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International Bridges To Justice

Rating: 4.75 stars   16 reviews 4,143

Address:

198 Tremont Street No 447 Boston MA 02116 USA

Mission:

International bridges to justice (ibj) is dedicated to protecting the basic legal rights of ordinary citizens in developing countries. Ibj works to guarantee everyone the right to competent legal representation, protection from cruel and unusual punishment and the right to a fair trial.

Programs:

The ibj china defender program has been one of the most successful and long running programs the organization has undertaken. Since the beginning of our partnership with the national legal aid of china (nlac) in 2001, ibj has made a significant impact on the conditions of public defense in china and has contributed to a nationwide transformation of the criminal justice system, especially in the area of juvenile justice. Ibj has trained approximately 2,000 police officers in modern investigative techniques to discourage the use of torture to coerce confessions. Also, every december 4th, the anniversary of china's adoption of its constitution in 1982, ibj conducts an extensive campaign throughout the country to educate citizens about their legal rights in the case of arrest.

singapore- the singapore justice training centre continues to progress as the first regional hub of ibj. It conducted the legal aid systems training for myanmar and the concurrent regional legal aid forum for 17 senior government officials from the union attorney-general's office, supreme court of the union, myanmar police force and lawyers from the myanmar legal aid network. The sessions for skills training and capacity building proved to be a unique platform for meaningful engagement between government officials and young lawyers where open discussion and shared learning experience were realized. Their other achievement is it launch of 50 e-learning modules. The modules are specific to seven asean countries, namely cambodia, indonesia, laos, myanmar, the phillipines, thailand, and vietnam, as well as india. The topics covered by the modules include the rights of the accuses, the rights and obligations of defense attorneys, attorney-client relations, presumption of innocence, defenses, evidence, cross-examination, complaint procedures, pretrial detention, investigative torture, and preventing torture. With these modules, the sjtc is helping an ever-expanding group of lawyers from around the world increase its skills and knowledge through an accessible on-demand training platform.

cambodia - since 2001, ibj has been helping cambodia to rebuild its justice system by organizing training sessions, rights awareness campaigns, roundtable meetings and providing legal aid services. Through its offices located cambodia, ibj holds seminars and training sessions throughout the country to help train attorneys and inform citizens of their rights. Ibj's team works to ensure that cambodia recovers from the extensive genocide perpetrated by the khmer rouge during the 1970s and 1980s and becomes a place where every single citizen can pursue justice.

other program services - ibj has a program called justicemakers that conducts online competitions to support grassroots legal rights projects worldwide. In four competitions since 2008, ibj has selected 46 justicemakers fellows from over 26 countries. Ibj has two inter-related online legal education services that are accessed throughout the world: the legal training resource center and the criminal defense wiki. These services have enabled the distribution of legal knowledge and resources to overcome physical barriers. Finally, ibj has started a new initiative called youth scholars program.

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www.ibj.org

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Reviews for International Bridges To Justice

Rating: 5 stars  

IBJ is an amazing organization led by a charismatic, thoughtful and dynamic women, Karen Tse. She leads a terrific team of talented staff who punch way above their weight class. The' impossible' is but a challenge for IBJ. Anything is possible if you have a plan, are smart and determined. And that exemplifies the work of IBJ. IBJ moves mountains. It is the cutting edge innovator in fighting against torture and providing legal assistance and aid in difficult circumstances.

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

..my work as former board president.

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

...keep it exactly as it is. It is on the right track.

 
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Rating: 5 stars  

The focus of IBJ’s mission impresses me. The rights of an accused person, and the effective invocation of those rights by a defender on behalf of the accused, are so fundamental to a fair and just society. Yet, the ordinary citizen accused of a petty crime is so easily forgotten among the numerous social justice causes clamoring for society’s attention. IBJ does not forget.

IBJ’s practical, results-oriented approach also impresses me. IBJ works simultaneously with those who can lend legitimacy to its efforts – governments, bar associations, local officials – and with those who are on the frontlines of protecting criminal defense rights everyday – the legal aid and private bar defenders, of course, but also those with whom they interact, including police, prosecutors and judges. IBJ has a lofty vision of fair and equitable criminal justice systems, but its day-to-day work is in the trenches.

Finally, the audacious determination and undaunted dedication, not only of IBJ’s Founder and CEO Karen Tse, but also of the IBJ Staff, IBJ Fellows and IBJ JusticeMakers, is impressive beyond words. Nothing stops their efforts: not the pervasiveness of torture as a criminal investigation tool, not the prevalent political difficulties in the countries IBJ enters, not the enormity of the challenge. When Karen Tse says, “I believe it is possible to end torture in my lifetime,” how can we not help her and IBJ to do that?

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

… speaking with defenders who have had the benefit of IBJ training. The skills training certainly helps them, but more importantly, these defenders are emboldened by the training. IBJ gives them the courage needed for their difficult work by showing them that they are not alone, but part of a collegial and increasingly well-equipped criminal defense bar that has international support.

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

... expand its resources for growing and developing fiscal support. The demand for IBJ's services seems to grow faster does the pool of funds to provide those services.

 
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Rating: 5 stars  

I had the privilege to work for IBJ in 2009 and 2010. IBJ is an amazing organization with the ability to spur real change in local criminal justice systems throughout the world. IBJ has built an intertwined network of global criminal defense lawyers and supporters, aligned in the mission to end torture and improve the basic legal rights of ordinary citizens in developing countries around the world. I think that the performance of the organization could be enhanced by utilizing exisiting partnerships more, and ensuring the sustainability of all programs.

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

I witnessed the growth of all of IBJ’s programs, particularly in Cambodia where vast steps have been made towards the implementation of a state sponsored legal aid system. In my time at IBJ I watched the Program grow from one to four offices, provide legal representation to more citizens, and develop a system where local courts refer cases directly to IBJ. I also watched IBJ reach out to a new region, Latin America, through the 2011 JusticeMakers Competition. These were great achievements.

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

I think that existing programs could be greatly strengthened by an increase in funding support, which would allow the programs to grow beyond their current capacity.

 
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Rating: 4 stars  

I started interning at IBJ with little work experience and was made to feel a valuable part of the team from the start. Geneva staff members are passionate, inspiring people who truly believe in their cause. This belief was infectious, and while I was working there, they proved that they could achieve much of what they sought to.
The 2011 JusticeMakers competition, which I helped organize, awarded 10 lawyers in developing countries (particularly Latin America, a relatively new region to the work of IBJ) with grants to help improve their criminal justice systems.
I also drafted reports to fundraisers and wrote fundraising proposals, which required me to read surveys and research on the results that IBJ achieves in the countries they work in, and found all of this very heartening.
Though at times I was a little overwhelmed by some of the tasks I was asked to carry out (IBJ staff delegate a great deal), it meant that I learnt so much and felt like a valuable part of the team.

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

By working as an intern.

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

Employ more full-time staff so there would be more continuity between the JusticeMakers competitions, for example.

 
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Rating: 5 stars  

Over the 10 years of its existence, International Bridges to Justice has done more to protect and advance the human and legal rights of the average citizen of those countries it serves, through its collaborative and educational approach, than any other organization anywhere. We are led by the Rev. Karen Tse, whose individual idealism and determination have made the most extensive and most beneficial difference in more lives and more countries than any other human rights advocate today. I am truly honored to be a small part of this great mission and to serve alongside some of the best people I have ever known.

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

I have personally witnessed the changes in behavior, language and treatment by the government agents and officials who are charged with enforcing the rule of law in their respective countries, resulting in evolved attitudes on the part of the government and the affected citizenry. Everyone seems to be touched by their experience with IBJ. It is truly amazing to witness the amount of difference that a single mission can make.

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

provide IBJ with more funding in order to expand their work to more countries and reach more governments and people in need.

 
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Rating: 5 stars  

I worked with IBJ's Cambodia branch ansd was based in the Pursat office. Cambodia has a very high rate of illegal pre-trial detention and a serious shortage of criminal defense lawyers. For these reasons IBJ's work is instrumental. The Pursat Office carried a very heavy case load and at the time only had one lawyer on hand. In addition to the case load, transportation and communication obstacles also slowed the office's ability to serve the community. Despite these set-backs, the staff was incredibly dedicated and had a large impact on the community.

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

The attorney working in Pursat enabled many pre-trial detainees to receive trials who otherwise wouldn't have. In Cambodia you cannot be tried for a felony without a lawyer which is one reason why so many people do not receive trials. Many of the individuals were released after trial because they were found not guilty or had already served their time.

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

Increase communication between the Cambodian offices and the head office in Geneva in order to make lessons learned, best practices, and eLearning modules more accessible.

 
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Rating: 5 stars  

In the summer of 2010, I was fortunate to work with one of IBJ's JusticeMaker fellows in rural, western Kenya. Over the past year, the fellow had done work to promote women's legal rights in an area where women traditionally are either unaware of or unable/unwilling to exercise their rights due to tradition. Through community meetings and various other outreach channels like radio shows, he had provided knowledge and an accompanying desire for change to many members of his community, and subsequently set up meetings with local government officials where people could express their concerns.
During my stay, he was still working tirelessly to promote discussion and advocacy for better governance in the region. I attended many, many community meetings to discuss the upcoming referendum on a new Constitution as well as other community concerns, including those surrounding prison conditions and the inadequacies of the legal system.
I was also fortunate enough to work briefly with another IBJ funded organization in the nearby city of Kisumu. Awarded a JusticeMaker fellowship in the same year, CLEAR Kisumu is essentially a legal aid organization for citizens who probably otherwise would not be able to afford/retain representation. While it is part of a broader organization, the Kisumu office was started as a result of IBJ funding. Even in my short time there, I could see their positive impact on the community and the legal environment in western Kenya, which is an 8-hour, pothole filled world away from the comparative sophistication of Nairobi. I attended a paralegal training where one of the attorneys was explaining basic property law to local citizens and outlining the forms and procedure required by the courts. Those citizens were then setting up a legal aid center, where they could turn around and help other citizens. Another day I tagged along to a prison where the attorneys and staff members made a presentation on the upcoming constitutional referendum and answered some of the inmates legal questions. At the prison it was very apparent that the legal system moves very slowly in Kenya and that many of the inmates would not have representation at all - even to answer routine questions about paperwork/forms to be filed at the court - if it weren't for the Kisumu office. As far as I remember, the inmates are provided with a single typewriter to type their own appeals, so any time or correspondence wtih an attorney can be extremely helpful.

I had an overall fantastic experience living and working in Kenya for the summer with two of IBJ's JusticeMaker fellowship recipients. The work that the $5,000 fellowships made possible was valuable to the community and humbling to behold - I saw people whose homes have no running water or electricity passionately advocating for improvement to the system of governance, the legal culture, and the prison system in their country. As an American law student interested in rule of law work in the future, my experience with IBJ was, in short, awesome, and it would be hard to overstate the importance of the work they supported in Kenya.

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

western Kenya.

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

encourage them to establish more field offices!

 
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Rating: 4 stars  

I volunteered with International Bridges to Justice from September 2010 until December 2010 as a law school graduate on deferral from my permanent job with a law firm in Washington, DC. Overall, I really enjoyed my experience with IBJ. The staff is very small, which means a lot of one on one attention, and very dedicated to their organization. I worked primarily on helping establish and execute a grass roots competition to attract local attorneys in primarily Latin American countries to submit proposals for ideas they had on how to strengthen the rule of law in their country through educational or hands on programs. It was a good experience in teamwork as well as work management. Furthermore, I wrote a grant to help increase project funding for grass roots initiatives that focused on the intersection of criminal justice and HIV/AIDS.

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

I got to see how many ideas individuals around the world had their own ideas to strengthen the rule of law in their country and then I got to award 12 or so of them with a grant to implement their project. These projects are sure to help strengthen the rule of law through educational and hands on projects which will ensure that countless individuals receive the legal counsel many of their constitutions and governments already guarantee them.

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

limit the number of volunteers that they have at any one time since the office is very small and can easily get overcrowded. Additionally, when there are too many interns there is not enough work to go around and interns can be left underutilized.

 
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Rating: 5 stars  

As a volunteer for IBJ, I worked on a closely-knit team to plan and administer a grass-roots criminal justice competition called JusticeMakers. This competition gave international legal professionals the support and means to implement their own criminal justice initiative. I acted as the main point of contact to the competition's applicants, which meant that I was in constant contact with people from around the world.

Volunteers at IBJ have a lot of responsibility, and my supervisor was always supportive and willing to take on my ideas. Overall, this was an incredible experience, and I felt that I learned so much, both from communicating with international professionals and from the fantastic team at IBJ.

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

I was able to experience the competition from beginning to end. Announcing the winners, and communicating with them about the next stages of their project was particularly rewarding. The projects' included building legal support for brick kiln workers in Pakistan, facilitating access to counsel for juveniles in Vietnam, and teaching a paralegal class to farmers in the Philippines.

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

As a JusticeMakers volunteer I sometimes felt segregated from the rest of IBJ. I would improve communication between the different projects going on in order to get the most out of volunteers. For example, there were days where I could have used help, and days where I could have helped others, so a little more encouragement to collaborate between projects would have been helpful.

 
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Rating: 5 stars  

IBJ is a human rights organization that seeks to end criminal investigatory torture by strengthening the rule of law and developing legal aid systems in developing countries.

IBJ is a great place to work - the management board is nurturing and inspiring, the work is challenging and fascinating, and the international coworkers are amazing. While working there, my writing significantly improved and I was given the opportunities to meet brilliant legal minds at conferences, galas and other events.

IBJ works largely off volunteers, many of which are short-term volunteers. When I left the organization, I wish I could have stayed longer. Because of the goals of the organization, longevity and sustainability are important and some small details can go overlooked with a lot of short term volunteerships. I would recommend that people seeking to volunteer full time with this organization do so for no less than 9 months. Otherwise, they should work on very discrete projects.

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

the creation of a community of defenders: during the legal trainings, I truly experienced the community spirit IBJ seeks to create throughout the world in its community of defenders.

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

require internships no shorter than 9 months.

 
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