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Grand Canyon Trust

Rating: 5 stars   4 reviews 1,016

Address:

2601 N Fort Valley Rd Flagstaff AZ 86001 USA

Mission:

The mission of the grand canyon trust is to protect and restore the colorado plateau, its spectacular landscapes, flowing rivers, clean air, diversity of plants and animals, and areas of beauty and solitude.

Programs:

Native america facilitated two intertribal gatherings among colorado plateau tribes. The aim of the gatherings is to spark renewed use of traditional knowledge and practices among tribes in order to address the impacts of climate change. Opened the colorado plateau intertribal learning center in tuba city, az. Served over 20 individual clients and more than two dozen small businesses through the native american business incubator network by providing business counseling and support. The network is specifically designed to help aspiring entrepreneurs navigate the unique challenges of launching a business on the reservation. Worked closely with the save the confluence coalition, a group of local navajo families, to fight the threat of the grand canyon escalade, a proposed resort on navajo land that would include a tramway into the grand canyon to the sacred site of the confluence of the colorado and little colorado rivers.

volunteer program volunteers donated more than 15,500 hours to the trust in 2014. These passionate conservationists traveled from across the united states to restore wildlife habitat, conduct climate change and grazing reform research, and help build renewable energy infrastructure on public lands and in native american communities across the colorado plateau.

north rim ranches 1. Continued to play a leadership role with the innovative research and stewardship partnership using science to support smart land management on the north rim ranches. New 2014 research projects include: --experiments to stop the spread of range-degrading invasive cheat grass -- monitoring baseline populations of birds and bats in vermillion cliffs national monument --restoring springs for wildlife waters and livestock use -- implementing first stages of multi-year study on climate impacts on genetics and evolution on focal vegetation species. 2. Completed a unique climate adaptation plan identifying specific impact areas on the ranches, with implementation to follow in 2015. 3. Planned for expanding our ongoing camera trap/wildlife movement project. Results will help us knit back together critical habitat for mule deer, mountain lions, bighorn sheep, and other animals that need large landscape connectivity.

landscape southeast utah (100) -we are leading a coalition of conservation interests to advance well-reasoned proposals and stand together against foolish schemes in what may be the best opportunity in a generation to protect wildlands in utah as a part of the bishop initiative for eastern utah public lands. We are advocating for new forest wilderness, supporting our partners efforts on new blm wilderness, backing sensible state land trades and working to ensure that climate disaster fuels like oil shale and tar sands remain in the ground for the sake of future generations. -interim administrative protections were realized in the la sal mountains near moab after a four-year effort led by gct to bring the watershed, wildlife, hiking and mountain biking communities together on a joint alternative for non-motorized trails. We reached a compromise that accommodates mountain bike use on some trails and leaves others for non-mechanized use, and the forest service largely adopted our agreement. This model is exportable to other fs areas where trail planning may begin soon. By settling issues over trail use, the politically powerful environmental and biking communities have laid the groundwork for agreement on new wilderness in the mountain range, likely coming as a part of the bishop initiative. -we won a major legal victory with our partners at the southern utah wilderness alliance that overturned large parts of the flawed bush-era richfield blm resource management plan (rmp). The landmark ruling found that blm failed to adequately consider environmental protections, failed to minimize the impacts of designated off road vehicle routes on resources and violated the national historic preservation act by failing to conduct on-the-ground surveys of cultural resources prior to designating off road vehicle routes. Five other rmps in utah are similarly flawed, and must be similarly rectified in the coming years. Canyonlands expansion (101) -we continued our efforts with our campaign partners to protect the greater canyonlands region as a new national monument. We generated new support from local interest groups and gathered footage and interviews for an upcoming short documentary on the history, threats and solutions for the imperiled and globally unique region. The short documentary is intended for the advocacy film festival circuit and three to five accompanying shorts are intended for internet distribution; all are slated for release in late 2014. All will help to raise the profile of the region so that the administration will act to protect greater canyonlands with a new antiquities act national monument by early 2017. Utah county bills (105) -we formed a new network of activists in 2014 in three working groups - wildlands/wilderness, dirty energy and water. We cultivated relationships with the sporting community, recreationists, business owners and community activists. We planned carefully on how best to tackle tricky organizing around polarizing issues in small communities; 2014 will see this effort put more fully in to action. Forest arizona forests (130) -we continued to lead within the four forest restoration initiative, finding agreement around remaining areas of contention, and negotiating formalized agreements, such that the first 1 million acre project can proceed without litigation -we continued to lead the development of an adaptive management plan and multi party monitoring framework for the first 1 million acre project area ut forests 131 -prepared with the wilderness society of a comprehensive sustainable grazing alternative for the grand staircase-escalante national monument scoping process for its first grazing plan environmental impact statement. -prepared a 2013 trust report shows that 99-100% of most types of plant communities in the monument are grazed. -prepared a 2013 report showing that the monument contains almost no functional exclosures to compare with grazed areas. -documentedconcerns for problem-solving meetings with the forest service on 23 individual livestock allotments. -submitted to the forest service of 400 photographs of common livestock-related resource problems for consideration in the upcoming forest service presentation of the same, pursuant to their 2014 initiation of amendment of their 1986 forest plans for grazing. -assembled approximately 300 photos of livestock-free lands by expert photographers for "what our forests could be" ; and a gallery show in salt lake city of 15 of the photos framed. -led five 6-day volunteer trips for over 40 volunteers for (1) assessing boreal toad habitat; (2) assessing beaver habitat; (3) fencing private inholdings as reference areas; (4) re-reading transects in two forest service cattle allotments for final decisions; and (5) training big deal botanists for documenting vegetation conditions in livestock allotments. -supervised four interns for field work: three whitman college interns (23 weeks combined) and a high school intern from a low-income oregon community (6 weeks). -submitted complete alternatives for five forest service grazing and vegetation treatment projects (environmental assessments under the national environmental policy act). -co-chaired the monthly meetings for the 3rd year of a large consensus collaborative process, the monroe mountain working group to develop recommendations for the restoration of aspen (including groundbreaking quantitative browse thresholds to prompt actions if thresholds are not met). -gave five powerpoint presentations on grazing monitoring and decisionmaking for groups in torrey and moab, ut; whitman college; and amazing earthfest (kanab, ut). Restoring beaver 133 -wrote and published a practical guide to living with beaver, with best management practices for resolving human-beaver conflicts -built flow control devices for retention of beaver at a state park, dixie nf, and a private ranch. -responded to 15-20 calls from udwr referrals, private land owners, usgs, division of water rights, blm, ranchers, conservation groups, and others for assistance with beaver conflict resolution, including live trapping, flow control device installation, tree fencing, etc. -live trapped pair of beaver from scofield conflict area, successfully quarantined at a wildlife rehabilitation center, safely transplanted to private ranch on upper range creek in the bookcliffs, in excellent historic beaver habitat area. -organized and led flow control device workshop in moab for udwr, water rights, and private landowners. -presented beaver best management practices ata utah riparian service team meeting, and a cross watershed network conference in new mexico -organized 180- registrant webinar "cheap and cheerful stream restoration - with beaver? " with dr. Joe wheaton for the interagency national riparian service team. -co-organized with boulder community alliance a leave it to beavers festival in garfield county, ut -supervised the filming of a 10-minute documentary on beaver and climate change on forest service lands (to be completed in early 2014). -gave three powerpoint presentations on beaver at a high school, whitman college, and the utah native plant society. Escalante watershed 132 -led two volunteer trips in the escalante river watershed to (1) ground-truth predictions of potential beaver habitat by the beaver restoration assessment tool developed iin 2012 by utah state university under contract with the trust; and (2) re-measure willow recovery transects upstream of beaver dams -chaired the conservation targets committee within the diverse escalante river watershed partnership. -was filmed in the escalante watershed piece for the 10 minute documentary on beaver and climate change (see above) colorado river program major accomplishments for 2014 1. An ltemp alternative favorable to grand canyon has been developed and its major tenets are likely to be supported by the eis planning teams among the alternatives in the draft eis. 2. A high-flow event at glen canyon dam is scheduled in 2014. 3. The grand canyon trust has initiated and/or significantly influenced projects that improve resources in grand canyon consistent with our desired future conditions report. Gis major accomplishments for 2014 1. An organization wide interactive web map is fully deployed and operational. 2. Gct's programs are compelling communicated through web mapping applications. 3. Geospatial data products and services will be of the highest and professional quality and requested and used across the colorado plateau. Grand canyon program major accomplishments for 2013 1. Interior's 20-year ban on new mining claims is upheld in federal courts and agencies are required to complete new environmental assessments for existing uranium mines. 2. The escalade proposal is withdrawn and a long-term strategy is implemented for protecting marble canyon below the rim and for enabling community based economic development. 3. "keeping the canyon grand" campaign plan is completed and implementation

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www.grandcanyontrust.org

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Reviews for Grand Canyon Trust

Rating: 5 stars  

8 people found this review helpful

A great organization. The projects that they are involved in to preserve the areas around the Grand Canyon are extremely important. The people involved with the organization are very dedicated and extremely nice. The volunteer projects that they do are very well organized and a great deal of fun. I had a great time on the project that I did last summer. I am eagerly looking forward to being involved more with this organization.

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

A very interesting project studying plant and tree growth after a fire on the Kaibab plateau.

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

Have even more trips that volunteers could participate in.

What I've enjoyed the most about my experience with this nonprofit is...

The volunteer project I was involved in was very interesting and a lot of fun. I enjoyed the project, the people I met, and camping out north of the Grand Canyon.

The kinds of staff and volunteers that I met were...

Very dedicated, passionate about what they do, very nice, and very friendly.

If this organization had 10 million bucks, it could...

Help preserve the Grand Canyon and the areas around it. One of the world's greatest environmental areas should definitely be protected!

Ways to make it better...

My experience was great. I want to be involved with this organization more.

In my opinion, the biggest challenges facing this organization are...

Protecting the areas around the Grand Canyon from development.

One thing I'd also say is that...

This is a great organization.

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2008-1-01

 
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Rating: 5 stars  

9 people found this review helpful

GCT does excellent work on a broad range of issues. I am particularly pleased to see their volunteer program developing into such a vital part of the organization, as it has the potential to deeply connect individuals to the mission through experiential learning, long-lasting social connections, and a greater sense of purpose and drive. In my first volunteer experience with GCT just a couple of weeks ago, I found they do an excellent job in coordinating efforts and making volunteers feel valued. And it was just plain fun!

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

their tremendous accomplishments across the Colorado Plateau.

If I had to make changes to this organization, I would...

try to get even greater publicity about the great work being accomplished.

What I've enjoyed the most about my experience with this nonprofit is...

the opportunity to learn in the field and reconnect with my passion for field work.

The kinds of staff and volunteers that I met were...

committed, hard-working and fun to be with.

If this organization had 10 million bucks, it could...

do what it does even more effectively!

Ways to make it better...

I had been able to attend a training ahead of time.

In my opinion, the biggest challenges facing this organization are...

funding the wide variety of programs they carry out.

One thing I'd also say is that...

I will continue to volunteer.

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2009-4-01

 
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Rating: 5 stars  

8 people found this review helpful

This is an amazing organization. It is a wonderful experience for volunteers to learn about the landscape and the human impacts to our environment in a hands on atmosphere. The people who work with the grand canyon trust are passionate about their work and they love what they do. With more funding, this organization could really work wonders for the land on the kaibab plateau and raise awareness about land preservation.

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

the work that my team and I did. For instance, we tore down an old fence that was negatively impacting species diversity, and we could literally see the miles of fence as it disappeared. It felt like such an accomplishment!

What I've enjoyed the most about my experience with this nonprofit is...

being able to learn the purpose behind all the work I did; this made it more meaningful to me.

The kinds of staff and volunteers that I met were...

extremely accommodating, friendly and knowledgeable in their field.

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2009-3-01

 
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Role: Professional with expertise in this field
Rating: 5 stars  

8 people found this review helpful

The Grand Canyon Trust is an organization that gets things done. This nonprofit sticks to it's mission, is open to discussions, and puts volunteers on-the-ground doing meaningful, real conservation and restoration work across the Colorado Plateau. I have not seen a nonprofit such as this that has an attitude so worldly and enthusiastic about protecting landscapes they care so deeply about.

I've personally experienced the results of this organization in...

each volunteers face as they felt connected with the landscapes of the southwest.

What I've enjoyed the most about my experience with this nonprofit is...

the huge difference we are making across the Plateau in various areas of conservation and restoration and the physical difference that shows across the landscape

The kinds of staff and volunteers that I met were...

enthusiastic, passionate, knowledgable, driven, and dedicated.

If this organization had 10 million bucks, it could...

protect the biodiversity of landscapes covering over four states in the western part of this country.

When was your last experience with this nonprofit?

2009-4-01

 
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