for both the dogs, inmates and the folks that receive a service for no charge. It benefits everyone involoved, employees, volunteers and those who are inadvertently touched by the PPPP. The fundraisers are entertaining and very worthy of the time it takes to organize these events, I wholeheartedly endorse this program!